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Found 47 result(s)
Peptidome was a public repository that archived tandem mass spectrometry peptide and protein identification data generated by the scientific community. This repository is now offline and is in archival mode. All data may be obtained from the Peptidome FTP site. Due to budgetary constraints NCBI has discontinued the Peptidome Repository. All existing data and metadata files will continue to be made available from our ftp server a ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/peptidome/ indefinitely. Those files are named according to their Peptidome accession number, allowing cited data to be identified and downloaded. All of the Peptidome studies have been made publicly available at the PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) database. A map of Peptidome to Pride accessions may be found at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/peptidome/peptidome-pride_map.txt. If you have any specific questions, please feel free to contact us at info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
A collection of data at Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) supporting research that helps people make more informed decisions and improves the quality of health care services. The portal contains U.S.Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) and other sources concerning cost, quality, accesibility and evaluation of healthcare and medical insurance.
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We are a leading international centre for genomics and bioinformatics research. Our mandate is to advance knowledge about cancer and other diseases, to improve human health through disease prevention, diagnosis and therapeutic approaches, and to realize the social and economic benefits of genomics research.
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SIDER contains information on marketed medicines and their recorded adverse drug reactions. The information is extracted from public documents and package inserts. The available information include side effect frequency, drug and side effect classifications as well as links to further information, for example drug–target relations.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
This site provides information about the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development (Pediatric MRI Study) and resulting Pediatric MRI Data Repository. This website serves as the portal through which data can be obtained by qualified researchers. The overarching goal of the Pediatric MRI Study is to foster a better understanding of normal brain maturation as a basis for understanding atypical brain development associated with a variety of disorders and diseases.
This resource allows users to search for and compare influenza virus genomes and gene sequences taken from GenBank. It also provides a virus sequence annotation tool and links to other influenza resources: NIAID project, JCVI Flu, Influenza research database, CDC Flu, Vaccine Selection and WHO Flu.
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China National GeneBank DataBase (CNGBdb) is a unified platform built for biological big data sharing and application services to the research community. Based on the big data and cloud computing technologies, it provides data services such as archive, analysis, knowledge search, management authorization, and visualization. At present, CNGBdb has integrated large amounts of internal and external molecular data and other information from CNGB, NCBI, EBI, DDBJ, etc., indexed by search, covering 12 data structures. Moreover, CNGBdb correlates living sources, biological samples and bioinformatic data to realize the traceability of comprehensive data.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
The ENCODE Encyclopedia organizes the most salient analysis products into annotations, and provides tools to search and visualize them. The Encyclopedia has two levels of annotations: Integrative-level annotations integrate multiple types of experimental data and ground level annotations. Ground-level annotations are derived directly from the experimental data, typically produced by uniform processing pipelines.
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information
GENCODE is a scientific project in genome research and part of the ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) scale-up project. The GENCODE consortium was initially formed as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE project to identify and map all protein-coding genes within the ENCODE regions (approx. 1% of Human genome). Given the initial success of the project, GENCODE now aims to build an “Encyclopedia of genes and genes variants” by identifying all gene features in the human and mouse genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation, and annotating all evidence-based gene features in the entire human genome at a high accuracy.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. These are the molecules of life that are found in all organisms including bacteria, yeast, plants, flies, other animals, and humans. Understanding the shape of a molecule helps to understand how it works. This knowledge can be used to help deduce a structure's role in human health and disease, and in drug development. The structures in the archive range from tiny proteins and bits of DNA to complex molecular machines like the ribosome.
The PeptideAtlas validates expressed proteins to provide eukaryotic genome data. Peptide Atlas provides data to advance biological discoveries in humans. The PeptideAtlas accepts proteomic data from high-throughput processes and encourages data submission.
Greengenes is an Earth Sciences website that assists clinical and environmental microbiologists from around the globe in classifying microorganisms from their local environments. A 16S rRNA gene database addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies.
ArrayExpress is one of the major international repositories for high-throughput functional genomics data from both microarray and high-throughput sequencing studies, many of which are supported by peer-reviewed publications. Data sets are either submitted directly to ArrayExpress and curated by a team of specialist biological curators, or are imported systematically from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database on a weekly basis. Data is collected to MIAME and MINSEQE standards.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
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The Japanese Genotype-phenotype Archive (JGA) is a service for permanent archiving and sharing of all types of individual-level genetic and de-identified phenotypic data resulting from biomedical research projects. The JGA contains exclusive data collected from individuals whose consent agreements authorize data release only for specific research use or to bona fide researchers. Strict protocols govern how information is managed, stored and distributed by the JGA. Once processed, all data are encrypted. Users can contact the JGA team from here. JGA services are provided in collaboration with National Bioscience Database Center (NBDC) of Japan Science and Technology Agency.
Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
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The Taenia solium genome project is a whole genome sequencing project of the parasite Taenia solium, the causal agent of human and porcine cysticercosis; a disease that is still a public health problem of relevance in Mexico. It is being carried out by a consortium of scientists belonging to diverse institutions of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, the National Autonomous University of Mexico).