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Found 21 result(s)
The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) is a database of intended for researchers to share information about cloud radiative properties. The data sets focus on the effects of clouds on the climate, the radiation budget, and the long-term hydrologic cycle. Within the data sets the data entries are broken down into entries of specific characteristics based on temporal resolution, spatial resolution, or temporal coverage.
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Thousands of Temperature and salinity profiles obtained by means of Nansen hydrographic casts and available earlier only as station sheets have been digitized at the German Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH). In a cooperative effort between the KlimaCampus of the University of Hamburg and the German Oceanographic Data Centre (DOD, Hamburg) about 7500 hydrographic profiles were checked and identified as missing in the international oceanographic databases. Since most of the profiles were obtained in the decades before the second World War they represent an important extension of the international historical database and a respective contribution to the IOC Global Oceanographic Data Archeology and Rescue Project (GODAR). Since 2009 our efforts resulted in locating about 7500 hydrographic profiles that are not yet available for the oceanographic community.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
Jason is a remote-controlled deep-diving vessel that gives shipboard scientists immediate, real-time access to the sea floor. Instead of making short, expensive dives in a submarine, scientists can stay on deck and guide Jason as deep as 6,500 meters (4 miles) to explore for days on end. Jason is a type of remotely operated vehicle (ROV), a free-swimming vessel connected by a long fiberoptic tether to its research ship. The 10-km (6 mile) tether delivers power and instructions to Jason and fetches data from it.
The Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) is a NASA funded project to support and provide to the astronomical community a variety of astronomical data archives, with the primary focus on scientifically related data sets in the optical, ultraviolet, and near-infrared parts of the spectrum. MAST is located at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI).
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
The Reciprocal Net is a distributed database used by research crystallographers to store information about molecular structures; much of the data is available to the general public. The Reciprocal Net project is still under development. Currently, there are 18 participating crystallography laboratories online. The project is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and part of the National Science Digital Library. The contents of this collection will come principally from structures contributed by participating crystallography laboratories, thus providing a means for teachers, students, and the general public to connect better with current chemistry research. The Reciprocal Net's emphasis is on obtaining structures of general interest and usefulness to those several classes of digital library users.
The WHOI Ship DataGrabber system provides the oceanographic community on-line access to underway ship data collected on the R/V Atlantis, Knorr, Oceanus, and Tioga (TBD). All the shipboard data is co-registered with the ship's GPS time and navigation systems.
FlyBase is a database of genetic, genomic and functional data for Drosophila species, with a focus on the model organism Drosophila melanogaster.FlyBase contains a complete annotation of the Drosophila melanogaster genome that is updated several times per year.It also includes a searchable bibliography of research on Drosophila genetics in the last century. The site also provides a large database of images illustrating the full genome, and several movies detailing embryogenesis.
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
The Sequence Read Archive stores the raw sequencing data from such sequencing platforms as the Roche 454 GS System, the Illumina Genome Analyzer, the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System, the Helicos Heliscope, and the Complete Genomics. It archives the sequencing data associated with RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Genomic and Transcriptomic assemblies, and 16S ribosomal RNA data.
The Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) is a leading research and engineering facility operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The observatory is located at South Beach and in the ocean a mile off the south shore of Martha's Vineyard where it provides real time and archived coastal oceanographic and meteorological data for researchers, students and the general public.
The Reference Sequence (RefSeq) collection provides a comprehensive, integrated, non-redundant, well-annotated set of sequences, including genomic DNA, transcripts, and proteins. RefSeq sequences form a foundation for medical, functional, and diversity studies. They provide a stable reference for genome annotation, gene identification and characterization, mutation and polymorphism analysis (especially RefSeqGene records), expression studies, and comparative analyses.
The Protein database is a collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB. Protein sequences are the fundamental determinants of biological structure and function.
The NCBI Nucleotide database collects sequences from such sources as GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB. Sequences collected relate to genome, gene, and transcript sequence data, and provide a foundation for research related to the biomedical field.