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Found 23 result(s)
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
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Species included in PlantTFDB 4.0 covers the main lineages of green plants. Therefore, PlantTFDB provides genomic TF repertoires across Viridiplantae. To provide comprehensive information for the TF family, a brief introduction and key references are presented for each family. Comprehensive annotations are made for each identified TF, including functional domains, 3D structures, gene ontology (GO), plant ontology (PO), expression information, expert-curated functional description, regulation information, interaction, conserved elements, references, and annotations in various databases such as UniProt, RefSeq, TransFac, STRING, and VISTA. By inferring orthologous groups and constructing phylogenetic trees, evolutionary relationships among identified TFs were inferred. In addition, PlantTFDB has a simple and user-friendly interface to allow users to query based on combined conditions or make sequence similarity search using BLAST.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
The Database of Genomic Variants archive provides curated archiving and distribution of publicly available genomic structural variants. Direct submissions are accepted as well as published data. The DGVa is the primary supplier of data to the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV) (hosted by The Centre for Applied Genomics in Toronto, Canada).
The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database supports the use of the mouse as a model system of hereditary cancer by providing electronic access to: Information on endogenous spontaneous and induced tumors in mice, including tumor frequency & latency data, Information on genetically defined mice (inbred, hybrid, mutant, and genetically engineered strains of mice) in which tumors arise, Information on genetic factors associated with tumor susceptibility in mice and somatic genetic-mutations observed in the tumors, Tumor pathology reports and images, References, supporting MTB data and Links to other online resources for cancer.
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
The UCSD Signaling Gateway Molecule Pages provide essential information on over thousands of proteins involved in cellular signaling. Each Molecule Page contains regularly updated information derived from public data sources as well as sequence analysis, references and links to other databases.
The CATH database is a hierarchical domain classification of protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. Protein structures are classified using a combination of automated and manual procedures. There are four major levels in the CATH hierarchy; Class, Architecture, Topology and Homologous superfamily.
The ProteomeXchange consortium has been set up to provide a single point of submission of MS proteomics data to the main existing proteomics repositories, and to encourage the data exchange between them for optimal data dissemination. Current members accepting submissions are: The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database at the European Bioinformatics Institute focusing mainly on shotgun mass spectrometry proteomics data PeptideAtlas/PASSEL focusing on SRM/MRM datasets.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
GenBankĀ® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide. The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR) has been established at EMBL-EBI to continue supporting data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, supplemented with new data and new analysis.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
The UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef) provide clustered sets of sequences from the UniProt Knowledgebase (including isoforms) and selected UniParc records in order to obtain complete coverage of the sequence space at several resolutions while hiding redundant sequences (but not their descriptions) from view.