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The Detection of Archaeological Residues using Remote-sensing Techniques (DART) project was initiated in 2010 in order to investigate the ability of various sensors to detect archaeological features in ‘difficult’ circumstances. Concluding in September 2013, DART had the overall aim of developing analytical methods for identifying and quantifying gradual changes and dynamics in sensor responses associated with surface and near-surface archaeological features under different environmental and land-management conditions.
D-PLACE contains cultural, linguistic, environmental and geographic information for over 1400 human ‘societies’. A ‘society’ in D-PLACE represents a group of people in a particular locality, who often share a language and cultural identity. All cultural descriptions are tagged with the date to which they refer and with the ethnographic sources that provided the descriptions. The majority of the cultural descriptions in D-PLACE are based on ethnographic work carried out in the 19th and early-20th centuries (pre-1950).
Science Photo Library (SPL) provides creative professionals with striking specialist imagery, unrivalled in quality, accuracy and depth of information. We have more than 600,000 images and 40,000 clips to choose from, with hundreds of new submissions uploaded to the website each week.
The HMAP Data Pages are a research resource comprising of information derived largely from historical records relating to fishing catches and effort in selected spatial and temporal contexts. The History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP), the historical component of the Census of Marine Life, aimed to improve our understanding of ecosystem dynamics, specifically with regard to long-term changes in stock abundance, the ecological impact of large-scale harvesting by man, and the role of marine resources in the historical development of human society. HMAP data is also accessible through the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS): http://www.iobis.org/, see also: http://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset
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In a changing climate, water raises increasingly complex challenges: concerning its quantity, quality, availability, allocation, use and significance as a habitat, resource and cultural medium. Dharmae, a ‘Data Hub of Australian Research on Marine and Aquatic Ecocultures’ brings together multi-disciplinary research data relating to water in all these forms. The term “ecoculture” guides the development of this collection and its approach to data discovery. Ecoculture recognizes that, since nature and culture are inextricably linked, there is a corresponding need for greater interconnectedness of the different knowledge systems applied to them.
Chapman University Digital Commons is an open access digital repository and publication platform designed to collect, store, index, and provide access to the scholarly and creative output of Chapman University faculty, students, staff, and affiliates. In it are faculty research papers and books, data sets, outstanding student work, audiovisual materials, images, special collections, and more, all created by members of or owned by Chapman University. The datasets are listed in a separate collection.
The Map Collection at the Faculty of Science CU (formerly the State Map Collection) belongs to one of the most extensive university map collections in Central and East Europe. The map collection is digitized as part of the Czech Ministry of Culture's project NAKI.