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META-SHARE, the open language resource exchange facility, is devoted to the sustainable sharing and dissemination of language resources (LRs) and aims at increasing access to such resources in a global scale. META-SHARE is an open, integrated, secure and interoperable sharing and exchange facility for LRs (datasets and tools) for the Human Language Technologies domain and other applicative domains where language plays a critical role. META-SHARE is implemented in the framework of the META-NET Network of Excellence. It is designed as a network of distributed repositories of LRs, including language data and basic language processing tools (e.g., morphological analysers, PoS taggers, speech recognisers, etc.). Data and tools can be both open and with restricted access rights, free and for-a-fee.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
Cocoon "COllections de COrpus Oraux Numériques" is a technical platform that accompanies the oral resource producers, create, organize and archive their corpus; a corpus can consist of records (usually audio) possibly accompanied by annotations of these records. The resources registered are first cataloged and stored while, and then, secondly archived in the archive of the TGIR Huma-Num. The author and his institution are responsible for filings and may benefit from a restricted and secure access to their data for a defined period, if the content of the information is considered sensitive. The COCOON platform is jointly operated by two joint research units: Laboratoire de Langues et civilisations à tradition orale (LACITO - UMR7107 - Université Paris3 / INALCO / CNRS) and Laboratoire Ligérien de Linguistique (LLL - UMR7270 - Universités d'Orléans et de Tours, BnF, CNRS).
Lithuania became a full member of CLARIN ERIC in January of 2015 and soon CLARIN-LT consortium was founded by three partner universities: Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas Technology University and Vilnius University. The main goal of the consortium is to become a CLARIN B centre, which will be able to serve language users in Lithuania and Europe for storing and accessing language resources.
The goal of the Center of Estonian Language Resources (CELR) is to create and manage an infrastructure to make the Estonian language digital resources (dictionaries, corpora – both text and speech –, various language databases) and language technology tools (software) available to everyone working with digital language materials. CELR coordinates and organises the documentation and archiving of the resources as well as develops language technology standards and draws up necessary legal contracts and licences for different types of users (public, academic, commercial, etc.). In addition to collecting language resources, a system will be launched for introducing the resources to, informing and educating the potential users. The main users of CELR are researchers from Estonian R&D institutions and Social Sciences and Humanities researchers all over the world via the CLARIN ERIC network of similar centers in Europe. Access to data is provided through different sites: Public Repository https://entu.keeleressursid.ee/public-document , Language resources https://keeleressursid.ee/en/resources/corpora, and MetaShare CELR https://metashare.ut.ee/
In collaboration with other centres in the CLARIN-D consortium, the UdS CLARIN-D centre enables eHumanities by providing a service for hosting and processing language resources (notably corpora) for members of the research community. The UdS CLARIN-D centre thus contributes of lifting the fragmentation of language resources by assisting members of the research community in preparing language materials in such a way that easy discovery is ensured, interchange is facilitated and preservation is enabled by enriching such materials with meta-information, transforming them into sustainable formats and hosting them. We have an explicit mission to archive language resources especially multilingual corpora (parallel, comparable) and corpora including specific registers, both collected by associated researchers as well as researchers who are not affiliated with us.