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Found 18 result(s)
The GOES Space Environment Monitor archive is an important component of the National Space Weather Program --a interagency program to provide timely and reliable space environment observations and forecasts. GOES satellites carry onboard a Space Environment Monitor subsystem that measures X-rays, Energetic Particles and Magnetic Field at the Spacecraft.
The Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) is a NASA funded project to support and provide to the astronomical community a variety of astronomical data archives, with the primary focus on scientifically related data sets in the optical, ultraviolet, and near-infrared parts of the spectrum. MAST is located at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI).
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is designed to provide detailed infrared properties of selected Galactic and extragalactic sources. The sensitivity of the telescopic system is about one thousand times superior to that of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), since the ISO telescope enables integration of infrared flux from a source for several hours. Density waves in the interstellar medium, its role in star formation, the giant planets, asteroids, and comets of the solar system are among the objects of investigation. ISO was operated as an observatory with the majority of its observing time being distributed to the general astronomical community. One of the consequences of this is that the data set is not homogeneous, as would be expected from a survey. The observational data underwent sophisticated data processing, including validation and accuracy analysis. In total, the ISO Data Archive contains about 30,000 standard observations, 120,000 parallel, serendipity and calibration observations and 17,000 engineering measurements. In addition to the observational data products, the archive also contains satellite data, documentation, data of historic aspects and externally derived products, for a total of more than 400 GBytes stored on magnetic disks. The ISO Data Archive is constantly being improved both in contents and functionality throughout the Active Archive Phase, ending in December 2006.
The CDAWeb data system enables improved display and coordinated analysis of multi-instrument, multimission data bases of the kind whose analysis is critical to meeting the science objectives of the ISTP program and the InterAgency Consultative Group (IACG) Solar-Terrestrial Science Initiative. The system combines the client-server user interface technology of the World Wide Web with a powerful set of customized IDL routines to leverage the data format standards (CDF) and guidelines for implementation adopted by ISTP and the IACG. The system can be used with any collection of data granules following the extended set of ISTP/IACG standards. CDAWeb is being used both to support coordinated analysis of public and proprietary data and better functional access to specific public data such as the ISTP-precursor CDAW 9 data base that is formatted to the ISTP/IACG standards. Many data sets are available through the Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb) service and the data coverage continues to grow. These are largely, but not exclusively, magnetospheric data and nearby solar wind data of the ISTP era (1992-present) at time resolutions of approximately a minute. The CDAWeb service provides graphical browsing, data subsetting, screen listings, file creations and downloads (ASCII or CDF). Public data from current (1992-present) space physics missions (including Cluster, IMAGE, ISTP, FAST, IMP-8, SAMPEX and others). Public data from missions before 1992 (including IMP-8, ISIS1/2, Alouette2, Hawkeye and others). Public data from all current and past space physics missions. CDAWeb ist part of "Space Physics Data Facility" (https://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100010168).
The Earth Orientation Centre is responsible for monitoring of long-term earth orientation parameters, publications for time dissemination and leap second announcements.
As part of the Copernicus Space Component programme, ESA manages the coordinated access to the data procured from the various Contributing Missions and the Sentinels, in response to the Copernicus users requirements. The Data Access Portfolio documents the data offer and the access rights per user category. The CSCDA portal is the access point to all data, including Sentinel missions, for Copernicus Core Users as defined in the EU Copernicus Programme Regulation (e.g. Copernicus Services).The Copernicus Space Component (CSC) Data Access system is the interface for accessing the Earth Observation products from the Copernicus Space Component. The system overall space capacity relies on several EO missions contributing to Copernicus, and it is continuously evolving, with new missions becoming available along time and others ending and/or being replaced.
The POES satellite system offers the advantage of daily global coverage, by making nearly polar orbits 14 times per day approximately 520 miles above the surface of the Earth. The Earth's rotation allows the satellite to see a different view with each orbit, and each satellite provides two complete views of weather around the world each day. NOAA partners with the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) to constantly operate two polar-orbiting satellites – one POES and one European polar-orbiting satellite called Metop. NOAA's Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) carry a suite of instruments that measure the flux of energetic ions and electrons at the altitude of the satellite. This environment varies as a result of solar and geomagnetic activity. Beginning with the NOAA-15 satellite, an upgraded version of the Space Environment Monitor (SEM-2) has been flown.
WDC for STP, Moscow collects, stores, exchanges with other WDCs, disseminates the publications, sends upon requests data on the following Solar-Terrestrial Physics disciplines: Solar Activity and Interplanetary Medium, Cosmic Rays, Ionospheric Phenomena, Geomagnetic Variations.
The MPC is responsible for the designation of minor bodies in the solar system: minor planets; comets, in conjunction with the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (CBAT); and natural satellites (also in conjunction with CBAT). The MPC is also responsible for the efficient collection, computation, checking and dissemination of astrometric observations and orbits for minor planets and comets
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The database includes world-wide cosmic-ray neutron observations (pressure-corrected 1 hour counts) since 1953. The date are opened in two formats; one is 4096-byte "longformat" data and the other one is 80-byte "cardformat" data. Since the "cardformat" data are prepared only for quick check of data, the "longformat" data, which include information for data usage (constant, factors, etc), should be used for research works. PS files (compressed) of yearly plots are also available.
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
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SMOKA provides public science data obtained at Subaru Telescope, 188cm telescope at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, 105cm Schmidt telescope at Kiso Observatory (University of Tokyo), MITSuME, and KANATA Telescope at Higashi-Hiroshima Observatory. It is intended mainly for astronomical researchers.
The Solar Data Analysis Center serves data from recent and current space-based solar-physics missions, funds and hosts much of the SolarSoft library, and leads the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) effort. SDAC is the active archive, providing network access to data from such missions as SOHO, Yohkoh, and TRACE.
The WDC has a FTP-server to distribute the PCN index derived from the geomagnetic observatory Qaanaaq (THL) and the Kp-index data products derived at the geomagnetic observatory Niemegk (NGK). The WDC is also holding extensive archives of magnetograms and other geomagnetic observatory data products that predate the introduction of digital data recording. The material is in analogue form such as film or microfiche. The Polar Cap index (abbreviation PC index) consists of the Polar Cap North (PCN) and the Polar Cap South (PCS) index, which are derived from magnetic measurements taken at the geomagnetic observatories Qaanaaq (THL, Greenland, +85o magnetic latitude) and Vostok (VOS, Antarctica, -83o magnetic latitude), respectively. The idea behind these indices is to estimate the intensity of anti-sunward plasma convection in the polar caps. This convection is associated with electric Hall currents and consequent magnetic field variations perpendicular to the antisunward plasma flow (and related Hall current) which can be monitored at the Qaanaaq and Vostok magnetic observatories. PC aims at monitoring the energy input from solar wind to the magnetosphere (loading activity). The index is constructed in such a way that it has a linear relationship with the merging Electric Field at the magnetopause; consequently PC is given in units of mV/m as for the electric field. In August 2013, the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) endorsed the PC index. The endorsed PC index is accessible at pcindex.org or through WDC Copenhagen.
The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) measurements are designed to improve understanding of the Earth’s environment and climate. MISR provides radiometrically and geometrically calibrated images in four spectral bands at each of nine widely-spaced angles. Spatial sampling of 275 and 1100 meters is provided on a global basis. All MISR data products are available in HDF-EOS format, and select products are available in netCDF format.
The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) was initially developed to provide a central data bank for NASA's Crustal Dynamics Project (CDP). The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) supports data archiving and distribution activities for the space geodesy and geodynamics community. The main objectives of the system are to store space geodesy and geodynamics related data products in a central data bank, to maintain information about the archival of these data, and to disseminate these data and information in a timely manner to NASA investigators and cooperating institutions.