Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 42 result(s)
Country
The World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS) is a large database of structural (phonological, grammatical, lexical) properties of languages gathered from descriptive materials (such as reference grammars) by a team of 55 authors (many of them the leading authorities on the subject).
Codex Sinaiticus is one of the most important books in the world. Handwritten well over 1600 years ago, the manuscript contains the Christian Bible in Greek, including the oldest complete copy of the New Testament. The Codex Sinaiticus Project is an international collaboration to reunite the entire manuscript in digital form and make it accessible to a global audience for the first time. Drawing on the expertise of leading scholars, conservators and curators, the Project gives everyone the opportunity to connect directly with this famous manuscript.
Currently, the IMS repository focuses on resources provided by the Institute for Natural Language Processing in Stuttgart (IMS) and other CLARIN-D related institutions such as the local Collaborative Research Centre 732 (SFB 732) as well as institutions and/or organizations that belong to the CLARIN-D extended scientific community. Comprehensive guidelines and workflows for submission by external contributors are being compiled based on the experiences in archiving such in-house resources.
OLAC, the Open Language Archives Community, is an international partnership of institutions and individuals who are creating a worldwide virtual library of language resources by: (i) developing consensus on best current practice for the digital archiving of language resources, and (ii) developing a network of interoperating repositories and services for housing and accessing such resources.
CHILDES is the child language component of the TalkBank system. TalkBank is a system for sharing and studying conversational interactions.
The Language Bank features text and speech corpora with different kinds of annotations in over 60 languages. There is also a selection of tools for working with them, from linguistic analyzers to programming environments. Corpora are also available via web interfaces, and users can be allowed to download some of them. The IP holders can monitor the use of their resources and view user statistics.
The Data and Service Center for the Humanities (DaSCH) is an institution of the Swiss Academy of Humanities and Social Sciences (SAHSS) financed by the State Secretariat for Eduction, Research and Innovation (SERI). The primary goals of the DaSCH are - Preservation of research data in the humanities and their long-term data curation. - Ensuring permanent access to research data in order to make it available for further research and thus facilitating the reuse of existing research data in future research. - Providing services for researchers to assist them with the data management plan. - Encouraging the digital networking of databases created in Switzerland or in other countries. - Collaboration and networking with other institutions on digital literacy. The services of the DaSCH are available to all researchers and projects in Switzerland which work in the the domain of the Humanities and have to deal with digital information as well to other research institutions in Switzerland.
Country
Arquivo.pt is a research infrastructure that preserves millions of files collected from the web since 1996 and provides a public search service over this information. It contains information in several languages. Periodically it collects and stores information published on the web. Then, it processes the collect data to make it searchable, providing a “Google-like” service that enables searching the past web (English user interface available at www.archive.pt). This preservation workflow is performed through a large-scale distributed information system and can also accessed through API.
The Eurac Research CLARIN Centre (ERCC) is a dedicated repository for language data. It is hosted by the Institute for Applied Linguistics (IAL) at Eurac Research, a private research centre based in Bolzano, South Tyrol. The Centre is part of the Europe-wide CLARIN infrastructure, which means that it follows well-defined international standards for (meta)data and procedures and is well-embedded in the wider European Linguistics infrastructure. The repository hosts data collected at the IAL, but is also open for data deposits from external collaborators.
LINDAT/CLARIN is designed as a Czech “node” of Clarin ERIC (Common Language Resources and Technology Infrastructure). It also supports the goals of the META-NET language technology network. Both networks aim at collection, annotation, development and free sharing of language data and basic technologies between institutions and individuals both in science and in all types of research. The Clarin ERIC infrastructural project is more focused on humanities, while META-NET aims at the development of language technologies and applications. The data stored in the repository are already being used in scientific publications in the Czech Republic.
D-PLACE contains cultural, linguistic, environmental and geographic information for over 1400 human ‘societies’. A ‘society’ in D-PLACE represents a group of people in a particular locality, who often share a language and cultural identity. All cultural descriptions are tagged with the date to which they refer and with the ethnographic sources that provided the descriptions. The majority of the cultural descriptions in D-PLACE are based on ethnographic work carried out in the 19th and early-20th centuries (pre-1950).
Content type(s)
MICASE provides a collection of transcripts of academic speech events recorded at the University of Michigan. The original DAT audiotapes are held in the English Language Institute and may be consulted by bona fide researchers under special arrangements
Country
The Australian National Corpus collates and provides access to assorted examples of Australian English text, transcriptions, audio and audio-visual materials. Text analysis tools are embedded in the interface allowing analysis and downloads in *.CSV format.
The TextGrid Repository is a digital preservation archive for human sciences research data. It offers an extensive searchable and adaptable corpus of XML/TEI encoded texts, pictures and databases. Amongst the continuously growing corpus is the Digital Library of TextGrid, which consists of works of more than 600 authors of German fiction (prose, verse and drama), as well as nonfiction from the beginning of the printing press to the early 20th century. The files are saved in different output formats (XML, ePub, PDF), published and made searchable. Different tools e.g. viewing or quantitative text-analysis tools can be used for visualization or to further research the text. The TextGrid Repository is part of the virtual research environment TextGrid, which besides offering digital preservation also offers open-source software for collaborative creations and publications of e.g. digital editions that are based on XML/TEI.
The German Text Archive (Deutsches Textarchiv, DTA) presents online a selection of key German-language works in various disciplines from the 17th to 19th centuries. The electronic full-texts are indexed linguistically and the search facilities tolerate a range of spelling variants. The DTA presents German-language printed works from around 1650 to 1900 as full text and as digital facsimile. The selection of texts was made on the basis of lexicographical criteria and includes scientific or scholarly texts, texts from everyday life, and literary works. The digitalisation was made from the first edition of each work. Using the digital images of these editions, the text was first typed up manually twice (‘double keying’). To represent the structure of the text, the electronic full-text was encoded in conformity with the XML standard TEI P5. The next stages complete the linguistic analysis, i.e. the text is tokenised, lemmatised, and the parts of speech are annotated. The DTA thus presents a linguistically analysed, historical full-text corpus, available for a range of questions in corpus linguistics. Thanks to the interdisciplinary nature of the DTA Corpus, it also offers valuable source-texts for neighbouring disciplines in the humanities, and for scientists, legal scholars and economists.
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
As a member of SWE-CLARIN, the Humanities Lab will provide tools and expertise related to language archiving, corpus and (meta)data management, with a continued emphasis on multimodal corpora, many of which contain Swedish resources, but also other (often endangered) languages, multilingual or learner corpora. As a CLARIN K-centre we provide advice on multimodal and sensor-based methods, including EEG, eye-tracking, articulography, virtual reality, motion capture, av-recording. Current work targets automatic data retrieval from multimodal data sets, as well as the linking of measurement data (e.g. EEG, fMRI) or geo-demographic data (GIS, GPS) to language data (audio, video, text, annotations). We also provide assistance with speech and language technology related matters to various projects. A primary resource in the Lab is The Humanities Lab corpus server, containing a varied set of multimodal language corpora with standardised metadata and linked layers of annotations and other resources.
Språkbanken (the Swedish Language Bank) was established in 1975 as a national center located in the Faculty of Arts, University of Gothenburg. Alléns groundbreaking corpus linguistic research resulted in the creation of one of the first large electronic text corpora in another language than English, with one million words of newspaper text. The task of Språkbanken is to collect, develop, and store (Swedish) text corpora, and to make linguistic data extracted from the corpora available to researchers and to the public.
>>>>>!!!<<<<< As of 01/12/2015, deposit of data on SLDR website will be suspended to allow the public opening of Ortolang platform https://www.ortolang.fr/#/market/home .>>>>>!!!<<<<<
The Language Archive Cologne (LAC) is a research data repository for the linguistics and all humanities disciplines working with audiovisual data. The archive forms a cluster of the Data Center for Humanities in cooperation with the Institute of Linguistics of the University of Cologne. The LAC is an archive for language resources, which is freely available via a web-based access. In addition, concrete technical and methodological advice is offered in the research data cycle - from the collection of the data, their preparation and archiving, to publication and reuse.
Clarin.dk is a Danish IT infrastructure intended for use by humanities scholars. The infrastructure includes digitized research material in the form of written and spoken texts, audio and video records, lexical resources and tools. Part of the resources collected or converted to other formats as part of the project. Other resources developed or collected in other projects and made available to researchers through Clarin.dk. The website is regularly updated with new materials and tools. The vision is to create the humanities researcher's toolbox through the creation of resources with associated tools and integrating resources together in a web-based electronic research environment provided for humanities researchers. Such access to resources and tools will allow scientists unprecedented opportunities and will also help to enhance their ability to participate in European collaborative projects. The Danish CLARIN project will eventually generate better conditions for Danish language technology research and development.
Content type(s)
The Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities (BBAW) is a CLARIN partner institution and has been an officially certified CLARIN service center since June 20th, 2013. The CLARIN center at the BBAW focuses on historical text corpora (predominantly provided by the 'Deutsches Textarchiv'/German Text Archive, DTA) as well as on lexical resources (e.g. dictionaries provided by the 'Digitales Wörterbuch der Deutschen Sprache'/Digital Dictionary of the German Language, DWDS).
The Alaska Native Language Archive houses documentation of the various Native languages of Alaska and helps to preserve and cultivate this unique heritage for future generations. As the premier repository worldwide for information relating to the Native languages of Alaska, the Archive serves researchers, teachers and students, as well as members of the broader community. The collection includes both published and unpublished materials in or on all of the Alaska Native languages and related languages. The collection has enduring cultural, historic, and intellectual value, particularly for Alaska Native language speakers and their descendants