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As with most biomedical databases, the first step is to identify relevant data from the research community. The Monarch Initiative is focused primarily on phenotype-related resources. We bring in data associated with those phenotypes so that our users can begin to make connections among other biological entities of interest. We import data from a variety of data sources. With many resources integrated into a single database, we can join across the various data sources to produce integrated views. We have started with the big players including ClinVar and OMIM, but are equally interested in boutique databases. You can learn more about the sources of data that populate our system from our data sources page https://monarchinitiative.org/about/sources.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
FAIRsharing is a web-based, searchable portal of three interlinked registries, containing both in-house and crowdsourced manually curated descriptions of standards, databases and data policies, combined with an integrated view across all three types of resource. By registering your resource on FAIRsharing, you not only gain credit for your work, but you increase its visibility outside of your direct domain, so reducing the potential for unnecessary reinvention and proliferation of standards and databases.
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MTD is focused on mammalian transcriptomes with a current version that contains data from humans, mice, rats and pigs. Regarding the core features, the MTD browses genes based on their neighboring genomic coordinates or joint KEGG pathway and provides expression information on exons, transcripts, and genes by integrating them into a genome browser. We developed a novel nomenclature for each transcript that considers its genomic position and transcriptional features.
4DGenome is a public database that archives and disseminates chromatin interaction data. Currently, 4DGenome contains over 8,038,248 interactions curated from both experimental studies (high throughput and individual studies) and computational predictions. It covers five organisms, Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Plasmodium falciparum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
NetPath is currently one of the largest open-source repository of human signaling pathways that is all set to become a community standard to meet the challenges in functional genomics and systems biology. Signaling networks are the key to deciphering many of the complex networks that govern the machinery inside the cell. Several signaling molecules play an important role in disease processes that are a direct result of their altered functioning and are now recognized as potential therapeutic targets. Understanding how to restore the proper functioning of these pathways that have become deregulated in disease, is needed for accelerating biomedical research. This resource is aimed at demystifying the biological pathways and highlights the key relationships and connections between them. Apart from this, pathways provide a way of reducing the dimensionality of high throughput data, by grouping thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites at functional level into just several hundreds of pathways for an experiment. Identifying the active pathways that differ between two conditions can have more explanatory power than just a simple list of differentially expressed genes and proteins.
The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) maintains a database of genetic and molecular biology data for the model higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana . Data available from TAIR includes the complete genome sequence along with gene structure, gene product information, metabolism, gene expression, DNA and seed stocks, genome maps, genetic and physical markers, publications, and information about the Arabidopsis research community. Gene product function data is updated every two weeks from the latest published research literature and community data submissions. Gene structures are updated 1-2 times per year using computational and manual methods as well as community submissions of new and updated genes. TAIR also provides extensive linkouts from our data pages to other Arabidopsis resources.