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Found 30 result(s)
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
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The arctic data archive system (ADS) collects observation data and modeling products obtained by various Japanese research projects and gives researchers to access the results. By centrally managing a wide variety of Arctic observation data, we promote the use of data across multiple disciplines. Researchers use these integrated databases to clarify the mechanisms of environmental change in the atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and cryosphere. That ADS will be provide an opportunity of collaboration between modelers and field scientists, can be expected.
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The Data Portal German Marine Research is a product of the Marine Network for Integrated Data Access (MaNIDA) funded cooperatively by the Helmholtz Association and the affiliated universities. The consortium aims to implement a sustainable e-infrastructure for coherent discovery, view, download and dissemination of marine research data.
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Open Research Data provides quality assessed data and their metadata such as context information on measurement objectives, equipment, methods, testing and investigation areas. The purpose of the repository is to secure quality, integrity and long-term availability of landscape and ecosystem research data as well as to enhance accessibility of free data from ZALF long-term monitoring campaigns, landscape laboratories (Agro-ScapeLabs), field trials and experiments. The Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) explores ecosystems in agricultural landscapes and the development of ecologically and economically viable land use systems. ZALF combines scientific expertise from agricultural science, geosciences, biosciences and socio-economics.
This interface provides access to several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Program databases can be queried based upon user-defined inputs such as geographic region and date range. Each query results in a downloadable, tab- or comma-delimited text file that can be imported to any program (e.g., SAS, Excel, Access) for further analysis. Comments regarding the interface are encouraged. Questions in reference to the data should be addressed to the contact provided on subsequent pages.
This centre receives and archives precipitation chemistry data and complementary information from stations around the world. Data archived by this centre are accessible via connections with the WDCPC database. Freely available data from regional and national programmes with their own Web sites are accessible via links to these sites. The WDCPC is one of six World Data Centres in the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW). The focus on precipitation chemistry is described in the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme. Guidance on all aspects of collecting precipitation for chemical analysis is provided in the Manual for the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme (WMO-GAW Report No. 160).
The Avian Knowledge Network (AKN) is an international network of governmental and non-governmental institutions and individuals linking avian conservation, monitoring and science through efficient data management and coordinated development of useful solutions using best-science practices based on the data.
The Observatory for Environment Research « Experimental Tropical Watersheds » (SO BVET) is INSU-labeled. It is a monitoring tool that aims to increase our knowledge regarding the continental water and biogeochemical cycles and the dynamics of weathering processes in tropical environments. It is also dedicated to the study of anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment. These goals are achieve by the combined use of hydrological, geophysical, mineralogical, geochemical methods and modeling.
The U.S. Antarctic Program Data Center (USAP-DC) supports investigators funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF http://www.nsf.gov/ ) in documenting, preserving, and disseminating their research results. We register datasets in the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD http://gcmd.nasa.gov/portals/amd/ ) to comply with the Antarctic Treaty (http://www.ats.aq/e/ats.htm ); facilitate submission of datasets to long-term archives; and represent the U.S. in Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR http://www.scar.org/data-products/scadm ) activities. USAP-DC is a member of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance (IEDA http://www.iedadata.org/ ) and a partner in the Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium (A2DC http://www.a2dc.org/ ).
TEAM is devoted to monitoring long-term trends in biodiversity, land cover change, climate and ecosystem services in tropical forests. Tropical forests received first billing because of their overwhelming significance to the global biosphere (e.g., their disproportionately large role in global carbon and energy cycles) and because of the extraordinary threats they face. About 50 percent of the species described on Earth, and an even larger proportion of species not yet described, occur in tropical forests. TEAM aims to measure and compare plants, terrestrial mammals, ground-dwelling birds and climate using a standard methodology in a range of tropical forests, from relatively pristine places to those most affected by people. TEAM currently operates in sixteen tropical forest sites across Africa, Asia and Latin America supporting a network of scientists committed to standardized methods of data collection to quantify how plants and animals respond to pressures such as climate change and human encroachment.
The California Coastal Atlas is an experiment in the creation of a new information resource for the description, analysis and understanding of natural and human processes affecting the coast of California.
The USGS Alaska Region has the largest geographic extent of the seven regional units within the USGS and represents a dynamic landscape of great natural wonder. It is a transforming landscape shaped by volcanoes, earthquakes, major rivers, and glaciers and a strategic landscape of yet untapped mineral and energy resources. The Region conducts research to help inform management of the extensive national parks and wildlife refuges of the far north and the international birds, fish, and marine mammals that migrate to these lands and waters; informs national Arctic energy policy through research on the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf; and provides science to understand, help respond to and mitigate impacts from natural hazards. This work is accomplished in part by the Region's two Science Centers headquartered in Anchorage, the Alaska Science Center and the Volcano Science Center.
SeedMe is a result of a decade of onerous experience in preparing and sharing visualization results from supercomputing simulations with many researchers at different geographic locations using different operating systems. It’s been a labor–intensive process, unsupported by useful tools and procedures for sharing information. SeedMe provides a secure and easy-to-use functionality for efficiently and conveniently sharing results that aims to create transformative impact across many scientific domains.
BioVeL is a virtual e-laboratory that supports research on biodiversity issues using large amounts of data from cross-disciplinary sources. BioVeL supports the development and use of workflows to process data. It offers the possibility to either use already made workflows or create own. BioVeL workflows are stored in MyExperiment - Biovel Group http://www.myexperiment.org/groups/643/content. They are underpinned by a range of analytical and data processing functions (generally provided as Web Services or R scripts) to support common biodiversity analysis tasks. You can find the Web Services catalogued in the BiodiversityCatalogue.
TurtleSAT is a new website where communities are mapping the location of freshwater turtles in waterways and wetlands across the country. Australia's unique freshwater turtles are in crisis - their numbers are declining and your help is needed to record where you see turtles in your local area.
OceanSITES is a worldwide system of long-term, deepwater reference stations measuring dozens of variables and monitoring the full depth of the ocean from air-sea interactions down to 5,000 meters. Since 1999, the international OceanSITES science team has shared both data and costs in order to capitalize on the enormous potential of these moorings. The growing network now consists of about 30 surface and 30 subsurface arrays. Satellite telemetry enables near real-time access to OceanSITES data by scientists and the public. OceanSITES moorings are an integral part of the Global Ocean Observing System. They complement satellite imagery and ARGO float data by adding the dimensions of time and depth.
This database is a global archive and describes plant traits from throughout the globe. TRY is a network of vegetation scientists headed by DIVERSITAS, IGBP, iDiv, the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry and an international Advisory Board. About half of the data are geo-referenced, providing a global coverage of more than 8000 measurement sites.
The Forest Service Research Data Archive is an actively curated repository for the long-term preservation and distribution of citable research data sets that are broadly relevant to forest and grassland ecology, and the economic and social interactions of humans with these ecosystems. Most data sets were created by U.S. Forest Service scientists or by scientists funded through the U.S. Forest Service or the U.S. Joint Fire Science Program.
In its 10-year tenure, NCED has made major contributions to the growth of Earth-Surface Dynamics (ESD) through direct research in three Integrated Programs (IP) of Streams, Watersheds and Deltas. These contributions include: Establishment of experimental geomorphology and stratigraphy as a major source of insight in ESD, Integration of quantitative methods from engineering, physics, and applied math into ESD, Advances in the coupling of life, especially vegetation, and landscape dynamics, Integration of a variety of novel methods from stochastic hydrology, including nonlocal transport and multifractal spatial signatures, into ESD, Advances in providing the scientific basis for restoring streams, and Integration of subsurface structure and stratigraphic records into understanding present-day delta dynamics. All data created or compiled by NCED-funded scientists is archived here.
MERMex is focused on the biogeochemical changes that will take place in the Mediterranean Sea due to natural changes as well as the socio-economic impacts, and how they will affect marine ecosystems and biodiversity.
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Australian Waterbird Surveys (AWS) is an information source of waterbird communities around Australia, based on surveys of their diversity and numbers. It relies on rigorous data collection protocols and includes more than 50 waterbird species and up to 30 years of survey data. This open source also includes the extent of flooding of thousands of wetlands observed during our surveys. As a group, waterbirds can be sentinels of the ecological health of our wetlands and rivers. We hope this free information system will help track long-term changes in the environment, provide an assessment tool for individual species, report on our national and international responsibilities and help improve the way we manage our rivers and wetlands. It has been developed with the support of research and government partners.