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Found 30 result(s)
The CiardRING is a global directory of web-based information services and datasets for agricultural research for development (ARD). It is the principal tool created through the CIARD initiative to allow information providers to register their services and datasets in various categories and so facilitate the discovery of sources of agriculture-related information across the world. The RING aims to provide an infrastructure to improve the accessibility of the outputs of agricultural research and of information relevant to agriculture.
The World Ocean Database (WOD) is a collection of scientifically quality-controlled ocean profile and plankton data that includes measurements of temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorophyll, alkalinity, pH, pCO2, TCO2, Tritium, Δ13Carbon, Δ14Carbon, Δ18Oxygen, Freon, Helium, Δ3Helium, Neon, and plankton. WOD contains all data of "World Data Service Oceanography" (WDS-Oceanography).
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
!!!! <<<< The Community Data Portal (CDP) has been retired after nearly 15 years of service and is no longer available. Data can now be found here: DASH Search: https://data.ucar.edu/ . Please contact us with questions or concerns: datahelp@ucar.edu >>>> !!!! The Community Data Portal (CDP) is a collection of earth science datasets from NCAR, UCAR, UOP, and participating organizations.
The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) provides both historical and current Earth science data, information, and products from satellite, airborne, and surface-based instruments. GHRC acquires basic data streams and produces derived products from many instruments spread across a variety of instrument platforms.
The European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) is a scientifically based and policy driven programme under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) for international co-operation to solve transboundary air pollution problems.
The Precipitation Processing System (PPS) evolved from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Science Data and Information System (TSDIS). The purpose of the PPS is to process, analyze and archive data from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, partner satellites and the TRMM mission. The PPS also supports TRMM by providing validation products from TRMM ground radar sites. All GPM, TRMM and Partner public data products are available to the science community and the general public from the TRMM/GPM FTP Data Archive. Please note that you need to register to be able to access this data. Registered users can also search for GPM, partner and TRMM data, order custom subsets and set up subscriptions using our PPS Data Products Ordering Interface (STORM)
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AVISO stands for "Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data". Here, you will find data, articles, news and tools to help you discover or improve your skills in the altimetry domain through four key themes: ocean, coast, hydrology and ice. Altimetry is a technique for measuring height. Satellite altimetry measures the time taken by a radar pulse to travel from the satellite antenna to the surface and back to the satellite receiver. Combined with precise satellite location data, altimetry measurements yield sea-surface heights.
NCEP delivers national and global weather, water, climate and space weather guidance, forecasts, warnings and analyses to its Partners and External User Communities. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), an arm of the NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), is comprised of nine distinct Centers, and the Office of the Director, which provide a wide variety of national and international weather guidance products to National Weather Service field offices, government agencies, emergency managers, private sector meteorologists, and meteorological organizations and societies throughout the world. NCEP is a critical national resource in national and global weather prediction. NCEP is the starting point for nearly all weather forecasts in the United States. The Centers are: Aviation Weather Center (AWC), Climate Prediction Center (CPC), Environmental Modeling Center (EMC), NCEP Central Operations (NCO), National Hurricane Center (NHC), Ocean Prediction Center (OPC), Storm Prediction Center (SPC), Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), Weather Prediction Center (WPC)
CDAAC is responsible for processing the science data received from COSMIC. This data is currently being processed not long after the data is received, i.e. approximately eighty percent of radio occultation profiles are delivered to operational weather centers within 3 hours of observation as well as in a more accurate post-processed mode (within 8 weeks of observation).
The Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) serves the environmental science community through managing data centres, data analysis environments, and participation in a host of relevant research projects. We aim to support environmental science, further environmental data archival practices, and develop and deploy new technologies to enhance access to data. Additionally we provide services to aid large scale data analysis. The CEDA Archive operates the atmospheric and earth observation data centre functions on behalf of NERC for the UK atmospheric science and earth observation communities. It covers climate, composition, observations and NWP data as well as various earth observation datasets, including airborne and satellite data and imagery. Prior to November 2016 these functions were operted by CEDA under the titles of the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC) and the NERC Earth Observation Data Centre (NEODC). CEDA also operates the UK Solar System Data Centre (UKSSDC), which curates and provides access to archives of data from the upper atmosphere, ionosphere and Earth's solar environment.
The KNMI Data Centre (KDC) provides access to weather, climate and seismological datasets of KNMI. For each dataset descriptive information is available (metadata), including a point of contact. The KNMI Data Centre (KDC) provides access to KNMI data on weather, climate and seismology. You will find KNMI data on various topics such as: the most recent 10 minutes of observations, historical data, data on meteorological stations, modeling, earthquake data and satellite products.
The USGODAE Project consists of United States academic, government and military researchers working to improve assimilative ocean modeling as part of the International GODAE Project. GODAE hopes to develop a global system of observations, communications, modeling and assimilation, that will deliver regular, comprehensive information on the state of the oceans, in a way that will promote and engender wide utility and availability of this resource for maximum benefit to the community. The USGODAE Argo GDAC is currently operational, serving daily data from the following national DACs: Australia (CSIRO), Canada (MEDS), China (2: CSIO and NMDIS), France (Coriolis), India (INCOIS), Japan (JMA), Korea (2: KMA and Kordi), UK (BODC), and US (AOML).
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
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The CliSAP-Integrated Climate Data Center (ICDC) allows easy access to climate relevant data from in-situ measurements and satellite remote sensing. These data are important to determine the status and the changes in the climate system. Additionally some relevant re-analysis data are included, which are modeled on the basis of observational data.
EartH2Observe brings together the findings from European FP projects DEWFORA, GLOWASIS, WATCH, GEOWOW and others. It will integrate available global earth observations (EO), in-situ datasets and models and will construct a global water resources re-analysis dataset of significant length (several decades). The resulting data will allow for improved insights on the full extent of available water and existing pressures on global water resources in all parts of the water cycle. The project will support efficient and globally consistent water management and decision making by providing comprehensive multi-scale (regional, continental and global) water resources observations. It will test new EO data sources, extend existing processing algorithms and combine data from multiple satellite missions in order to improve the overall resolution and reliability of EO data included in the re-analysis dataset. The resulting datasets will be made available through an open Water Cycle Integrator data portal https://wci.earth2observe.eu/ : the European contribution to the GEOSS/WCI approach. The datasets will be downscaled for application in case-studies at regional and local levels, and optimized based on identified European and local needs supporting water management and decision making . Actual data access: https://wci.earth2observe.eu/data/group/earth2observe
The Natural Environment Research Council's Data Repository for Atmospheric Science and Earth Observation. The Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) serves the environmental science community through three data centres, data analysis environments, and participation in a host of relevant research projects. We aim to support environmental science, further environmental data archival practices, and develop and deploy new technologies to enhance access to data. Additionally we provide services to aid large scale data analysis.
The NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Project is a joint project between the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP, formerly "NMC") and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The goal of this joint effort is to produce new atmospheric analyses using historical data (1948 onwards) and as well to produce analyses of the current atmospheric state (Climate Data Assimilation System, CDAS).
OceanSITES is a worldwide system of long-term, deepwater reference stations measuring dozens of variables and monitoring the full depth of the ocean from air-sea interactions down to 5,000 meters. Since 1999, the international OceanSITES science team has shared both data and costs in order to capitalize on the enormous potential of these moorings. The growing network now consists of about 30 surface and 30 subsurface arrays. Satellite telemetry enables near real-time access to OceanSITES data by scientists and the public. OceanSITES moorings are an integral part of the Global Ocean Observing System. They complement satellite imagery and ARGO float data by adding the dimensions of time and depth.
The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves and beaches along the coastlines of the United States. Since its inception in 1975, the program has produced a vast database of publicly-accessible environmental data for use by coastal engineers and planners, scientists, mariners, and marine enthusiasts. The program has also remained at the forefront of coastal monitoring, developing numerous innovations in instrumentation, system control and management, computer hardware and software, field equipment, and installation techniques.
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HYdrological cycle in the Mediterranean EXperiemnt. Considering the science and societal issues motivating HyMeX, the programme aims to : improve our understanding of the water cycle, with emphasis on extreme events, by monitoring and modelling the Mediterranean atmosphere-land-ocean coupled system, its variability from the event to the seasonal and interannual scales, and its characteristics over one decade (2010-2020) in the context of global change, assess the social and economic vulnerability to extreme events and adaptation capacity.The multidisciplinary research and the database developed within HyMeX should contribute to: improve observational and modelling systems, especially for coupled systems, better predict extreme events, simulate the long-term water-cycle more accurately, provide guidelines for adaptation measures, especially in the context of global change.
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The Coriolis Data Centre handles operational oceanography measurements made in situ, complementing the measurement of the ocean surface made using instruments aboard satellites. This work is realised through the establishment of permanent networks with data collected by ships or autonomous systems that are either fixed or drifting. This data can be used to construct a snapshot of water mass structure and current intensity.
The objective of this database is to stimulate the exchange of information and the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community. However, this community is not exclusive and researchers not directly involved in ChArMEx, but who wish to contribute to the achievements of ChArMEx scientific and/or educational goals are welcome to join-in. The database is a depository for all the data collected during the various projects that contribute to ChArMEx coordinated program. It aims at documenting, storing and distributing the data produced or used by the project community. However, it is also intended to host datasets that were produced outside the ChArMEx program but which are meaningful to ChArMEx scientific and/or educational goals. Any data owner who wishes to add or link his dataset to ChArMEx database is welcome to contact the database manager in order to get help and support. The ChArMEx database includes past and recent geophysical in situ observations, satellite products and model outputs. The database organizes the data management and provides data services to end-users of ChArMEx data. The database system provides a detailed description of the products and uses standardized formats whenever it is possible. It defines the access rules to the data and details the mutual rights and obligations of data providers and users (see ChArMEx data and publication policy). The database is being developed jointly by : SEDOO, OMP Toulouse , ICARE, Lille and ESPRI, IPSL Paris
MERMex is focused on the biogeochemical changes that will take place in the Mediterranean Sea due to natural changes as well as the socio-economic impacts, and how they will affect marine ecosystems and biodiversity.