Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 16 result(s)
The GOES Space Environment Monitor archive is an important component of the National Space Weather Program --a interagency program to provide timely and reliable space environment observations and forecasts. GOES satellites carry onboard a Space Environment Monitor subsystem that measures X-rays, Energetic Particles and Magnetic Field at the Spacecraft.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Plant Metabolic Network (PMN) provides a broad network of plant metabolic pathway databases that contain curated information from the literature and computational analyses about the genes, enzymes, compounds, reactions, and pathways involved in primary and secondary metabolism in plants. The PMN currently houses one multi-species reference database called PlantCyc and 22 species/taxon-specific databases.
Country
CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
Pubchem contains 3 databases. 1. PubChem BioAssay: The PubChem BioAssay Database contains bioactivity screens of chemical substances described in PubChem Substance. It provides searchable descriptions of each bioassay, including descriptions of the conditions and readouts specific to that screening procedure. 2. PubChem Compound: The PubChem Compound Database contains validated chemical depiction information provided to describe substances in PubChem Substance. Structures stored within PubChem Compounds are pre-clustered and cross-referenced by identity and similarity groups. 3. PubChem Substance. The PubChem Substance Database contains descriptions of samples, from a variety of sources, and links to biological screening results that are available in PubChem BioAssay. If the chemical contents of a sample are known, the description includes links to PubChem Compound.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
DDBJ; DNA Data Bank of Japan is the sole nucleotide sequence data bank in Asia, which is officially certified to collect nucleotide sequences from researchers and to issue the internationally recognized accession number to data submitters.Since we exchange the collected data with EMBL-Bank/EBI; European Bioinformatics Institute and GenBank/NCBI; National Center for Biotechnology Information on a daily basis, the three data banks share virtually the same data at any given time. The virtually unified database is called "INSD; International Nucleotide Sequence Database DDBJ collects sequence data mainly from Japanese researchers, but of course accepts data and issue the accession number to researchers in any other countries.
GermOnline 4.0 is a cross-species database gateway focusing on high-throughput expression data relevant for germline development, the meiotic cell cycle and mitosis in healthy versus malignant cells. The portal provides access to the Saccharomyces Genomics Viewer (SGV) which facilitates online interpretation of complex data from experiments with high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays that cover the entire yeast genome.
The MEROPS database is an information resource for peptidases (also termed proteases, proteinases and proteolytic enzymes) and the proteins that inhibit them.
The objective of the Database of Genomic Variants is to provide a comprehensive summary of structural variation in the human genome. We define structural variation as genomic alterations that involve segments of DNA that are larger than >1kb. Now we also annotate InDels in 100bp-1kb range. The content of the database is only representing structural variation identified in healthy control samples. The Database of Genomic Variants provides a useful catalog of control data for studies aiming to correlate genomic variation with phenotypic data. The database is continuously updated with new data from peer reviewed research studies. We always welcome suggestions and comments regarding the database from the research community.
dbSTS is an NCBI resource that contains sequence data for short genomic landmark sequences or Sequence Tagged Sites. STS sequences are incorporated into the STS Division of GenBank.
SureChemOpen is a free resource for researchers who want to search, view and link to patent chemistry. For end-users with professional search and analysis needs, we offer the fully-featured SureChemPro. For enterprise users, SureChemDirect provides all our patent chemistry via an API or a data feed. The SureChem family of products is built upon the Claims® Global Patent Database, a comprehensive international patent collection provided by IFI Claims®. This state of the art database is normalized and curated to provide unprecedented consistency and quality.