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The Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD) is a collection of atomic and molecular transition parameters of astronomical interest. VALD offers tools for selecting subsets of lines for typical astrophysical applications: line identification, preparing for spectroscopic observations, chemical composition and radial velocity measurements, model atmosphere calculations etc.
RAVE (RAdial Velocity Experiment) is a multi-fiber spectroscopic astronomical survey of stars in the Milky Way using the 1.2-m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO). The RAVE collaboration consists of researchers from over 20 institutions around the world and is coordinated by the Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam.As a southern hemisphere survey covering 20,000 square degrees of the sky, RAVE's primary aim is to derive the radial velocity of stars from the observed spectra. Additional information is also derived such as effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, photometric parallax and elemental abundance data for the stars. The survey represents a giant leap forward in our understanding of our own Milky Way galaxy; with RAVE's vast stellar kinematic database the structure, formation and evolution of our Galaxy can be studied.
The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) contains data for radiative transitions and energy levels in atoms and atomic ions. Data are included for observed transitions and energy levels of most of the known chemical elements. ASD contains data on spectral lines with wavelengths from about 0.2 Å (ångströms) to 60 m (meters). For many lines, ASD includes radiative transition probabilities. The energy level data include the ground states and ionization energies for all spectra. Except where noted, the data have been critically evaluated by NIST. For most spectra, wavelengths, transition probabilities, relative intensities, and energy levels are integrated, so that all the available information for a given transition is incorporated under a single listing. For classified lines, in addition to the observed wavelength, ASD includes the Ritz wavelength, which is the wavelength derived from the energy levels. The Ritz wavelengths are usually more precise than the observed ones. Line lists containing classified lines can be ordered by either multiplet (for a given spectrum) or wavelength. For some spectra, ASD includes lists of prominent lines with wavelengths and relative intensities but without energy-level classifications.