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Found 47 result(s)
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Research Data Centres offer a secure access to detailed microdata from Statistics Canada's surveys, and to Canadian censuses' data, as well as to an increasing number of administrative data sets. The search engine was designed to help you find out more easily which dataset among all the surveys available in the RDCs best suits your research needs.
KLIPS (Korean Labor & Income Panel Study) is a longitudinal survey of the labor market / income activities of households and individuals residing in urban areas. The 1st Wave of the KLIPS was launched by the KLI (Korea Labor Institute) in 1998, amid an unprecedented economic crisis and labor market turmoil.
The figshare service for Monash University, Australia was launched in 2014 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing Metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
META-SHARE, the open language resource exchange facility, is devoted to the sustainable sharing and dissemination of language resources (LRs) and aims at increasing access to such resources in a global scale. META-SHARE is an open, integrated, secure and interoperable sharing and exchange facility for LRs (datasets and tools) for the Human Language Technologies domain and other applicative domains where language plays a critical role. META-SHARE is implemented in the framework of the META-NET Network of Excellence. It is designed as a network of distributed repositories of LRs, including language data and basic language processing tools (e.g., morphological analysers, PoS taggers, speech recognisers, etc.). Data and tools can be both open and with restricted access rights, free and for-a-fee.
The UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website gathers two categories of content managed by the Library: library collections (including digitized versions of selected collections covering topics such as art, film, music, history and anthropology) and research data collections (including research data generated by UC San Diego researchers).
ResearchWorks Archive is the University of Washington’s digital repository (also known as “institutional repository”) for disseminating and preserving scholarly work. ResearchWorks Archive can accept any digital file format or content (examples include numerical datasets, photographs and diagrams, working papers, technical reports, pre-prints and post-prints of published articles).
The Research Collection is ETH Zurich's publication platform. It unites the functions of a university bibliography, an open access repository and a research data repository within one platform. Researchers who are affiliated with ETH Zurich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, may deposit research data from all domains. They can publish data as a standalone publication, publish it as supplementary material for an article, dissertation or another text, share it with colleagues or a research group, or deposit it for archiving purposes. Research-data-specific features include flexible access rights settings, DOI registration and a DOI preview workflow, content previews for zip- and tar-containers, as well as download statistics and altmetrics for published data. All data uploaded to the Research Collection are also transferred to the ETH Data Archive, ETH Zurich’s long-term archive.
SSDA Dataverse is one of the archiving opportunities of SSDA, the others are: Data can be archived by SSDA itself (http://dataarchives.ss.ucla.edu/index.html) or by ICPSR or by UCLA Library or by California Digital Library. The Social Science Data Archives serves the UCLA campus as an archive of faculty and graduate student survey research. We provide long term storage of data files and documentation. We ensure that the data are useable in the future by migrating files to new operating systems. We follow government standards and archival best practices. The mission of the Social Science Data Archive has been and continues to be to provide a foundation for social science research with faculty support throughout an entire research project involving original data collection or the reuse of publicly available studies. Data Archive staff and researchers work as partners throughout all stages of the research process, beginning when a hypothesis or area of study is being developed, during grant and funding activities, while data collection and/or analysis is ongoing, and finally in long term preservation of research results. Our role is to provide a collaborative environment where the focus is on understanding the nature and scope of research approach and management of research output throughout the entire life cycle of the project. Instructional support, especially support that links research with instruction is also a mainstay of operations.
ARCHE (A Resource Centre for the HumanitiEs) is a service aimed at offering stable and persistent hosting as well as dissemination of digital research data and resources for the Austrian humanities community. ARCHE welcomes data from all humanities fields. ARCHE - being the successor of the Language Resources Portal (LRP) - is offering language resources as Austria’s connection point to the European network of CLARIN Centres.
The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research is one of the world's leading archives of social science data, specializing in data from surveys of public opinion. The data held by the Roper Center range from the 1930s, when survey research was in its infancy, to the present. Most of the data are from the United States, but over 50 nations are represented.
The Brown Digital Repository (BDR) is a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown.
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mdw Repository provides researchers with a robust infrastructure for research data management and ensures accessibility of research data during and after completion of research projects, thus, providing a quality boost to contemporary and future research.
The Scholars Portal Dataverse network is a repository for research data collected by individuals and organizations associated with Ontario universities. The Dataverse platform makes it easy for researchers to deposit data, create appropriate metadata, and version documents as you work. Access to data and supporting documentation can be controlled down to the file level, and researchers can choose to make content available publicly, only to select individuals, or to keep it completely locked.
NACDA acquires and preserves data relevant to gerontological research, processing as needed to promote effective research use, disseminates them to researchers, and facilitates their use. By preserving and making available the largest library of electronic data on aging in the United States, NACDA offers opportunities for secondary analysis on major issues of scientific and policy relevance
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
Country
The arctic data archive system (ADS) collects observation data and modeling products obtained by various Japanese research projects and gives researchers to access the results. By centrally managing a wide variety of Arctic observation data, we promote the use of data across multiple disciplines. Researchers use these integrated databases to clarify the mechanisms of environmental change in the atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and cryosphere. That ADS will be provide an opportunity of collaboration between modelers and field scientists, can be expected.
The University of Lincoln's Institutional Repository is for the permanent deposit of research outputs produced by the University. Repository content can be browsed or searched through this website or through searching the internet. Wherever possible, repository content is freely available for download and use according to our Copyright and Use Notice.
DR-NTU (Data) is the institutional open access research data repository for Nanyang Technological University (NTU). NTU researchers are encouraged to use DR-NTU (Data) to deposit, publish and archive their final research data in order to make their research data discoverable, accessible and reusable.
The Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF) contains population panel data from Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Korea, Russia, Switzerland and the United States. Each of these countries undertakes a longitudinal household economic survey. The data are made equivalent, providing a reference dataset which cross-links each of the individual studies and allowing cross-national comparisons.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
Cocoon "COllections de COrpus Oraux Numériques" is a technical platform that accompanies the oral resource producers, create, organize and archive their corpus; a corpus can consist of records (usually audio) possibly accompanied by annotations of these records. The resources registered are first cataloged and stored while, and then, secondly archived in the archive of the TGIR Huma-Num. The author and his institution are responsible for filings and may benefit from a restricted and secure access to their data for a defined period, if the content of the information is considered sensitive. The COCOON platform is jointly operated by two joint research units: Laboratoire de Langues et civilisations à tradition orale (LACITO - UMR7107 - Université Paris3 / INALCO / CNRS) and Laboratoire Ligérien de Linguistique (LLL - UMR7270 - Universités d'Orléans et de Tours, BnF, CNRS).
IDEALS is an institutional repository that collects, disseminates, and provides persistent and reliable access to the research and scholarship of faculty, staff, and students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Faculty, staff, graduate students, and in some cases undergraduate students, can deposit their research and scholarship directly into IDEALS. Departments can use IDEALS to distribute their working papers, technical reports, or other research material. Contact us at https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/feedback for more information.
The University Information System RUSSIA (UIS RUSSIA) is a mutual project of Research Computing Center and Economic Faculty at Lomonosov Moscow State University. It was introduced in 2000 and has been designed as a digital library for research and educational purposes, primarily in the fields of economic and social sciences. Since then it was maintained to meet the growing interest and challenges of the Russian universities and educational community. Starting from 2003 our development team concentrated on statistical databases to build an infrastructure for educational courses, to assist broad Russian social and economic studies from regional to local and down to household level. Today profound knowledge of statistical data and ability to implement advanced modern methods of applied analysis are expected from successful university graduates and are in high demand among new specialists, particularly in economics, public administration and related areas.
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IDA is a storage service for research data provided by the Ministry of Education and Culture to actors in the Finnish research system. The service is produced by CSC – IT Center for Science (CSC). IDA enables the safe storage of research datasets and related metadata. Access to the data may be granted within the research project or for a wider group of users. The service is intended for stable research data, both raw data and processed datasets. Owners of the data decide on the openness and usage policies for their own data. The service is not intended for data containing sensitive personal data. The data stored in the service must be connected to a research project. The person responsible for the project acts as a contact person towards the service provider and decides who can access the data in the project. Users may belong to one or more projects. Data stored in IDA is checked for viruses and integrity upon receipt. Data is automatically copied and the integrity of both the original files and copies is monitored. The service is offered to Finnish universities and polytechnics as well as projects and researchers funded by the Academy of Finland.
The IWH Research Data Centre provides external scientists with data for non-commercial research. The research data centre of the IWH was accredited by RatSWD.