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Found 213 result(s)
The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) was developed to support hurricane research. There are three components to TCIS; a global archive of multi-satellite hurricane observations 1999-2010 (Tropical Cyclone Data Archive), North Atlantic Hurricane Watch and ASA Convective Processes Experiment (CPEX) aircraft campaign. Together, data and visualizations from the real time system and data archive can be used to study hurricane process, validate and improve models, and assist in developing new algorithms and data assimilation techniques.
>>>!!!<<< as stated 2017-06-09 MPIDB is no longer available under URL http://www.jcvi.org/mpidb/about.php >>>!!!<<< The microbial protein interaction database (MPIDB) aims to collect and provide all known physical microbial interactions. Currently, 24,295 experimentally determined interactions among proteins of 250 bacterial species/strains can be browsed and downloaded. These microbial interactions have been manually curated from the literature or imported from other databases (IntAct, DIP, BIND, MINT) and are linked to 26,578 experimental evidences (PubMed ID, PSI-MI methods). In contrast to these databases, interactions in MPIDB are further supported by 68,346 additional evidences based on interaction conservation, protein complex membership, and 3D domain contacts (iPfam, 3did). We do not include (spoke/matrix) binary interactions infered from pull-down experiments.
The NCBI Short Genetic Variations database, commonly known as dbSNP, catalogs short variations in nucleotide sequences from a wide range of organisms. These variations include single nucleotide variations, short nucleotide insertions and deletions, short tandem repeats and microsatellites. Short Genetic Variations may be common, thus representing true polymorphisms, or they may be rare. Some rare human entries have additional information associated withthem, including disease associations, genotype information and allele origin, as some variations are somatic rather than germline events. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017***
The Restriction Enzyme Database is a collection of information about restriction enzymes, methylases, the microorganisms from which they have been isolated, recognition sequences, cleavage sites, methylation specificity, the commercial availability of the enzymes, and references - both published and unpublished observations (dating back to 1952). REBASE is updated daily and is constantly expanding.
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The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), a major contributor to the worldwide atmospheric research effort, consists of a set of globally distributed research stations providing consistent, standardized, long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases, particles, spectral UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface, and physical parameters, centered around the following priorities.
The CATH database is a hierarchical domain classification of protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. Protein structures are classified using a combination of automated and manual procedures. There are four major levels in the CATH hierarchy; Class, Architecture, Topology and Homologous superfamily.
PhysioNet is an on-line forum for the dissemination and exchange of recorded biomedical signals and open-source software for analyzing them. It provides facilities for the cooperative analysis of data and the evaluation of proposed new algorithms. In addition to providing free electronic access to PhysioBank data and PhysioToolkit software via the World Wide Web. PhysioNet offers services and training via on-line tutorials to assist users with varying levels of expertise. PhysioNet is a resource for biomedical research and development. It has three closely interdependent components: PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiologic signals, time series, and related data for use by the biomedical research community. PhysioBank currently includes more than 60 collections of cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, epilepsy, gait disorders, sleep apnea, and aging. PhysioToolkit is a large and growing library of software for physiologic signal processing and analysis, detection of physiologically significant events using both classical techniques and novel methods based on statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics, interactive display and characterization of signals, creation of new databases, simulation of physiologic and other signals, quantitative evaluation and comparison of analysis methods, and analysis of nonequilibrium and nonstationary processes. PhysioNetWorks is a virtual laboratory where you can work together with us and with colleagues anywhere in the world to create, evaluate, improve, document, and prepare new data and software "works" for publication on PhysioNet. Unlike all other parts of the PhysioNet web site, access to PhysioNetWorks is password-protected. (Accounts are free and a password can be obtained in a minute or two.)
UNAVCO promotes research by providing access to data that our community of geodetic scientists uses for quantifying the motions of rock, ice and water that are monitored by a variety of sensor types at or near the Earth's surface. After processing, these data enable millimeter-scale surface motion detection and monitoring at discrete points, and high-resolution strain imagery over areas of tens of square meters to hundreds of square kilometers. The data types include GPS/GNSS, imaging data such as from SAR and TLS, strain and seismic borehole data, and meteorological data. Most of these can be accessed via web services. In addition, GPS/GNSS datasets, TLS datasets, and InSAR products are assigned digital object identifiers.
The USGODAE Project consists of United States academic, government and military researchers working to improve assimilative ocean modeling as part of the International GODAE Project. GODAE hopes to develop a global system of observations, communications, modeling and assimilation, that will deliver regular, comprehensive information on the state of the oceans, in a way that will promote and engender wide utility and availability of this resource for maximum benefit to the community. The USGODAE Argo GDAC is currently operational, serving daily data from the following national DACs: Australia (CSIRO), Canada (MEDS), China (2: CSIO and NMDIS), France (Coriolis), India (INCOIS), Japan (JMA), Korea (2: KMA and Kordi), UK (BODC), and US (AOML).
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
The Barrow, Alaska Observatory (BRW) archives and provides digital access to their findings related to climate change, ozone depletion and baseline air quality. The BRW is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division.
The MPC is responsible for the designation of minor bodies in the solar system: minor planets; comets, in conjunction with the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (CBAT); and natural satellites (also in conjunction with CBAT). The MPC is also responsible for the efficient collection, computation, checking and dissemination of astrometric observations and orbits for minor planets and comets
The modENCODE Project, Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements, was initiated by the funding of applications received in response to Requests for Applications (RFAs) HG-06-006, entitled Identification of All Functional Elements in Selected Model Organism Genomes and HG-06-007, entitled A Data Coordination Center for the Model Organism ENCODE Project (modENCODE). The modENCODE Project is being run as an open consortium and welcomes any investigator willing to abide by the criteria for participation that have been established for the project. Both computational and experimental approaches are being applied by modENCODE investigators to study the genomes of D. melanogaster and C. elegans. An added benefit of studying functional elements in model organisms is the ability to biologically validate the elements discovered using methods that cannot be applied in humans. The comprehensive dataset that is expected to result from the modENCODE Project will provide important insights into the biology of D. melanogaster and C. elegans as well as other organisms, including humans.
Paleoclimatology data are derived from natural sources such as tree rings, ice cores, corals, and ocean and lake sediments. These proxy climate data extend the archive of weather and climate information hundreds to millions of years. The data include geophysical or biological measurement time series and some reconstructed climate variables such as temperature and precipitation. NCEI provides the paleoclimatology data and information scientists need to understand natural climate variability and future climate change. We also operate the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, which archives and distributes data contributed by scientists around the world.
SoyBase is a professionally curated repository for genetics, genomics and related data resources for soybean. It contains current genetic, physical and genomic sequence maps integrated with qualitative and quantitative traits. SoyBase includes annotated "Williams 82" genomic sequence and associated data mining tools. The repository maintains controlled vocabularies for soybean growth, development, and traits that are linked to more general plant ontologies.
Climate Data Online (CDO) provides free access to NCDC's archive of global historical weather and climate data in addition to station history information. These data include quality controlled daily, monthly, seasonal, and yearly measurements of temperature, precipitation, wind, and degree days as well as radar data and 30-year Climate Normals
Complete Genomics provides free public access to a variety of whole human genome data sets generated from Complete Genomics’ sequencing service. The research community can explore and familiarize themselves with the quality of these data sets, review the data formats provided from our sequencing service, and augment their own research with additional summaries of genomic variation across a panel of diverse individuals. The quality of these data sets is representative of what a customer can expect to receive for their own samples. This public genome repository comprises genome results from both our Standard Sequencing Service (69 standard, non-diseased samples) and the Cancer Sequencing Service (two matched tumor and normal sample pairs). In March 2013 Complete Genomics was acquired by BGI-Shenzhen , the world’s largest genomics services company. BGI is a company headquartered in Shenzhen, China that provides comprehensive sequencing and bioinformatics services for commercial science, medical, agricultural and environmental applications. Complete Genomics is now focused on building a new generation of high-throughput sequencing technology and developing new and exciting research, clinical and consumer applications.
Using a combination of remote sensing data and ground observations as inputs, CHG scientists have developed rainfall and other models that reliably predict crop performance in parts of the world vulnerable to crop failure. Policy makers within governments and at non-governmental organizations rely on CHG decision-support products for making critical resource allocation decisions. The CHG's scientific focus is "geospatial hydroclimatology", with an emphasis on the early detection and forecasting of hydroclimatic hazards related to food security droughts and floods. Basic research seeks an improved understanding of the climatic processes that govern drought and flood hazards in FEWS.NET countries. We develop better techniques, algorithms, and modeling applications to use remote sensing and other geospatial data for hazard early warning.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
HITRAN is an acronym for high-resolution transmission molecular absorption database. The HITRAN compilation of the SAO (HIgh resolution TRANmission molecular absorption database) is used for predicting and simulating transmission and emission of light in atmospheres. It is the world-standard database in molecular spectroscopy. The journal article describing it is the most cited reference in the geosciences. There are presently about 5000 HITRAN users world-wide. Its associated database HITEMP (high-temperature spectroscopic absorption parameters) is accessible by the HITRAN website.
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
Cryo electron microscopy enables the determination of 3D structures of macromolecular complexes and cells from 2 to 100 Å resolution. EMDataResource is the unified global portal for one-stop deposition and retrieval of 3DEM density maps, atomic models and associated metadata, and is a joint effort among investigators of the Stanford/SLAC CryoEM Facility and the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) at Rutgers, in collaboration with the EMDB team at the European Bioinformatics Institute. EMDataResource also serves as a resource for news, events, software tools, data standards, and validation methods for the 3DEM community. The major goal of the EMDataResource project in the current funding period is to work with the 3DEM community to (1) establish data-validation methods that can be used in the process of structure determination, (2) define the key indicators of a well-determined structure that should accompany every deposition, and (3) implement appropriate validation procedures for maps and map-derived models into a 3DEM validation pipeline.
The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database provides a specialist database for sequences of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and includes the official sequences named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee For Factors of the HLA System. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database is part of the international ImMunoGeneTics project (IMGT). The database uses the 2010 naming convention for HLA alleles in all tools herein. To aid in the adoption of the new nomenclature, all search tools can be used with both the current and pre-2010 allele designations. The pre-2010 nomenclature designations are only used where older reports or outputs have been made available for download.
The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which flew aboard NASA's Space Shuttle Endeavour during an 11-day mission in 2000, made the first near-global topographical map of Earth, collecting data on nearly 80 percent of Earth's land surfaces. The instrument's design was essentially a modified version of the earlier Shuttle Imaging Radar instruments with a second antenna added to allow for topographic mapping using a technique similar to stereo photography.