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Found 17 result(s)
Academic Commons provides open, persistent access to the scholarship produced by researchers at Columbia University, Barnard College, Jewish Theological Seminary, Teachers College, and Union Theological Seminary. Academic Commons is a program of the Columbia University Libraries. Academic Commons accepts articles, dissertations, research data, presentations, working papers, videos, and more.
Climate Data Record (CDR) is a time series of measurements of sufficient length, consistency and continuity to determine climate variability and change. The fundamental CDRs include sensor data, such as calibrated radiances and brightness temperatures, that scientists have improved and quality-controlled along with the data used to calibrate them. The thematic CDRs include geophysical variables derived from the fundamental CDRs, such as sea surface temperature and sea ice concentration, and they are specific to various disciplines.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
This website is a portal that enables access to multi-Terabyte turbulence databases. The data reside on several nodes and disks on our database cluster computer and are stored in small 3D subcubes. Positions are indexed using a Z-curve for efficient access.
CORE is a full-text, interdisciplinary, non-profit social repository designed to increase the impact of work in the Humanities. Commons Open Repository Exchange, a library-quality repository for sharing, discovering, retrieving, and archiving digital work. CORE provides Humanities Commons members with a permanent, open access storage facility for their scholarly output, facilitating maximum discoverability and encouraging peer feedback.
Arch is an open access repository for the research and scholarly output of Northwestern University. Log in with your NetID to deposit, describe, and organize your research for public access and long-term preservation. We'll use our expertise to help you curate, share, and preserve your work.
The Energy Data eXchange (EDX) is an online collection of capabilities and resources that advance research and customize energy-related needs. EDX is developed and maintained by NETL-RIC researchers and technical computing teams to support private collaboration for ongoing research efforts, and tech transfer of finalized DOE NETL research products. EDX supports NETL-affiliated research by: Coordinating historical and current data and information from a wide variety of sources to facilitate access to research that crosscuts multiple NETL projects/programs; Providing external access to technical products and data published by NETL-affiliated research teams; Collaborating with a variety of organizations and institutions in a secure environment through EDX’s ;Collaborative Workspaces
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
The KNB Data Repository is an international repository intended to facilitate ecological, environmental and earth science research in the broadest senses. For scientists, the KNB Data Repository is an efficient way to share, discover, access and interpret complex ecological, environmental, earth science, and sociological data and the software used to create and manage those data. Due to rich contextual information provided with data in the KNB, scientists are able to integrate and analyze data with less effort. The data originate from a highly-distributed set of field stations, laboratories, research sites, and individual researchers. The KNB supports rich, detailed metadata to promote data discovery as well as automated and manual integration of data into new projects. The KNB supports a rich set of modern repository services, including the ability to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) so data sets can be confidently referenced in any publication, the ability to track the versions of datasets as they evolve through time, and metadata to establish the provenance relationships between source and derived data.
Libra Data is a place for UVA researchers to share data publicly. It is UVA's local instance of Dataverse. Libra Data is part of the Libra Scholarly Repository suite of services which includes works of UVA scholarship such as articles, books, theses, and data.
The Odum Institute Dataverse Network provides access to data collections curated by the Odum Institute as well as collections owned by other institutions and individual scholars. You can search across or browse any of these dataverses listed below. You may also create your own branded dataverse to manage and provide access to your data.