Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 27 result(s)
UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot is the manually annotated and reviewed section of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB). It is a high quality annotated and non-redundant protein sequence database, which brings together experimental results, computed features and scientific conclusions. Since 2002, it is maintained by the UniProt consortium and is accessible via the UniProt website.
EMBL-EBI provides freely available data from life science experiments covering the full spectrum of molecular biology.The EBI Metagenomics service is an automated pipeline for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data that aims to provide insights into the phylogenetic diversity as well as the functional and metabolic potential of a sample.
VectorBase provides data on arthropod vectors of human pathogens. Sequence data, gene expression data, images, population data, and insecticide resistance data for arthropod vectors are available for download. VectorBase also offers genome browser, gene expression and microarray repository, and BLAST searches for all VectorBase genomes. VectorBase Genomes include Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ixodes scapularis, Pediculus humanus, Rhodnius prolixus. VectorBase is one the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRC) projects which is funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAID).
The aim of FlyReactome, based in the Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, is to develop a curated repository for Drosophila melanogaster pathways and reactions. The information in this database is authored by biological researchers with expertise in their fields, maintained by the FlyReactome staff.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
STRING is a database of known and predicted protein interactions. The interactions include direct (physical) and indirect (functional) associations; they are derived from four sources: - Genomic Context - High-throughput Experiments - (Conserved) Coexpression - Previous Knowledge STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data from these sources for a large number of organisms, and transfers information between these organisms where applicable.
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) assigned unique gene symbols and names to over 35,000 human loci, of which around 19,000 are protein coding. This curated online repository of HGNC-approved gene nomenclature and associated resources includes links to genomic, proteomic and phenotypic information, as well as dedicated gene family pages.
The Database of Genomic Variants archive provides curated archiving and distribution of publicly available genomic structural variants. Direct submissions are accepted as well as published data. The DGVa is the primary supplier of data to the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV) (hosted by The Centre for Applied Genomics in Toronto, Canada).
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
PANDIT is a collection of multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees. It contains corresponding amino acid and nucleotide sequence alignments, with trees inferred from each alignment. PANDIT is based on the Pfam database (Protein families database of alignments and HMMs), and includes the seed amino acid alignments of most families in the Pfam-A database. DNA sequences for as many members of each family as possible are extracted from the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and aligned according to the amino acid alignment. PANDIT also contains a further copy of the amino acid alignments, restricted to the sequences for which DNA sequences were found.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
virus mentha archives evidence about viral interactions collected from different sources and presents these data in a complete and comprehensive way. Its data comes from manually curated protein-protein interaction databases that have adhered to the IMEx consortium. virus mentha is a resource that offers a series of tools to analyse selected proteins in the context of a network of interactions. Protein interaction databases archive protein-protein interaction (PPI) information from published articles. However, no database alone has sufficient literature coverage to offer a complete resource to investigate "the interactome". virus mentha's approach generates every week a consistent interactome (graph). Most importantly, the procedure assigns to each interaction a reliability score that takes into account all the supporting evidence. virus mentha offers direct access to viral families such as: Orthomyxoviridae, Orthoretrovirinae and Herpesviridae plus, it offers the unique possibility of searching by host organism. The website and the graphical application are designed to make the data stored in virus mentha accessible and analysable to all users.virus mentha superseeds VirusMINT. The Source databases are: MINT, DIP, IntAct, MatrixDB, BioGRID.
The Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR) is a collection of databases and tools designed to help researchers study the genetics of human ageing using modern approaches such as functional genomics, network analyses, systems biology and evolutionary analyses.
I2D (Interologous Interaction Database) is an on-line database of known and predicted mammalian and eukaryotic protein-protein interactions. It has been built by mapping high-throughput (HTP) data between species. Thus, until experimentally verified, these interactions should be considered "predictions". It remains one of the most comprehensive sources of known and predicted eukaryotic PPI. I2D includes data for S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melonogaster, R. norvegicus, M. musculus, and H. sapiens.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
DOMINO is an open-access database comprising more than 3900 annotated experiments describing interactions mediated by protein-interaction domains. The curation effort aims at covering the interactions mediated by the following domains (SH3, SH2, 14-3-3, PDZ, PTB, WW, EVH, VHS, FHA, EH, FF, BRCT, Bromo, Chromo, GYF). The interactions deposited in DOMINO are annotated according to the PSI MI standard and can be easily analyzed in the context of the global protein interaction network as downloaded from major interaction databases like MINT, INTACT, DIP, MIPS/MPACT. DOMINO can be searched with a versatile search tool and the interaction networks can be visualized with a convenient graphic display applet that explicitly identifies the domains/sites involved in the interactions.
The Ensembl genome annotation system, developed jointly by the EBI and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has been used for the annotation, analysis and display of vertebrate genomes since 2000. Since 2009, the Ensembl site has been complemented by the creation of five new sites, for bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and invertebrate metazoa, enabling users to use a single collection of (interactive and programatic) interfaces for accessing and comparing genome-scale data from species of scientific interest from across the taxonomy. In each domain, we aim to bring the integrative power of Ensembl tools for comparative analysis, data mining and visualisation across genomes of scientific interest, working in collaboration with scientific communities to improve and deepen genome annotation and interpretation.