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Found 12 result(s)
The HEASARC is a multi-mission astronomy archive for the EUV, X-ray, and Gamma ray wave bands. Because EUV, X and Gamma rays cannot reach the Earth's surface it is necessary to place the telescopes and sensors on spacecraft. The HEASARC now holds the data from 25 observatories covering over 30 years of X-ray, extreme-ultraviolet and gamma-ray astronomy. Data and software from many of the older missions were restored by the HEASARC staff. Examples of these archived missions include ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, Compton GRO, HEAO 1, Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2), EUVE, EXOSAT, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, ROSAT, Rossi XTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton.
The Keck Observatory Archive (KOA)is a collaboration between the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) and the W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO). This collaboration is founded by the NASA. KOA has been archiving data from the High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) since August 2004 and data acquired with the Near InfraRed echelle SPECtrograph (NIRSPEC) since May 2010. The archived data extend back to 1994 for HIRES and 1999 for NIRSPEC. The W. M. Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) ingests and curates data from the following instruments: DEIMOS, ESI, HIRES, KI, LRIS, MOSFIRE, NIRC2, and NIRSPEC.
<<<!!!>>> NVO - National Virtual Observatory is closed now <<<!!! >>> The National Virtual Observatory (NVO) was the predecessor of the VAO. It was a research project aimed at developing the technologies that would be used to build an operational Virtual Observatory. With the NVO era now over, a new organization has been funded in its place, with the explicit goal of creating useful tools for users to take advantage of the groundwork laid by the NVO. To carry on with the NVO's goals, we hereby introduce you to the Virtual Astronomical Observatory http://www.usvao.org/
The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership based at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland and a component of the National Space Weather Program. The CCMC provides, to the international research community, access to modern space science simulations. In addition, the CCMC supports the transition to space weather operations of modern space research models.
IRSA is chartered to curate the calibrated science products from NASAs infrared and sub-millimeter missions, including five major large-area/all-sky surveys. IRSA exploits a re-useable architecture to deploy cost-effective archives for customers, including: the Spitzer Space Telescope; the 2MASS and IRAS all-sky surveys; and multi-mission datasets such as COSMOS, WISE and Planck mission
The COordinated Molecular Probe Line Extinction Thermal Emission Survey of Star Forming Regions (COMPLETE) provides a range of data complementary to the Spitzer Legacy Program "From Molecular Cores to Planet Forming Disks" (c2d) for the Perseus, Ophiuchus and Serpens regions. In combination with the Spitzer observations, COMPLETE will allow for detailed analysis and understanding of the physics of star formation on scales from 500 A.U. to 10 pc.
This unique resource covers the entire field of astronomy and astrophysics and this online version includes the full text of over 2,750 articles, plus sophisticated search and retrieval functionality, links to the primary literature, and is frequently updated with new material. An active editorial team, headed by the Encyclopedia's editor-in-chief, Paul Murdin, oversees the continual commissioning, reviewing and loading of new and revised content.In a unique collaboration, Nature Publishing Group and Institute of Physics Publishing published the most extensive and comprehensive reference work in astronomy and astrophysics in both print and online formats. First published as a four volume print edition in 2001, the initial Web version went live in 2002, and contained the original print material and was rapidly supplemented with numerous updates and newly commissioned material. Since July 2006 the Encyclopedia is published solely by Taylor & Francis.
AtomDB is an atomic database useful for X-ray plasma spectral modeling. The current version of AtomDB is primarly used for modeing collisional plasmas, those where hot electrons colliding with astrophysically abundant elements and ions create X-ray emission. However, AtomDB is also useful when modeling absorption by elements and ions or even photoionized plasmas, where X-ray photons (often from a simple power-law source) interacting with elements and ions create complex spectra.
>>>!!!<<< The repository is offline >>>!!!<<< On June 1, 1990 the German X-ray observatory ROSAT started its mission to open a new era in X-ray astronomy. Doubtless, this is the most ambitious project realized up to now in the short history of this young astronomical discipline. Equipped with the largest imaging X-ray telescope ever inserted into an earth orbit ROSAT has provided a tremendous amount of new scientific data and insights.
The NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive serves as the permanent archive for NASA space science mission data. "Space science" means astronomy and astrophysics, solar and space plasma physics, and planetary and lunar science. As permanent archive, NSSDCA teams with NASA's discipline-specific space science "active archives" which provide access to data to researchers and, in some cases, to the general public. NSSDCA also serves as NASA's permanent archive for space physics mission data. It provides access to several geophysical models and to data from some non-NASA mission data. In addition to supporting active space physics and astrophysics researchers, NSSDCA also supports the general public both via several public-interest web-based services (e.g., the Photo Gallery) and via the offline mailing of CD-ROMs, photoprints, and other items.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.
This facility permits selective searches of some atomic data files compiled by R. L. Kurucz (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics). The data provided are: - vacuum wavelength (in nm) [above 200 nm calculated using Edlen, Metrologia, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1966]- air wavelength (in nm) above 200 nm- log(gf), - E [in cm-1], j, parity, and configuration for the levels (lower, upper), - information regarding the source of the data. CD-ROM 18 contains the spectrum synthesis programs ATLAS7V, SYNTHE, SPECTRV, ROTATE, BROADEN, PLOTSYN, etc. and sample runs found in directory PROGRAMS; Atomic line data files BELLHEAVY.DAT, BELLLIGHT.DAT, GFIRONLAB.DAT, GULLIVER.DAT, NLTELINES.DAT, GFIRONQ.DAT, obsolete, merged into GFALL, found in directory LINELISTS: Molecular line data files C2AX.ASC, C2BA.ASC, C2DA.ASC, C2EA.ASC, CNAX.ASC, CNBX.ASC, COAX.ASC, COXX.ASC, H2.ASC, HYDRIDES.ASC, SIOAX.ASC, SIOEX.ASC, SIOXX.ASC, found in directory LINELISTS; and my solar flux atlas for test calculations SOLARFLUX.ASC.