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Found 194 result(s)
The Clean Energy Project Database (CEPDB) is a massive reference database for organic semiconductors with a particular emphasis on photovoltaic applications. It was created to store and provide access to data from computational as well as experimental studies, on both known and virtual compounds. It is a free and open resource designed to support researchers in the field of organic electronics in their scientific pursuits. The CEPDB was established as part of the Harvard Clean Energy Project (CEP), a virtual high-throughput screening initiative to identify promising new candidates for the next generation of carbon-based solar cell materials.
The British Geological Survey (BGS), the world’s oldest national geological survey, has over 400 datasets including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives.
Apollo (previously DSpace@Cambridge) is the University of Cambridge’s institutional repository, preserving and providing access to content created by members of the University. The repository stores a range of content and provides different levels of access, but its primary focus is on providing open access to the University’s research publications.
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The CyberCell database (CCDB) is a comprehensive collection of detailed enzymatic, biological, chemical, genetic, and molecular biological data about E. coli (strain K12, MG1655). It is intended to provide sufficient information and querying capacity for biologists and computer scientists to use computers or detailed mathematical models to simulate all or part of a bacterial cell at a nanoscopic (10-9 m), mesoscopic (10-8 m).The CyberCell database CCDB actually consists of 4 browsable databases: 1) the main CyberCell database (CCDB - containing gene and protein information), 2) the 3D structure database (CC3D – containing information for structural proteomics), 3) the RNA database (CCRD – containing tRNA and rRNA information), and 4) the metabolite database (CCMD – containing metabolite information). Each of these databases is accessible through hyperlinked buttons located at the top of the CCDB homepage. All CCDB sub-databases are fully web enabled, permitting a wide variety of interactive browsing, search and display operations. and microscopic (10-6 m) level.
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More than 25 years ago FIZ Karlsruhe started depositing crystal structure data linked to publications in German journals. At that time it was irrelevant whether the deposited structures were organic or inorganic. Today FIZ Karlsruhe is responsible for storing the structure data of inorganic compounds. Organic structure data are stored by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center. Nowadays many publishers inform their authors that in parallel to a publication in a scientific journal, crystal structure data should also be stored in the Crystal Structure Depot at FIZ Karlsruhe. A CSD number will be assigned to the data for later reference in the publication. The data can then be ordered from the Crystal Structure Depot at FIZ Karlsruhe.
This database gives values of the basic constants and conversion factors of physics and chemistry resulting from the 2002 least-squares adjustment of the fundamental physical constants as published by the CODATA Task Group on Fundamental Constants and recommended for international use by CODATA.
The EELS database is a public interactive consultable web repository of outer-shell and inner-shell excitation spectra from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray experiments, which forms a reference catalog of fine structures for materials. Each spectrum is available with a full set of recording parameters providing a complete overview of the working conditions. The database must also be seen as a research tool for EEL spectroscopists, theoreticians, students, or private firms and a central “location” for the growing EELS community.
Portal to Los Alamos Opacity Codes is your gateway to the set of opacity codes developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The TOPS code has been developed to calculate multigroup opacities that can be written in a variety of formats for use in radiation transport codes. Arbitrary mixture of any elements for which OPLIB data exist is supported. Opacities of special mixtures that are important in astrophysical applications are also available as a separate option (Astrophysical opacities).
The Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) provides independent estimates of the global anthropogenic emissions and emission trends, based on publicly available statistics, for the atmospheric modeling community as well as for policy makers. This scientific independent emission inventory is characterized by a coherent world historical trend from 1970 to year x-3, including emissions of all greenhouse gases, air pollutants and aerosols. Data are presented for all countries, with emissions provided per main source category, and spatially allocated on a 0.1x0.1 grid over the globe.
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The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), a major contributor to the worldwide atmospheric research effort, consists of a set of globally distributed research stations providing consistent, standardized, long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases, particles, spectral UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface, and physical parameters, centered around the following priorities.
The Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN) supports researchers with data management services and is focused on building and maintaining a catalog of research data and standards-compliant metadata. Quality data and metadata developed in research projects and curated by NKN is a valuable, long-term asset for a public land-grant University and provides a foundation and source upon which to develop and build new research and science.
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This portal applicaton brings together the data collected and published via OGC Web-services from the individual observatories and provides access of the data to the public. Therefore, it serves as a database node to provide scientists and decision makers with reliable and well accessible data and data products.
mzCloud is an extensively curated database of high-resolution tandem mass spectra that are arranged into spectral trees. MS/MS and multi-stage MSn spectra were acquired at various collision energies, precursor m/z, and isolation widths using Collision-induced dissociation (CID) and Higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD). Each raw mass spectrum was filtered and recalibrated giving rise to additional filtered and recalibrated spectral trees that are fully searchable. Besides the experimental and processed data, each database record contains the compound name with synonyms, the chemical structure, computationally and manually annotated fragments (peaks), identified adducts and multiply charged ions, molecular formulas, predicted precursor structures, detailed experimental information, peak accuracies, mass resolution, InChi, InChiKey, and other identifiers. mzCloud is a fully searchable library that allows spectra searches, tree searches, structure and substructure searches, monoisotopic mass searches, peak (m/z) searches, precursor searches, and name searches. mzCloud is free and available for public use online.
MassBank of North America (MoNA) is a metadata-centric, auto-curating repository designed for efficient storage and querying of mass spectral records. It intends to serve as a the framework for a centralized, collaborative database of metabolite mass spectra, metadata and associated compounds. MoNA currently contains over 200,000 mass spectral records from experimental and in-silico libraries as well as from user contributions.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
DARECLIMED data repository consists of three kind of data: (a) climate, (b) water resources, and (c) energy related data. The first part, climate datasets, will include atmospheric and indirect atmospheric data, proxies and reconstructions, terrestrial and oceanic data. Land use, population, economy and development data will be added as well. Datasets can be handled and analyzed by connecting to the Live Access Server (LAS), which enables to visualize data with on-the-fly graphics, request custom subsets of variables in a choice of file formats, access background reference material about the data (metadata), and compare (difference) variables from distributed locations. Access to server is granted upon request by emailing the data repository manager.
ODIN contains engineering databases (Mat-Database, Hiad-Database, Nesshy-Database, HTR-Fuel-Database, HTR-Graphit-Database) and document management sites and other information related to European research in the area of nuclear and conventional energy.
The UCD Digital Library is a platform for exploring cultural heritage, engaging with digital scholarship, and accessing research data. The UCD Digital Library allows you to search, browse and explore a growing collection of historical materials, photographs, art, interviews, letters, and other exciting content, that have been digitised and made freely available.
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide.