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Found 18 result(s)
The Buckeye Corpus of conversational speech contains high-quality recordings from 40 speakers in Columbus OH conversing freely with an interviewer. The speech has been orthographically transcribed and phonetically labeled. The audio and text files, together with time-aligned phonetic labels, are stored in a format for use with speech analysis software (Xwaves and Wavesurfer). Software for searching the transcription files is currently being written.
OLAC, the Open Language Archives Community, is an international partnership of institutions and individuals who are creating a worldwide virtual library of language resources by: (i) developing consensus on best current practice for the digital archiving of language resources, and (ii) developing a network of interoperating repositories and services for housing and accessing such resources.
CHILDES is the child language component of the TalkBank system. TalkBank is a system for sharing and studying conversational interactions.
D-PLACE contains cultural, linguistic, environmental and geographic information for over 1400 human ‘societies’. A ‘society’ in D-PLACE represents a group of people in a particular locality, who often share a language and cultural identity. All cultural descriptions are tagged with the date to which they refer and with the ethnographic sources that provided the descriptions. The majority of the cultural descriptions in D-PLACE are based on ethnographic work carried out in the 19th and early-20th centuries (pre-1950).
By stimulating inspiring research and producing innovative tools, Huygens ING intends to open up old and inaccessible sources, and to understand them better. Huygens ING’s focus is on Digital Humanities, History, History of Science, and Textual Scholarship. Huygens ING pursues research in the fields of History, Literary Studies, the History of Science and Digital Humanities. Huygens ING aims to publish digital sources and data responsibly and with care. Innovative tools are made as widely available as possible. We strive to share the available knowledge at the institute with both academic peers and the wider public.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
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MICASE provides a collection of transcripts of academic speech events recorded at the University of Michigan. The original DAT audiotapes are held in the English Language Institute and may be consulted by bona fide researchers under special arrangements
The English Lexicon Project (supported by the National Science Foundation) affords access to a large set of lexical characteristics, along with behavioral data from visual lexical decision and naming studies of 40,481 words and 40,481 nonwords.
>>>>> As of 01/12/2015, deposit of data on SLDR website will be suspended to allow the public opening of Ortolang platform https://www.ortolang.fr/#/market/home .<<<<<Speech & Language Data Repository (SLDR) is a Trusted Data Repository offering labs and scholars a free-of-charge service for sharing their oral/linguistic data and archiving it with the help of procedures compliant with the OAIS model for long-term preservation. Its entire storage is referenced in international repositories such as OLAC (Open Language Archives Community) and CLARIN Virtual Language Observatory (VLO). Currently, packages are distributed via the TGE-Adonis grid, now integrated in Huma-Num, hosted by CC-IN2P3 and preserved on the platform of CINES, an institutional archive beneficiary of the Data Seal of Approval.
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
Additionally to the institutional repository, current St. Edward's faculty have the option of uploading their work directly to their own SEU accounts on stedwards.figshare.com. Projects created on Figshare will automatically be published on this website as well. For more information, please see documentation
Answering an increasing demand for digital and collective research features in the humanities, TextGrid has, since its start in 2006, established the infrastructure for a respective virtual research environment. In continuous exchange with the scientific community, TextGrid has developed a variety of tools and services available for free download in a stable version. Together with the TextGrid Repository, the Virtual Research environment TextGrid offers humanist researcher in the humanities sustainable editing, storing and publishing of their data in a thoroughly tested and safe environment. The vision of a digital ecosystem is based on the open source idea, allowing for free exchange of tools and data, whereby adaptation concerning discipline-specific needs is made possible. Researchers from a wide range of humanistic disciplines such as philology, linguistics, musicology, art history, classical philology and musicology are actively working with TextGrid have joined the TextGrid consortium in the second phase of the project.
The Alaska Native Language Archive houses documentation of the various Native languages of Alaska and helps to preserve and cultivate this unique heritage for future generations. As the premier repository worldwide for information relating to the Native languages of Alaska, the Archive serves researchers, teachers and students, as well as members of the broader community. The collection includes both published and unpublished materials in or on all of the Alaska Native languages and related languages. The collection has enduring cultural, historic, and intellectual value, particularly for Alaska Native language speakers and their descendants
The Tromsø Repository of Language and Linguistics (TROLLing) is designed as an archive of linguistic data and statistical code. The archive is open access, which means that all information is available to everyone. All postings are accompanied by searchable metadata that identify the researchers, the languages and linguistic phenomena involved, the statistical methods applied, and scholarly publications based on the data (where relevant). Linguists worldwide are invited to post datasets and statistical code used in their linguistic research.
The Digital South Asia Library provides digital materials for reference and research on South Asia to scholars, public officials, business leaders, and other users. This program builds upon a two-year pilot project funded by the Association of Research Libraries' Global Resources Program with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
Welcome to the UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. For over half a century, the UCLA Phonetics Laboratory has collected recordings of hundreds of languages from around the world, providing source materials for phonetic and phonological research, of value to scholars, speakers of the languages, and language learners alike. The materials on this site comprise audio recordings illustrating phonetic structures from over 200 languages with phonetic transcriptions, plus scans of original field notes where relevant.