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Established in 1965, the CSD is the world’s repository for small-molecule organic and metal-organic crystal structures. Containing the results of over half-a-million x-ray and neutron diffraction analyses this unique database of accurate 3D structures has become an essential resource to scientists around the world. The CSD records bibliographic, chemical and crystallographic information for:organic molecules, metal-organic compounds whose 3D structures have been determined using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction. The CSD records results of: single crystal studies, powder diffraction studies which yield 3D atomic coordinate data for at least all non-H atoms. In some cases the CCDC is unable to obtain coordinates, and incomplete entries are archived to the CSD. The CSD includes crystal structure data arising from: publications in the open literature. Private Communications to the CSD (via direct data deposition). The CSD also contains directly deposited data that are not available anywhere else.
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The CDPP is the French national data centre for natural plasmas of the solar system. The CDPP assures the long term preservation of data obtained primarily from instruments built using French resources, and renders them readily accessible and exploitable by the international community. The CDPP also provides services to enable on-line data analysis (AMDA), 3D data visualization in context (3DView), and a propagation tool which bridges solar perturbations to in-situ measurements. The CDPP is involved in the development of interoperability, participates in several Virtual Observatory projects, and supports data distribution for scientific missions (Solar Orbiter, JUICE).
----<<<< This repository is no longer available. This record is out-dated !!!!! >>>>> ----- Science3D is an Open Access project to archive and curate scientific data and make them available to everyone interested in scientific endeavours. Science3D focusses mainly on 3D tomography data from biological samples, simply because theses object make it comparably easy to understand the concepts and techniques. The data come primarily from the imaging beamlines of the Helmholtz Center Geesthacht (HZG), which make use of the uniquely bright and coherent X-rays of the Petra3 synchrotron. Petra3 - like many other photon and neutron sources in Europe and World-wide - is a fantastic instrument to investigate the microscopic detail of matter and organisms. The experiments at photon science beamlines hence provide unique insights into all kind of scientific fields, ranging from medical applications to plasma physics. The success of these experiments demands enormous efforts of the scientists and quite some investments
This data server provides access to the GTC Public Archive. GTC data become public once the proprietary (1 year) is over. The Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC), is a 10.4m telescope with a segmented primary mirror.
The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle and photon reactions have been covered less extensively.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.