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Found 80 result(s)
The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is designed to provide detailed infrared properties of selected Galactic and extragalactic sources. The sensitivity of the telescopic system is about one thousand times superior to that of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), since the ISO telescope enables integration of infrared flux from a source for several hours. Density waves in the interstellar medium, its role in star formation, the giant planets, asteroids, and comets of the solar system are among the objects of investigation. ISO was operated as an observatory with the majority of its observing time being distributed to the general astronomical community. One of the consequences of this is that the data set is not homogeneous, as would be expected from a survey. The observational data underwent sophisticated data processing, including validation and accuracy analysis. In total, the ISO Data Archive contains about 30,000 standard observations, 120,000 parallel, serendipity and calibration observations and 17,000 engineering measurements. In addition to the observational data products, the archive also contains satellite data, documentation, data of historic aspects and externally derived products, for a total of more than 400 GBytes stored on magnetic disks. The ISO Data Archive is constantly being improved both in contents and functionality throughout the Active Archive Phase, ending in December 2006.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
The Plant Metabolic Network (PMN) provides a broad network of plant metabolic pathway databases that contain curated information from the literature and computational analyses about the genes, enzymes, compounds, reactions, and pathways involved in primary and secondary metabolism in plants. The PMN currently houses one multi-species reference database called PlantCyc and 22 species/taxon-specific databases.
The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) provides both historical and current Earth science data, information, and products from satellite, airborne, and surface-based instruments. GHRC acquires basic data streams and produces derived products from many instruments spread across a variety of instrument platforms.
Jason is a remote-controlled deep-diving vessel that gives shipboard scientists immediate, real-time access to the sea floor. Instead of making short, expensive dives in a submarine, scientists can stay on deck and guide Jason as deep as 6,500 meters (4 miles) to explore for days on end. Jason is a type of remotely operated vehicle (ROV), a free-swimming vessel connected by a long fiberoptic tether to its research ship. The 10-km (6 mile) tether delivers power and instructions to Jason and fetches data from it.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network provides data on ozone depletion and the associated effects on terrestrial and marine systems. Data are collected from 7 sites in Antarctica, Argentina, United States, and Greenland. The network is providing data to researchers studying the effects of ozone depletion on terrestrial and marine biological systems. Network data is also used for the validation of satellite observations and for the verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere.
NARSTO is dedicated to improving management of air quality in North America. Additionally, NARSTO is working to improve collaboration between the air-quality and health-sciences research communities, to advance understanding of the scientific issues involved in effecting a multi-pollutant/multi-media approach to air quality management, and to increase understanding of the linkages between air quality and climate change. NARSTO is represented by private and public organizations in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. NARSTO was terminated as of December 31, 2010. While data remain available via the original NARSTO Data Archive, the permanent data archive is maintained by the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center at https://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/project/narsto/narsto_table
The Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is a national user facility with massive-scale DNA sequencing and analysis capabilities dedicated to advancing genomics for bioenergy and environmental applications. Beyond generating tens of trillions of DNA bases annually, the Institute develops and maintains data management systems and specialized analytical capabilities to manage and interpret complex genomic data sets, and to enable an expanding community of users around the world to analyze these data in different contexts over the web. The JGI Genome Portal provides a unified access point to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. A user can find all DOE JGI sequencing projects and their status, search for and download assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes, and interactively explore those genomes and compare them with other sequenced microbes, fungi, plants or metagenomes using specialized systems tailored to each particular class of organisms. Databases: Genome Online Database (GOLD), Integrated Microbial Genomes (IGM), MycoCosm, Phytozome
The CancerData site is an effort of the Medical Informatics and Knowledge Engineering team (MIKE for short) of Maastro Clinic, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Our activities in the field of medical image analysis and data modelling are visible in a number of projects we are running. CancerData is offering several datasets. They are grouped in collections and can be public or private. You can search for public datasets in the NBIA (National Biomedical Imaging Archive) image archives without logging in.
The European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) is a scientifically based and policy driven programme under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) for international co-operation to solve transboundary air pollution problems.
The Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) develops, produces, archives and disseminates satellite-data-based products in support to climate monitoring. The product suite mainly covers parameters related to the energy & water cycle and addresses many of the Essential Climate Variables as defined by GCOS (GCOS 138). The CM SAF produces both Enviromental Data Records and Climate Data Records.
NASA’s Precipitation Measurement Missions – TRMM and GPM – provide advanced information on rain and snow characteristics and detailed three-dimensional knowledge of precipitation structure within the atmosphere, which help scientists study and understand Earth's water cycle, weather and climate.
GESDB is a platform for sharing simulation data and discussion of simulation techniques for human genetic studies. The database contains simulation scripts, simulated data, and documentations from published manuscripts. The forum provides a platform for Q&A for the simulated data and exchanging simulation ideas. GESDB aims to promote transparency and efficiency in simulation studies for human genetic studies.
This site provides information about the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development (Pediatric MRI Study) and resulting Pediatric MRI Data Repository. This website serves as the portal through which data can be obtained by qualified researchers. The overarching goal of the Pediatric MRI Study is to foster a better understanding of normal brain maturation as a basis for understanding atypical brain development associated with a variety of disorders and diseases.
The Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD) is a collection of atomic and molecular transition parameters of astronomical interest. VALD offers tools for selecting subsets of lines for typical astrophysical applications: line identification, preparing for spectroscopic observations, chemical composition and radial velocity measurements, model atmosphere calculations etc.
As part of the Copernicus Space Component programme, ESA manages the coordinated access to the data procured from the various Contributing Missions and the Sentinels, in response to the Copernicus users requirements. The Data Access Portfolio documents the data offer and the access rights per user category. The CSCDA portal is the access point to all data, including Sentinel missions, for Copernicus Core Users as defined in the EU Copernicus Programme Regulation (e.g. Copernicus Services).The Copernicus Space Component (CSC) Data Access system is the interface for accessing the Earth Observation products from the Copernicus Space Component. The system overall space capacity relies on several EO missions contributing to Copernicus, and it is continuously evolving, with new missions becoming available along time and others ending and/or being replaced.
The twin GRACE satellites were launched on March 17, 2002. Since that time, the GRACE Science Data System (SDS) has produced and distributed estimates of the Earth gravity field on an ongoing basis. These estimates, in conjunction with other data and models, have provided observations of terrestrial water storage changes, ice-mass variations, ocean bottom pressure changes and sea-level variations. This portal, together with PODAAC, is responsible for the distribution of the data and documentation for the GRACE project.
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
The WHOI Ship DataGrabber system provides the oceanographic community on-line access to underway ship data collected on the R/V Atlantis, Knorr, Oceanus, and Tioga (TBD). All the shipboard data is co-registered with the ship's GPS time and navigation systems.
This centre receives and archives precipitation chemistry data and complementary information from stations around the world. Data archived by this centre are accessible via connections with the WDCPC database. Freely available data from regional and national programmes with their own Web sites are accessible via links to these sites. The WDCPC is one of six World Data Centres in the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW). The focus on precipitation chemistry is described in the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme. Guidance on all aspects of collecting precipitation for chemical analysis is provided in the Manual for the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme (WMO-GAW Report No. 160).
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
The Precipitation Processing System (PPS) evolved from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Science Data and Information System (TSDIS). The purpose of the PPS is to process, analyze and archive data from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, partner satellites and the TRMM mission. The PPS also supports TRMM by providing validation products from TRMM ground radar sites. All GPM, TRMM and Partner public data products are available to the science community and the general public from the TRMM/GPM FTP Data Archive. Please note that you need to register to be able to access this data. Registered users can also search for GPM, partner and TRMM data, order custom subsets and set up subscriptions using our PPS Data Products Ordering Interface (STORM)
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At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at https://portal.aodn.org.au/. - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.