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Found 8 result(s)
The HEASARC is a multi-mission astronomy archive for the EUV, X-ray, and Gamma ray wave bands. Because EUV, X and Gamma rays cannot reach the Earth's surface it is necessary to place the telescopes and sensors on spacecraft. The HEASARC now holds the data from 25 observatories covering over 30 years of X-ray, extreme-ultraviolet and gamma-ray astronomy. Data and software from many of the older missions were restored by the HEASARC staff. Examples of these archived missions include ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, Compton GRO, HEAO 1, Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2), EUVE, EXOSAT, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, ROSAT, Rossi XTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton.
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AVISO stands for "Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data". Here, you will find data, articles, news and tools to help you discover or improve your skills in the altimetry domain through four key themes: ocean, coast, hydrology and ice. Altimetry is a technique for measuring height. Satellite altimetry measures the time taken by a radar pulse to travel from the satellite antenna to the surface and back to the satellite receiver. Combined with precise satellite location data, altimetry measurements yield sea-surface heights.
On June 1, 1990 the German X-ray observatory ROSAT started its mission to open a new era in X-ray astronomy. Doubtless, this is the most ambitious project realized up to now in the short history of this young astronomical discipline. Equipped with the largest imaging X-ray telescope ever inserted into an earth orbit ROSAT has provided a tremendous amount of new scientific data and insights.
Hourly "Near-Earth" solar wind magnetic field and plasma data, energetic proton fluxes (>1 to >60 MeV), and geomagnetic and solar activity indices. OMNIWeb is part of "Space Physics Data Facility" (https://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100010168 ).
This facility permits selective searches of some atomic data files compiled by R. L. Kurucz (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics). The data provided are: - vacuum wavelength (in nm) [above 200 nm calculated using Edlen, Metrologia, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1966]- air wavelength (in nm) above 200 nm- log(gf), - E [in cm-1], j, parity, and configuration for the levels (lower, upper), - information regarding the source of the data. CD-ROM 18 contains the spectrum synthesis programs ATLAS7V, SYNTHE, SPECTRV, ROTATE, BROADEN, PLOTSYN, etc. and sample runs found in directory PROGRAMS; Atomic line data files BELLHEAVY.DAT, BELLLIGHT.DAT, GFIRONLAB.DAT, GULLIVER.DAT, NLTELINES.DAT, GFIRONQ.DAT, obsolete, merged into GFALL, found in directory LINELISTS: Molecular line data files C2AX.ASC, C2BA.ASC, C2DA.ASC, C2EA.ASC, CNAX.ASC, CNBX.ASC, COAX.ASC, COXX.ASC, H2.ASC, HYDRIDES.ASC, SIOAX.ASC, SIOEX.ASC, SIOXX.ASC, found in directory LINELISTS; and my solar flux atlas for test calculations SOLARFLUX.ASC.
The NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive serves as the permanent archive for NASA space science mission data. "Space science" means astronomy and astrophysics, solar and space plasma physics, and planetary and lunar science. As permanent archive, NSSDCA teams with NASA's discipline-specific space science "active archives" which provide access to data to researchers and, in some cases, to the general public. NSSDCA also serves as NASA's permanent archive for space physics mission data. It provides access to several geophysical models and to data from some non-NASA mission data. In addition to supporting active space physics and astrophysics researchers, NSSDCA also supports the general public both via several public-interest web-based services (e.g., the Photo Gallery) and via the offline mailing of CD-ROMs, photoprints, and other items.
The WDC Geomagnetism, Edinburgh has a comprehensive set of digital geomagnetic data as well as indices of geomagnetic activity supplied from a worldwide network of magnetic observatories. The data and services at the WDC are available for scientific use without restrictions.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.