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Found 8 result(s)
The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite measures the ozone layer in our upper atmosphere—tracking the status of global ozone distributions, including the ‘ozone hole.’ It also monitors ozone levels in the troposphere, the lowest layer of our atmosphere. OMPS extends out 40-year long record ozone layer measurements while also providing improved vertical resolution compared to previous operational instruments. Closer to the ground, OMPS’s measurements of harmful ozone improve air quality monitoring and when combined with cloud predictions; help to create the Ultraviolet Index, a guide to safe levels of sunlight exposure. OMPS has two sensors, both new designs, composed of three advanced hyperspectralimaging spectrometers.The three spectrometers: a downward-looking nadir mapper, nadir profiler and limb profiler. The entire OMPS suite currently fly on board the Suomi NPP spacecraft and are scheduled to fly on the JPSS-2 satellite mission. NASA will provide the OMPS-Limb profiler.
International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) research focuses on climate, environmental monitoring, agriculture, health, water, and economic sectors in Africa, Asia and Pacific, and Latin America and Caribbean. The IRI data library is a freely accessible data repository and analysis tool. IRI allows users to view, manipulate, and download climate-related data sets through a standard web browser.
The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) integrates approximately 100 marine datbases to provide an authoritative and comprehensive list of marine organisms. WoRMS has an editorial system where taxonomic groups are managed by experts responsible for the quality of the information. WorMS register of marine species emerged from the European Register of Marine Species (ERMS) and the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). WoRMS is a contribution to Lifewatch, Catalogue of Life, Encyclopedia of Life, Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Census of Marine Life.
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SAMD is a new repository for Standardized Atmospheric Measurement Data: Central Europe is a region with one of the most comprehensive networks for cloud and precipitation observations worldwide. To unify these observations, establish the infrastructure to store it and make it accessible to the research community is the goal of SAMD. SAMD is one result of the project "High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation in advancing Climate Prediction" (HD(CP)².
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.
Argo is an international programme using autonomous floats to collect temperature, salinity and current data in the ice-free oceans. It is teamed with the Jason ocean satellite series.Argo will soon reach its target of 3000 floats delivering data within 24 hours to researchers and operational centres worldwide. 23 countries contribute floats to Argo and many others help with float deployments. Argo has revolutionized the collection of information from inside the oceans. ARGO Project is organized in regional and national Centers with a Project Office, an Information Center (AIC) and 2 Global Data Centers (GDAC), at the United States and at France. Each DAC submits regularly all its new files to both USGODAE and Coriolis GDACs.The whole Argo data set is available in real time and delayed mode from the global data centres (GDACs). The internet addresses are: • http://www.usgodae.org/argo/argo.html • http://www.argodatamgt.org .
The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological, geological, and chemical components of Earth's environment.
The goal of NGEE–Arctic is to reduce uncertainty in projections of future climate by developing and validating a model representation of permafrost ecosystems and incorporating that representation into Earth system models. The new modeling capabilities will improve our confidence in model projections and will enable scientist to better respond to questions about processes and interactions now and in the future. It also will allow them to better communicate important results concerning climate change to decision makers and the general public. And let's not forget about summer in the Antarctic, which happens during our winter months.