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Found 10 result(s)
The CiardRING is a global directory of web-based information services and datasets for agricultural research for development (ARD). It is the principal tool created through the CIARD initiative to allow information providers to register their services and datasets in various categories and so facilitate the discovery of sources of agriculture-related information across the world. The RING aims to provide an infrastructure to improve the accessibility of the outputs of agricultural research and of information relevant to agriculture.
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
Country
The IOWDB was designed for the particular requirements of the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research. It is aimed at the management of historical and recent measurement of the IOW (to some extend of other data, too) and to provide them in a user-friendly way via the research tool ODIN (Oceanographic Database research with Interactive Navigation).
The GDR is the submission point for all data collected from researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office. It was established to receive, manage and make available all geothermal-relevant data generated from projects funded by the DOE Geothermal Technologies Office. This includes data from GTO-funded projects associated with any portion of the geothermal project life-cycle (exploration, development, operation), as well as data produced by GTO-funded research.
EartH2Observe brings together the findings from European FP projects DEWFORA, GLOWASIS, WATCH, GEOWOW and others. It will integrate available global earth observations (EO), in-situ datasets and models and will construct a global water resources re-analysis dataset of significant length (several decades). The resulting data will allow for improved insights on the full extent of available water and existing pressures on global water resources in all parts of the water cycle. The project will support efficient and globally consistent water management and decision making by providing comprehensive multi-scale (regional, continental and global) water resources observations. It will test new EO data sources, extend existing processing algorithms and combine data from multiple satellite missions in order to improve the overall resolution and reliability of EO data included in the re-analysis dataset. The resulting datasets will be made available through an open Water Cycle Integrator data portal https://wci.earth2observe.eu/ : the European contribution to the GEOSS/WCI approach. The datasets will be downscaled for application in case-studies at regional and local levels, and optimized based on identified European and local needs supporting water management and decision making . Actual data access: https://wci.earth2observe.eu/data/group/earth2observe
HydroShare is a system operated by The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science Inc. (CUAHSI) that enables users to share and publish data and models in a variety of flexible formats, and to make this information available in a citable, shareable and discoverable manner. HydroShare includes a repository for data and models, and tools (web apps) that can act on content in HydroShare providing users with a gateway to high performance computing and computing in the cloud. With HydroShare you can: share data and models with colleagues; manage access to shared content; share, access, visualize, and manipulate a broad set of hydrologic data types and models; publish data and models and obtain a citable digital object identifier (DOI); aggregate resources into collections; discover and access data and models published by others; use the web services application programming interface (API) to programmatically access resources; and use integrated web applications to visualize, analyze and run models with data in HydroShare.
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The NCI National Research Data Collection is Australia’s largest collection of research data, encompassing more than 10 PB of nationally and internationally significant datasets.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
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The eAtlas is a website, mapping system and set of data visualisation tools for presenting research data in an accessible form that promotes greater use of this information. The eAtlas will serve as the primary data and knowledge repository for all NERP Tropical Ecosystems Hub projects, which focus on the on the Great Barrier Reef, Wet Tropics rainforest and Torres Strait. The eAtlas will capture and record research outcomes and make them available to research-users in a timely, readily accessible manner. It will host meta-data records and provide an enduring repository for raw data. It will also develop and host web visualisations to view information using a simple and intuitive interface. This will assist scientists with data discovery and allow environmental managers to access and investigate research data.
The KNB Data Repository is an international repository intended to facilitate ecological, environmental and earth science research in the broadest senses. For scientists, the KNB Data Repository is an efficient way to share, discover, access and interpret complex ecological, environmental, earth science, and sociological data and the software used to create and manage those data. Due to rich contextual information provided with data in the KNB, scientists are able to integrate and analyze data with less effort. The data originate from a highly-distributed set of field stations, laboratories, research sites, and individual researchers. The KNB supports rich, detailed metadata to promote data discovery as well as automated and manual integration of data into new projects. The KNB supports a rich set of modern repository services, including the ability to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) so data sets can be confidently referenced in any publication, the ability to track the versions of datasets as they evolve through time, and metadata to establish the provenance relationships between source and derived data.