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Found 35 result(s)
The PLANKTON*NET data provider at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research is an open access repository for plankton-related information. It covers all types of phytoplankton and zooplankton from marine and freshwater areas. PLANKTON*NET's greatest strength is its comprehensiveness as for the different taxa image information as well as taxonomic descriptions can be archived. PLANKTON*NET also contains a glossary with accompanying images to illustrate the term definitions. PLANKTON*NET therefore presents a vital tool for the preservation of historic data sets as well as the archival of current research results. Because interoperability with international biodiversity data providers (e.g. GBIF) is one of our aims, the architecture behind the new planktonnet@awi repository is observation centric and allows for mulitple assignment of assets (images, references, animations, etc) to any given observation. In addition, images can be grouped in sets and/or assigned tags to satisfy user-specific needs . Sets (and respective images) of relevance to the scientific community and/or general public have been assigned a persistant digital object identifier (DOI) for the purpose of long-term preservation (e.g. set ""Plankton*Net celebrates 50 years of Roman Treaties"", handle: 10013/de.awi.planktonnet.set.495)"
DataBank is a repository that will keep data safe in the long term. It can automatically obtain a Digital Object Indicator (DOI) for each data package, and make the metadata and/or the underlying data searchable and accessible by the wider world.
The Abacus Dataverse Network is the research data repository of the British Columbia Research Libraries' Data Services, a collaboration involving the Data Libraries at Simon Fraser University (SFU), the University of British Columbia (UBC), the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) and the University of Victoria (UVic).
The Health and Medical Care Archive (HMCA) is the data archive of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care in the United States. Operated by the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan, HMCA preserves and disseminates data collected by selected research projects funded by the Foundation and facilitates secondary analyses of the data. Our goal is to increase understanding of health and health care in the United States through secondary analysis of RWJF-supported data collections
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Phaidra Universität Wien, is the innovative whole-university digital asset management system with long-term archiving functions, offers the possibility to archive valuable data university-wide with permanent security and systematic input, offering multilingual access using metadata (data about data), thus providing worldwide availability around the clock. As a constant data pool for administration, research and teaching, resources can be used flexibly, where continual citability allows the exact location and retrieval of prepared digital objects.
The RIT DML captures, distributes and preserves RIT's digital products. Here you can find articles, working papers, preprints, technical reports, conference papers and data sets in various digital formats.
The Texas Data Repository is a platform for publishing and archiving datasets (and other data products) created by faculty, staff, and students at Texas higher education institutions. The repository is built in an open-source application called Dataverse, developed and used by Harvard University. The repository is hosted by the Texas Digital Library, a consortium of academic libraries in Texas with a proven history of providing shared technology services that support secure, reliable access to digital collections of research and scholarship. For a list of TDL participating institutions, please visit: http://tdl.org/members.
ResearchWorks Archive is the University of Washington’s digital repository (also known as “institutional repository”) for disseminating and preserving scholarly work. ResearchWorks Archive can accept any digital file format or content (examples include numerical datasets, photographs and diagrams, working papers, technical reports, pre-prints and post-prints of published articles).
The Australian National University undertake work to collect and publish metadata about research data held by ANU, and in the case of four discipline areas, Earth Sciences, Astronomy, Phenomics and Digital Humanities to develop pipelines and tools to enable the publication of research data using a common and repeatable approach. Aims and outcomes: To identify and describe research data held at ANU, to develop a consistent approach to the publication of metadata on the University's data holdings: Identification and curation of significant orphan data sets that might otherwise be lost or inadvertently destroyed, to develop a culture of data data sharing and data re-use.
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Research Data Online (RDO) provides access to research datasets held at the University of Western Australia. RDO is managed by the University Library. The information about each dataset has been provided by UWA research groups. Information about the datasets in this service is automatically harvested into Research Data Australia (RDA: https://researchdata.ands.org.au/). Language: The user interface language of the research data repository.
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In the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 ‘Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation’ (CRC/TR32, www.tr32.de), funded by the German Research Foundation from 2007 to 2018, a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The so-called CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, www.tr32db.de) is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). The data is resulting from several field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected in the TR32DB.
The Brown Digital Repository (BDR) is a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown.
The Scholars Portal Dataverse network is a repository for research data collected by individuals and organizations associated with Ontario universities. The Dataverse platform makes it easy for researchers to deposit data, create appropriate metadata, and version documents as you work. Access to data and supporting documentation can be controlled down to the file level, and researchers can choose to make content available publicly, only to select individuals, or to keep it completely locked.
ePrints Soton is the University's Research Repository. It contains journal articles, books, PhD theses, conference papers, data, reports, working papers, art exhibitions and more. Where possible, journal articles and conference proceedings are uploaded into ePrints and made open access.
Merritt is a curation repository for the preservation of and access to the digital research data of the ten campus University of California system and external project collaborators. Merritt is supported by the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at the California Digital Library (CDL). While Merritt itself is content agnostic, accepting digital content regardless of domain, format, or structure, it is being used for management of research data, and it forms the basis for a number of domain-specific repositories, such as the ONEShare repository for earth and environmental science and the DataShare repository for life sciences. Merritt provides persistent identifiers, storage replication, fixity audit, complete version history, REST API, a comprehensive metadata catalog for discovery, ATOM-based syndication, and curatorially-defined collections, access control rules, and data use agreements (DUAs). Merritt content upload and download may each be curatorially-designated as public or restricted. Merritt DOIs are provided by UC3's EZID service, which is integrated with DataCite. All DOIs and associated metadata are automatically registered with DataCite and are harvested by Ex Libris PRIMO and Thomson Reuters Data Citation Index (DCI) for high-level discovery. Merritt is also a member node in the DataONE network; curatorially-designated data submitted to Merritt are automatically registered with DataONE for additional replication and federated discovery through the ONEMercury search/browse interface.
The Environmental Data Initiative Repository concentrates on studies of ecological processes that play out at time scales spanning decades to centuries including those of the NSF Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the NSF Macrosystems Biology Program, the NSF Long Term Research in Environmental Biology (LTREB) program, the Organization of Biological Field Stations, and others. The repository hosts data that provide a context to evaluate the nature and pace of ecological change, to interpret its effects, and to forecast the range of future biological responses to change.
CPES provides access to information that relates to mental disorders among the general population. Its primary goal is to collect data about the prevalence of mental disorders and their treatments in adult populations in the United States. It also allows for research related to cultural and ethnic influences on mental health. CPES combines the data collected in three different nationally representative surveys (National Comorbidity Survey Replication, National Survey of American Life, National Latino and Asian American Study).
DR-NTU (Data) is the institutional open access research data repository for Nanyang Technological University (NTU). NTU researchers are encouraged to use DR-NTU (Data) to deposit, publish and archive their final research data in order to make their research data discoverable, accessible and reusable.
EASY is the online archiving system of Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS). EASY offers you access to thousands of datasets in the humanities, the social sciences and other disciplines. EASY can also be used for the online depositing of research data.
ETH Data Archive is ETH Zurich's long-term preservation solution for digital information such as research data, documents or images. It serves as the backbone of data curation and for most of its content, it is a “dark archive” without public access. In this capacity, the ETH Data Archive also archives the content of ETH Zurich’s Research Collection which is the primary repository for members of the university and the first point of contact for publication of data at ETH Zurich. All data that was produced in the context of research at the ETH Zurich, can be published and archived in the Research Collection. In the following cases, a direct data upload into the ETH Data Archive though, has to be considered: • Upload and registration of software code according to ETH transfer’s requirements for Software Disclosure. • A substantial number of files, have to be regularly submitted for long-term archiving and/or publishing and browser-based upload is not an option: the ETH Data Archive may offer automated data and metadata transfers from source applications (e.g. from a LIMS) via API. • Files for a project on a local computer have to be collected and metadata has to be added before uploading the data to the ETH Data Archive: o we provide you with the local file editor docuteam packer. Docuteam packer allows to structure, describe, and organise data for an upload into the ETH Data Archive and the depositor decides when submission is due.
The University of Reading Research Data Archive (the Archive) is a multidisciplinary online service for the registration, preservation and publication of research datasets produced or collected at the University of Reading.
The UA Campus Repository is an institutional repository that facilitates access to the research, creative works, publications and teaching materials of the University by collecting, sharing and archiving content selected and deposited by faculty, researchers, staff and affiliated contributors.
The Integrated Fertility Survey Series (IFSS) is a project of the Population Studies aiming in view to produce a harmonized dataset of U.S. family and fertility surveys spanning five decades (1955-2002). IFSS integrates data from ten underlying component studies of family and fertility encompassing the Growth of American Families (GAF) in 1955 and 1960; National Fertility Surveys (NFS) in 1965 and 1970; as well as National Surveys of Family Growth (NSFG) in 1973, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1995, and 2002. The first release contains harmonized sociodemographic variables for all respondents from all ten component studies, including those related to marital status, race and ethnicity, etc. Thus it provides access to researchers, educators, students, policy makers, and others with a data resource to examine issues related to families and fertility in the United States. Potential users can download original/ harmonized datasets (along with documentation) and numerous analytic tools make it possible to quickly and easily explore the data and obtain information about changes in behaviors and attitudes across time.