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Found 14 result(s)
The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) is the Department of Energy's (DOE) electronic database comprised of health studies of DOE contract workers and environmental studies of areas surrounding DOE facilities. DOE recognizes the benefits of data sharing and supports the public's right to know about worker and community health risks. CEDR provides independent researchers and the public with access to de-identified data collected since the Department's early production years. Current CEDR holdings include more than 80 studies of over 1 million workers at 31 DOE sites. Access to these data is at no cost to the user. Most of CEDR's holdings are derived from epidemiologic studies of DOE workers at many large nuclear weapons plants, such as Hanford, Los Alamos, the Oak Ridge reservation, Savannah River Site, and Rocky Flats. These studies primarily use death certificate information to identify excess deaths and patterns of disease among workers to determine what factors contribute to the risk of developing cancer and other illnesses. In addition, many of these studies have radiation exposure measurements on individual workers. CEDR is supported by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Now a mature system in routine operational use, CEDR's modern internet-based systems respond to thousands of requests to its web server daily. With about 1,500 Internet sites pointing to CEDR's web site, CEDR is a national user facility, with a large audience for data that are not available elsewhere.
MTD is focused on mammalian transcriptomes with a current version that contains data from humans, mice, rats and pigs. Regarding the core features, the MTD browses genes based on their neighboring genomic coordinates or joint KEGG pathway and provides expression information on exons, transcripts, and genes by integrating them into a genome browser. We developed a novel nomenclature for each transcript that considers its genomic position and transcriptional features.
The Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database (CFTR1) was initiated by the Cystic Fibrosis Genetic Analysis Consortium in 1989 to increase and facilitate communications among CF researchers, and is maintained by the Cystic Fibrosis Centre at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. The specific aim of the database is to provide up to date information about individual mutations in the CFTR gene. In a major upgrade in 2010, all known CFTR mutations and sequence variants have been converted to the standard nomenclature recommended by the Human Genome Variation Society.
The International Center for Global Earth Models collects and distributes historical and actual global gravity field models of the Earth and offers calculation service for derived quantities. In particular the tasks include: collecting and archiving of all existing global gravity field models, web interface for getting access to global gravity field models, web based visualization of the gravity field models their differences and their time variation, web based service for calculating different functionals of the gravity field models, web site for tutorials on spherical harmonics and the theory of the calculation service. As new service since 2016, ICGEM is providing a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) for the data set of the model (the coefficients).
Virtual Fly Brain (VFB) - an interactive tool for neurobiologists to explore the detailed neuroanatomy, neuron connectivity and gene expression of the adult Drosophila melanogaster brain.
The NCBI Short Genetic Variations database, commonly known as dbSNP, catalogs short variations in nucleotide sequences from a wide range of organisms. These variations include single nucleotide variations, short nucleotide insertions and deletions, short tandem repeats and microsatellites. Short Genetic Variations may be common, thus representing true polymorphisms, or they may be rare. Some rare human entries have additional information associated withthem, including disease associations, genotype information and allele origin, as some variations are somatic rather than germline events. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017***
The Immunology Database and Analysis Portal (ImmPort) archives clinical study and trial data generated by NIAID/DAIT-funded investigators. Data types housed in ImmPort include subject assessments i.e., medical history, concomitant medications and adverse events as well as mechanistic assay data such as flow cytometry, ELISA, ELISPOT, etc. --- You won't need an ImmPort account to search for compelling studies, peruse study demographics, interventions and mechanistic assays. But why stop there? What you really want to do is download the study, look at each experiment in detail including individual ELISA results and flow cytometry files. Perhaps you want to take those flow cytometry files for a test drive using FLOCK in the ImmPort flow cytometry module. To download all that interesting data you will need to register for ImmPort access.
The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species provides taxonomic, conservation status and distribution data on plants and animals that are critically endangered, endangered and vulnerable. Data are available in Esri File Geodatabase format, Esri Shapefile format, and Excel format.
Earthdata powered by EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) is a key core capability in NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA’s Earth science data from various sources – satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. For the EOS satellite missions, EOSDIS provides capabilities for command and control, scheduling, data capture and initial (Level 0) processing. These capabilities, constituting the EOSDIS Mission Operations, are managed by the Earth Science Mission Operations (ESMO) Project. NASA network capabilities transport the data to the science operations facilities. EOSDIS uses the metadata and service discovery tool Earthdata Search (formerly: REVERB).
The CCHDO provides data collection and documentation, primarily from research funded by the NSF. Data and documentation in this database includes research from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, and Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR). Data can be browsed by ocean, time series, project, or map.
International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) provides and collects multi-year continuous data on atmospheric conditions in the Arctic. International Polar Year (IPY) maintains partnerships with Arctic observatories from Sweden, Canada, United States, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland. Each IASOA observatory features extensive suites of co-located, research grade active, passive and in-situ observing systems. Atmospheric characteristics of interest are standard meteorology, greenhouse gases, atmospheric radiation, clouds, pollutants, chemistry, aerosols, and surface energy balances. IASOA operates within boundaries defined by (1) the Arctic (2) the atmosphere (3) the ground-based vantage point (4) data generated by instrument systems and (5) multi-year continuous records to support climate studies.
DLESE is the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings. Resources in DLESE include lesson plans, scientific data, visualizations, interactive computer models, and virtual field trips - in short, any web-accessible teaching or learning material. Many of these resources are organized in collections, or groups of related resources that reflect a coherent, focused theme. In many ways, digital collections are analogous to collections in traditional bricks-and-mortar libraries.
The GTN-P database is an object-related database open for a diverse range of data. Because of the complexity of the PAGE21 project, data provided in the GTN-P management system are extremely diverse, ranging from active-layer thickness measurements once per year to flux measurement every second and everthing else in between. The data can be assigned to two broad categories: Quantitative data which is all data that can be measured numerically. Quantitative data comprise all in situ measurements, i.e. permafrost temperatures and active layer thickness (mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, soil temperature profiles). Qualitative data (knowledge products) are observations not based on measurements, such as observations on soils, vegetation, relief, etc.
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The Lamont-Doherty Core Repository (LDCR) contains one of the world’s most unique and important collection of scientific samples from the deep sea. Sediment cores from every major ocean and sea are archived at the Core Repository. The collection contains approximately 72,000 meters of core composed of 9,700 piston cores; 7,000 trigger weight cores; and 2,000 other cores such as box, kasten, and large diameter gravity cores. We also hold 4,000 dredge and grab samples, including a large collection of manganese nodules, many of which were recovered by submersibles. Over 100,000 residues are stored and are available for sampling where core material is expended. In addition to physical samples, a database of the Lamont core collection has been maintained for nearly 50 years and contains information on the geographic location of each collection site, core length, mineralogy and paleontology, lithology, and structure, and more recently, the full text of megascopic descriptions.