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The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a radio telescope with around one million square metres of collecting area, designed to study the Universe with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. The SKA is not a single telescope, but a collection of various types of antennas, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA will be used to answer fundamental questions of science and about the laws of nature, such as: how did the Universe, and the stars and galaxies contained in it, form and evolve? Was Einstein’s theory of relativity correct? What is the nature of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’? What is the origin of cosmic magnetism? Is there life somewhere else in the Universe?
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This study assessed differences in avian biodiversity across different forest age-classes, including mature stands (> 100 years), in a managed, mixed-species eucalypt forest located in Gippsland, south-eastern Australia. Avian surveys and detailed habitat measurements were initially carried out in 50 two hectare stands ranging in age from 100 years. Extensive wildfire which occurred during the study reduced the number of sites to 28 (seven in each of four age classes) upon which analyses and inferences were made. Mature vegetation (> 100 years) had the greatest richness, abundance and biomass of birds. Key ecological resources, such as tree-hollows for nesting, generally occurred mostly in stands > 60 years. There were quantum increases in all measures of avian biodiversity in mature stands (> 100 years). The visualisation of the survey data is part of an interoperable web-GIS maintained by the Centre for eResearch and Digital Innovation (CeRDI) at Federation University Australia (FedUni).
The Australian Drosophila Ecology and Evolution Resource (ADEER) from the Hoffmann lab and other contributors is a nationally significant life science collection. The Drosophila Clinal Data Collection contains data on populations along the eastern coast of Australia. It remains an excellent resource for understanding past and future evolutionary responses to climate change. The Drosophila Genomic Data Collection hosts Drosophila genomes sequenced as part of the Genomic Basis for Adaptation to Climate Change Project. 23 genomes have been sequenced as part of this project. Currently assemblies and annotations are available for Drosophila birchii, D. bunnanda, D. hydei, and D. repleta. The Drosophila Species Distribution Data Collection contains distribution data of nine drosophilid species that have been collected in Australia by the Hoffmann lab and other research groups between 1924 and 2005. More than 300 drosophilid species have been identified in the tropical and temperate forests located on the east coast of Australia. Many species are restricted to the tropics, a few are temperate specialists, and some have broad distributions across climatic regions. Their varied distribution along the tropical - temperate cline provide a powerful tool for studying climate adaptation and species distribution limits.
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The compendium of crop Proteins with Annotate Locations (cropPAL) is a comprehensive collection of subcellular location annotation for proteins of hordeum vulgare (barley), tritium aestivum (wheat), oryza sativa (rice) and zea mays (corn) derived from published experimental localization studies and precompiled bioinformatic predictions.
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The Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) is a tropical marine research center. Data are available on topics including reef weather, sea temperature, cyclones, and water quality.