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The Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD) is a collection of atomic and molecular transition parameters of astronomical interest. VALD offers tools for selecting subsets of lines for typical astrophysical applications: line identification, preparing for spectroscopic observations, chemical composition and radial velocity measurements, model atmosphere calculations etc.
This is a compilation of approximately 923,000 allowed, intercombination and forbidden atomic transitions with wavelengths in the range from 0.5 Å to 1000 µm. It's primary intention is to allow the identification of observed atomic absorption or emission features. The wavelengths in this list are all calculated from the difference between the energy of the upper and lower level of the transition. No attempt has been made to include observed wavelengths. Most of the atomic energy level data have been taken from the Atomic Spectra Database provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
The Innsbruck Dissociative Electron Attachment (DEA) DataBase node holds relative cross sections for dissociative electron attachment processes of the form: AB + e– –> A– + B, where AB is a molecule. It hence supports querying by various identifiers for molecules and atoms, such as chemical names, stoichiometric formulae, InChI (-keys) and CAS registry numbers. These identifiers are searched both in products and reactants of the processes. It then returns XSAMS files describing the processes found including numeric values for the relative cross sections of the processes. Alternatively, cross sections can be exported as plain ASCII files.
The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) contains data for radiative transitions and energy levels in atoms and atomic ions. Data are included for observed transitions and energy levels of most of the known chemical elements. ASD contains data on spectral lines with wavelengths from about 0.2 Å (ångströms) to 60 m (meters). For many lines, ASD includes radiative transition probabilities. The energy level data include the ground states and ionization energies for all spectra. Except where noted, the data have been critically evaluated by NIST. For most spectra, wavelengths, transition probabilities, relative intensities, and energy levels are integrated, so that all the available information for a given transition is incorporated under a single listing. For classified lines, in addition to the observed wavelength, ASD includes the Ritz wavelength, which is the wavelength derived from the energy levels. The Ritz wavelengths are usually more precise than the observed ones. Line lists containing classified lines can be ordered by either multiplet (for a given spectrum) or wavelength. For some spectra, ASD includes lists of prominent lines with wavelengths and relative intensities but without energy-level classifications.
STARK-B is a database of calculated widths and shifts of isolated lines of atoms and ions due to electron and ion collisions. This database is devoted to modeling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes. In addition, it is also devoted to laboratory plasmas, laser equipments and technological plasmas. So, the domain of temperatures and densities covered by the tables is wide and depends on the ionization degree of the considered ion. The temperature can vary from several thousands for neutral atoms to several hundred thousands of Kelvin for highly charged ions. The electron or ion density can vary from 1012 (case of stellar atmospheres) to several 1019cm-3 (some white dwarfs and some laboratory plasmas).