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Found 11 result(s)
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
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BRENDA is the main collection of enzyme functional data available to the scientific community worldwide. The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. It is available free of charge for via the internet (http://www.brenda-enzymes.org/) and as an in-house database for commercial users (requests to our distributor Biobase). The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. Some 5000 "different" enzymes are covered. Frequently enzymes with very different properties are included under the same EC number. BRENDA includes biochemical and molecular information on classification, nomenclature, reaction, specificity, functional parameters, occurrence, enzyme structure, application, engineering, stability, disease, isolation, and preparation. The database also provides additional information on ligands, which function as natural or in vitro substrates/products, inhibitors, activating compounds, cofactors, bound metals, and other attributes.
Candida Genome Database, a resource for genomic sequence data and gene and protein information for Candida albicans and related species. CGD is based on the Saccharomyces Genome Database. The Candida Genome Database (CGD) provides online access to genomic sequence data and manually curated functional information about genes and proteins of the human pathogen Candida albicans and related species. C. albicans is the best studied of the human fungal pathogens. It is a common commensal organism of healthy individuals, but can cause debilitating mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans also serves as a model organism for the study of other fungal pathogens.
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
A database for plant breeders and researchers to combine, visualize, and interrogate the wealth of phenotype and genotype data generated by the Triticeae Coordinated Agricultural Project (TCAP).
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GSA is a data repository specialized for archiving raw sequence reads. It supports data generated from a variety of sequencing platforms ranging from Sanger sequencing machines to single-cell sequencing machines and provides data storing and sharing services free of charge for worldwide scientific communities. In addition to raw sequencing data, GSA also accommodates secondary analyzed files in acceptable formats (like BAM, VCF). Its user-friendly web interfaces simplify data entry and submitted data are roughly organized as two parts, viz., Metadata and File, where the former can be further assorted into BioProject, BioSample, Experiment and Run, and the latter contains raw sequence reads.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
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>>>!!!<<<As stated 2017-05-23 Cancer GEnome Mine is no longer available >>>!!!<<< Cancer GEnome Mine is a public database for storing clinical information about tumor samples and microarray data, with emphasis on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and data mining of gene copy number changes.