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Found 15 result(s)
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
Country
BExIS is the online data repository and information system of the Biodiversity Exploratories Project (BE). The BE are a German network of biodiversity related working groups from areas such as vegetation and soil science, zoology and forestry. Up to three years after data acquisition, the data use is restricted to members of the BE. Thereafter, the data is usually public available (https://www.bexis.uni-jena.de/PublicData/PublicDataDefault.aspx).
ETH Data Archive is ETH Zurich's long-term preservation solution for digital information such as research data, documents or images. It serves as the backbone of data curation and for most of its content, it is a “dark archive” without public access. In this capacity, the ETH Data Archive also archives the content of ETH Zurich’s Research Collection which is the primary repository for members of the university and the first point of contact for publication of data at ETH Zurich. All data that was produced in the context of research at the ETH Zurich, can be published and archived in the Research Collection. In the following cases, a direct data upload into the ETH Data Archive though, has to be considered: - Upload and registration of software code according to ETH transfer’s requirements for Software Disclosure. - A substantial number of files, have to be regularly submitted for long-term archiving and/or publishing and browser-based upload is not an option: the ETH Data Archive may offer automated data and metadata transfers from source applications (e.g. from a LIMS) via API. - Files for a project on a local computer have to be collected and metadata has to be added before uploading the data to the ETH Data Archive: -- we provide you with the local file editor docuteam packer. Docuteam packer allows to structure, describe, and organise data for an upload into the ETH Data Archive and the depositor decides when submission is due.
Country
GnpIS is a multispecies integrative information system dedicated to plant and fungi pests. It bridges genetic and genomic data, allowing researchers access to both genetic information (e.g. genetic maps, quantitative trait loci, association genetics, markers, polymorphisms, germplasms, phenotypes and genotypes) and genomic data (e.g. genomic sequences, physical maps, genome annotation and expression data) for species of agronomical interest. GnpIS is used by both large international projects and plant science departments at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research. It is regularly improved and released several times per year. GnpIS is accessible through a web portal and allows to browse different types of data either independently through dedicated interfaces or simultaneously using a quick search ('google like search') or advanced search (Biomart, Galaxy, Intermine) tools.
Content type(s)
Launched in November 1995, RADARSAT-1 provided Canada and the world with an operational radar satellite system capable of timely delivery of large amounts of data. Equipped with a powerful synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument, it acquired images of the Earth day or night, in all weather and through cloud cover, smoke and haze. RADARSAT-1 was a Canadian-led project involving the Canadian federal government, the Canadian provinces, the United States, and the private sector. It provided useful information to both commercial and scientific users in such fields as disaster management, interferometry, agriculture, cartography, hydrology, forestry, oceanography, ice studies and coastal monitoring.
Content type(s)
Genome resource samples of wild animals, particularly those of endangered mammalian and avian species, are very difficult to collect. In Korea, many of these animals such as tigers, leopards, bears, wolves, foxes, gorals, and river otters, are either already extinct, long before the Korean biologists had the opportunity to study them, or are near extinction. Therefore, proposal for a systematic collection and preservation of genetic samples of these precious animals was adopted by Korea Science & Engineering Foundation (KOSEF). As an outcome, Conservation Genome Resource Bank for Korean Wildlife (CGRB; www.cgrb.org) was established in 2002 at the College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University as one of the Special Research Materials Bank supported by the Scientific and Research Infrastructure Building Program of KOSEF. CGRB operates in collaboration with Seoul Grand Park Zoo managed by Seoul Metropolitan Government, and has offices and laboratories at both Seoul National University and Seoul Grand Park, where duplicate samples are maintained, thereby assuring a long-term, safe preservation of the samples. Thus, CGRB is the first example of the collaborative scientific infrastructure program between university and zoo in Korea.
INRA is Europe’s top agricultural research institute and the world’s number two centre for the agricultural sciences. Data Inra is offered by INRA as part of its mission to open the results of its research. Data Inra will share research data in relation with food, nutrition, agriculture and environment. It includes experimental, simulation and observation data, omic data, survey and text data. Only data produced by or in collaboration with INRA will be hosted in the repository, but anyone can access the metadata and the open data.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
The goal of NGEE–Arctic is to reduce uncertainty in projections of future climate by developing and validating a model representation of permafrost ecosystems and incorporating that representation into Earth system models. The new modeling capabilities will improve our confidence in model projections and will enable scientist to better respond to questions about processes and interactions now and in the future. It also will allow them to better communicate important results concerning climate change to decision makers and the general public. And let's not forget about summer in the Antarctic, which happens during our winter months.