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Found 330 result(s)
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. These are the molecules of life that are found in all organisms including bacteria, yeast, plants, flies, other animals, and humans. Understanding the shape of a molecule helps to understand how it works. This knowledge can be used to help deduce a structure's role in human health and disease, and in drug development. The structures in the archive range from tiny proteins and bits of DNA to complex molecular machines like the ribosome.
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
The WHOI Ship DataGrabber system provides the oceanographic community on-line access to underway ship data collected on the R/V Atlantis, Knorr, Oceanus, and Tioga (TBD). All the shipboard data is co-registered with the ship's GPS time and navigation systems.
The primary focus of the Upper Ocean Processes Group is the study of physical processes in the upper ocean and at the air-sea interface using moored surface buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors. UOP Project Map The Upper Ocean Processes Group provides technical support to upper ocean and air-sea interface science programs. Deep-ocean and shallow-water moored surface buoy arrays are designed, fabricated, instrumented, tested, and deployed at sea for periods of up to one year
Greengenes is an Earth Sciences website that assists clinical and environmental microbiologists from around the globe in classifying microorganisms from their local environments. A 16S rRNA gene database addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies.
This centre receives and archives precipitation chemistry data and complementary information from stations around the world. Data archived by this centre are accessible via connections with the WDCPC database. Freely available data from regional and national programmes with their own Web sites are accessible via links to these sites. The WDCPC is one of six World Data Centres in the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW). The focus on precipitation chemistry is described in the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme. Guidance on all aspects of collecting precipitation for chemical analysis is provided in the Manual for the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme (WMO-GAW Report No. 160).
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
TOXNET (TOXicology Data NETwork) is a group of databases covering chemicals and drugs, diseases and the environment, environmental health, occupational safety and health, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and toxicology. Information in the TOXNET databases covers: Toxicology data: CCRIS (Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System), CPDB (Carcinogenic Potency Database), CTD (Comparative Toxicogenomics Database), GENE-TOX (Genetic Toxicology), HSDB® (Hazardous Substances Data Bank), Haz-Map®, Household Products Database, IRIS (Integrated Risk Information System), ITER (International Toxicity Estimates for Risk), LactMed® (Drugs and Lactation), TRI (Toxics Release Inventory), TOXMAP®, ; Chemical nomenclature: ChemIDplus; Toxicology literature: TOXLINE®, DART® (Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database).
The PRISM Climate Group gathers climate observations from a wide range of monitoring networks, applies sophisticated quality control measures, and develops spatial climate datasets to reveal short- and long-term climate patterns. The resulting datasets incorporate a variety of modeling techniques and are available at multiple spatial/temporal resolutions, covering the period from 1895 to the present. Whenever possible, we offer these datasets to the public, either free of charge or for a fee (depending on dataset size/complexity and funding available for the activity).
CDAAC is responsible for processing the science data received from COSMIC. This data is currently being processed not long after the data is received, i.e. approximately eighty percent of radio occultation profiles are delivered to operational weather centers within 3 hours of observation as well as in a more accurate post-processed mode (within 8 weeks of observation).
The Precipitation Processing System (PPS) evolved from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Science Data and Information System (TSDIS). The purpose of the PPS is to process, analyze and archive data from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, partner satellites and the TRMM mission. The PPS also supports TRMM by providing validation products from TRMM ground radar sites. All GPM, TRMM and Partner public data products are available to the science community and the general public from the TRMM/GPM FTP Data Archive. Please note that you need to register to be able to access this data. Registered users can also search for GPM, partner and TRMM data, order custom subsets and set up subscriptions using our PPS Data Products Ordering Interface (STORM)
The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database supports the use of the mouse as a model system of hereditary cancer by providing electronic access to: Information on endogenous spontaneous and induced tumors in mice, including tumor frequency & latency data, Information on genetically defined mice (inbred, hybrid, mutant, and genetically engineered strains of mice) in which tumors arise, Information on genetic factors associated with tumor susceptibility in mice and somatic genetic-mutations observed in the tumors, Tumor pathology reports and images, References, supporting MTB data and Links to other online resources for cancer.
MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (originally known as EOS AM-1) and Aqua (originally known as EOS PM-1) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth is timed so that it passes from north to south across the equator in the morning, while Aqua passes south to north over the equator in the afternoon. Terra MODIS and Aqua MODIS are viewing the entire Earth's surface every 1 to 2 days, acquiring data in 36 spectral bands, or groups of wavelengths (see MODIS Technical Specifications). These data will improve our understanding of global dynamics and processes occurring on the land, in the oceans, and in the lower atmosphere. MODIS is playing a vital role in the development of validated, global, interactive Earth system models able to predict global change accurately enough to assist policy makers in making sound decisions concerning the protection of our environment.
Strong-motion data of engineering and scientific importance from the United States and other seismically active countries are served through the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data(CESMD). The CESMD now automatically posts strong-motion data from an increasing number of seismic stations in California within a few minutes following an earthquake as an InternetQuick Report(IQR). As appropriate,IQRs are updated by more comprehensive Internet Data Reports that include reviewed versions of the data and maps showing, for example, the finite fault rupture along with the distribution of recording stations. Automated processing of strong-motion data will be extended to post the strong-motion records of the regional seismic networks of the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) outside California.
GENCODE is a scientific project in genome research and part of the ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) scale-up project. The GENCODE consortium was initially formed as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE project to identify and map all protein-coding genes within the ENCODE regions (approx. 1% of Human genome). Given the initial success of the project, GENCODE now aims to build an “Encyclopedia of genes and genes variants” by identifying all gene features in the human and mouse genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation, and annotating all evidence-based gene features in the entire human genome at a high accuracy.
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At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at https://portal.aodn.org.au/. - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.
To understand the global surface energy budget is to understand climate. Because it is impractical to cover the earth with monitoring stations, the answer to global coverage lies in reliable satellite-based estimates. Efforts are underway at NASA and universities to develop algorithms to do this, but such projects are in their infancy. In concert with these ambitious efforts, accurate and precise ground-based measurements in differing climatic regions are essential to refine and verify the satellite-based estimates, as well as to support specialized research. To fill this niche, the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) was established in 1993 through the support of NOAA's Office of Global Programs.
As one of the cornerstones of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Geospatial Program, The National Map is a collaborative effort among the USGS and other Federal, State, and local partners to improve and deliver topographic information for the Nation. It has many uses ranging from recreation to scientific analysis to emergency response. The National Map is easily accessible for display on the Web, as products and services, and as downloadable data. The geographic information available from The National Map includes orthoimagery (aerial photographs), elevation, geographic names, hydrography, boundaries, transportation, structures, and land cover. Other types of geographic information can be added within the viewer or brought in with The National Map data into a Geographic Information System to create specific types of maps or map views.
U.S. IOOS is a vital tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes environment. A primary focus of U.S. IOOS is integration of, and expedited access to, ocean observation data for improved decision making. The Data Management and Communication (DMAC) subsystem of U.S. IOOS serves as a central mechanism for integrating all existing and projected data sources.
The Cellular Phenotype database stores data derived from high-throughput phenotypic studies and it is being developed as part of the Systems Microscopy Network of Excellence project. The aim of the Cellular Phenotype database is to provide easy access to phenotypic data and facilitate the integration of independent phenotypic studies. Through its interface, users can search for a gene of interest, or a collection of genes, and retrieve the loss-of-function phenotypes observed, in human cells, by suppressing the expression of the selected gene(s), through RNA interference (RNAi), across independent phenotypic studies. Similarly, users can search for a phenotype of interest and retrieve the RNAi reagents that have caused such phenotype and the associated target genes. Information about specific RNAi reagents can also be obtained when searching for a reagent ID.
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. Building upon the success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the GPM concept centers on the deployment of a “Core” satellite carrying an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites.
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Dog Genome SNP Database (DoGSD) is a data container for the variation information of dog/wolf genomes. It was designed and constructed as an SNPs detector and visualization tool to provide the research community a useful resource for the study of dog's population, evolution, phenotype and life habit.
The UCI Machine Learning Repository is a collection of databases, domain theories, and data generators that are used by the machine learning community for the empirical analysis of machine learning algorithms. It is used by students, educators, and researchers all over the world as a primary source of machine learning data sets. As an indication of the impact of the archive, it has been cited over 1000 times.
NCEP delivers national and global weather, water, climate and space weather guidance, forecasts, warnings and analyses to its Partners and External User Communities. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), an arm of the NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), is comprised of nine distinct Centers, and the Office of the Director, which provide a wide variety of national and international weather guidance products to National Weather Service field offices, government agencies, emergency managers, private sector meteorologists, and meteorological organizations and societies throughout the world. NCEP is a critical national resource in national and global weather prediction. NCEP is the starting point for nearly all weather forecasts in the United States. The Centers are: Aviation Weather Center (AWC), Climate Prediction Center (CPC), Environmental Modeling Center (EMC), NCEP Central Operations (NCO), National Hurricane Center (NHC), Ocean Prediction Center (OPC), Storm Prediction Center (SPC), Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), Weather Prediction Center (WPC)