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Found 12 result(s)
The CancerData site is an effort of the Medical Informatics and Knowledge Engineering team (MIKE for short) of Maastro Clinic, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Our activities in the field of medical image analysis and data modelling are visible in a number of projects we are running. CancerData is offering several datasets. They are grouped in collections and can be public or private. You can search for public datasets in the NBIA (National Biomedical Imaging Archive) image archives without logging in.
NASA’s Precipitation Measurement Missions – TRMM and GPM – provide advanced information on rain and snow characteristics and detailed three-dimensional knowledge of precipitation structure within the atmosphere, which help scientists study and understand Earth's water cycle, weather and climate.
The mission of NCHS is to provide statistical information that will guide actions and policies to improve the health of the American people. As the Nation's principal health statistics agency, NCHS is responsible for collecting accurate, relevant, and timely data. NCHS' mission, and those of its counterparts in the Federal statistics system, focuses on the collection, analysis, and dissemination of information that is of use to a broad range of us.
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
The BGS is a data-rich organisation with over 400 datasets in its care; including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives. Our data is managed by the National Geoscience Data Centre.
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. Building upon the success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the GPM concept centers on the deployment of a “Core” satellite carrying an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites.
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
PhysioNet is an on-line forum for the dissemination and exchange of recorded biomedical signals and open-source software for analyzing them. It provides facilities for the cooperative analysis of data and the evaluation of proposed new algorithms. In addition to providing free electronic access to PhysioBank data and PhysioToolkit software via the World Wide Web. PhysioNet offers services and training via on-line tutorials to assist users with varying levels of expertise. PhysioNet is a resource for biomedical research and development. It has three closely interdependent components: PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiologic signals, time series, and related data for use by the biomedical research community. PhysioBank currently includes more than 60 collections of cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, epilepsy, gait disorders, sleep apnea, and aging. PhysioToolkit is a large and growing library of software for physiologic signal processing and analysis, detection of physiologically significant events using both classical techniques and novel methods based on statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics, interactive display and characterization of signals, creation of new databases, simulation of physiologic and other signals, quantitative evaluation and comparison of analysis methods, and analysis of nonequilibrium and nonstationary processes. PhysioNetWorks is a virtual laboratory where you can work together with us and with colleagues anywhere in the world to create, evaluate, improve, document, and prepare new data and software "works" for publication on PhysioNet. Unlike all other parts of the PhysioNet web site, access to PhysioNetWorks is password-protected. (Accounts are free and a password can be obtained in a minute or two.)
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
The objective of this database is to stimulate the exchange of information and the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community. However, this community is not exclusive and researchers not directly involved in ChArMEx, but who wish to contribute to the achievements of ChArMEx scientific and/or educational goals are welcome to join-in. The database is a depository for all the data collected during the various projects that contribute to ChArMEx coordinated program. It aims at documenting, storing and distributing the data produced or used by the project community. However, it is also intended to host datasets that were produced outside the ChArMEx program but which are meaningful to ChArMEx scientific and/or educational goals. Any data owner who wishes to add or link his dataset to ChArMEx database is welcome to contact the database manager in order to get help and support. The ChArMEx database includes past and recent geophysical in situ observations, satellite products and model outputs. The database organizes the data management and provides data services to end-users of ChArMEx data. The database system provides a detailed description of the products and uses standardized formats whenever it is possible. It defines the access rules to the data and details the mutual rights and obligations of data providers and users (see ChArMEx data and publication policy). The database is being developed jointly by : SEDOO, OMP Toulouse , ICARE, Lille and ESPRI, IPSL Paris
The DMC is designed to provide registered users with access to non-confidential petroleum exploration and production data from offshore Nova Scotia, subject to certain conditions. The DMC is housed in the CNSOPB's Geoscience Research Centre located in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Initially, the DMC will manage and distribute the following digital petroleum data: well data (i.e. logs and reports), seismic image files (e.g. TIFF, PDF), and production data. In the future the DMC could be expanded to include operational, safety, environmental, fisheries data, etc.
TRMM is a research satellite designed to improve our understanding of the distribution and variability of precipitation within the tropics as part of the water cycle in the current climate system. By covering the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the Earth, TRMM provides much needed information on rainfall and its associated heat release that helps to power the global atmospheric circulation that shapes both weather and climate. In coordination with other satellites in NASA's Earth Observing System, TRMM provides important precipitation information using several space-borne instruments to increase our understanding of the interactions between water vapor, clouds, and precipitation, that are central to regulating Earth's climate.