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Found 7 result(s)
SSDA Dataverse is one of the archiving opportunities of SSDA, the others are: Data can be archived by SSDA itself (http://dataarchives.ss.ucla.edu/index.html) or by ICPSR or by UCLA Library or by California Digital Library. The Social Science Data Archives serves the UCLA campus as an archive of faculty and graduate student survey research. We provide long term storage of data files and documentation. We ensure that the data are useable in the future by migrating files to new operating systems. We follow government standards and archival best practices. The mission of the Social Science Data Archive has been and continues to be to provide a foundation for social science research with faculty support throughout an entire research project involving original data collection or the reuse of publicly available studies. Data Archive staff and researchers work as partners throughout all stages of the research process, beginning when a hypothesis or area of study is being developed, during grant and funding activities, while data collection and/or analysis is ongoing, and finally in long term preservation of research results. Our role is to provide a collaborative environment where the focus is on understanding the nature and scope of research approach and management of research output throughout the entire life cycle of the project. Instructional support, especially support that links research with instruction is also a mainstay of operations.
The figshare service for Monash University, Australia was launched in 2014 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing Metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
Brock University Dataverse, housed under the Ontario Council of University Libraries’ Scholars Portal Dataverse, is the central online repository for research data at Brock University.
DR-NTU (Data) is the institutional open access research data repository for Nanyang Technological University (NTU). NTU researchers are encouraged to use DR-NTU (Data) to deposit, publish and archive their final research data in order to make their research data discoverable, accessible and reusable.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
The Scholars Portal Dataverse network is a repository for research data collected by individuals and organizations associated with Ontario universities. The Dataverse platform makes it easy for researchers to deposit data, create appropriate metadata, and version documents as you work. Access to data and supporting documentation can be controlled down to the file level, and researchers can choose to make content available publicly, only to select individuals, or to keep it completely locked.
The gift of the Stowell Datasets, a digital archive of psychographic data, to the College of Liberal Arts (and continued gift of new datasets) provide a unique opportunity for WSU to facilitate access to a valuable research resource. The datasets include over 350 individual major media market surveys (CATI, Random Digit Dialing telephone surveys) collected over the period 1989-2001 and feature approximately n=1,000+ respondents for each market for each year.