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Found 13 result(s)
Online storage, sharing and registration of research data, during the research period and up to the prescribed term of ten years after its completion. DataverseNL is a shared service provided by participating institutions and DANS.
The figshare service for Monash University, Australia was launched in 2014 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing Metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
DR-NTU (Data) is the institutional open access research data repository for Nanyang Technological University (NTU). NTU researchers are encouraged to use DR-NTU (Data) to deposit, publish and archive their final research data in order to make their research data discoverable, accessible and reusable.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
The Portal aims to serve as a unique access point to timely, comprehensive migration statistics and reliable information about migration data globally. The site is designed to help policy makers, national statistics officers, journalists and the general public interested in the field of migration to navigate the increasingly complex landscape of international migration data, currently scattered across different organisations and agencies. Especially in critical times, such as those faced today, it is essential to ensure that responses to migration are based on sound facts and accurate analysis. By making the evidence about migration issues accessible and easy to understand, the Portal aims to contribute to a more informed public debate. The Portal was launched in December 2017 and is managed and developed by IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC), with the guidance of its Advisory Board, and was supported in its conception by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). The Portal is supported financially by the Governments of Germany, the United States of America and the UK Department for International Development (DFID).
The Comparative Agendas Project (CAP) assembles and codes information on the policy processes of governments from around the world. CAP enables scholars, students, policy-makers and the media to investigate trends in policy-making across time and between countries. It classifies policy activities into a single, universal and consistent coding scheme.
Additionally to the institutional repository, current St. Edward's faculty have the option of uploading their work directly to their own SEU accounts on stedwards.figshare.com. Projects created on Figshare will automatically be published on this website as well. For more information, please see documentation
Mulce (MUltimodal contextualized Learner Corpus Exchange) is a research project supported by the National Research Agency (ANR programme: "Corpus and Tools in the Humanities", ANR-06-CORP-006). A teaching corpus (LETEC - Learning and Teaching Corpora) combines a systematic and structured data set, particularly of interactional data, and traces left by a training course experimentation, conducted partially or completely online and completed by additional technical, human, pedagogical and scientific information to enable the data to be analysed in context.
The Language Archive is storing a lot of unique material, from a large variety of languages worldwide, which is recorded and analyzed by researchers from different linguistic disciplines. Data creation, management and exploration tools. Archiving and software expertise for the Digital Humanities.