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Found 135 result(s)
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The Global Proteome Machine (GPM) is a protein identification database. This data repository allows users to post and compare results. GPM's data is provided by contributors like The Informatics Factory, University of Michigan, and Pacific Northwestern National Laboratories. The GPM searchable databases are: GPMDB, pSYT, SNAP, MRM, PEPTIDE and HOT.
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SILVA is a comprehensive, quality-controlled web resource for up-to-date aligned ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences from the Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota domains alongside supplementary online services. In addition to data products, SILVA provides various online tools such as alignment and classification, phylogenetic tree calculation and viewer, probe/primer matching, and an amplicon analysis pipeline. With every full release a curated guide tree is provided that contains the latest taxonomy and nomenclature based on multiple references. SILVA is an ELIXIR Core Data Resource.
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide. The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR) has been established at EMBL-EBI to continue supporting data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, supplemented with new data and new analysis.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
MassIVE is a community resource developed by the NIH-funded Center for Computational Mass Spectrometry to promote the global, free exchange of mass spectrometry data. MassIVE datasets can be assigned ProteomeXchange accessions to satisfy publication requirements.
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FANTOM stands for 'Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome' and is the name of an international research consortium organized by the RIKEN Omics Science Center. The FANTOM5 project aims to build a full understanding of transcriptional regulation in a human system by generating transcriptional regulatory networks that define every human cell type.
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ALEXA is a microarray design platform for 'alternative expression analysis'. This platform facilitates the design of expression arrays for analysis of mRNA isoforms generated from a single locus by the use of alternative transcription initiation, splicing and polyadenylation sites. We use the term 'ALEXA' to describe a collection of novel genomic methods for 'alternative expression' analysis. 'Alternative expression' refers to the identification and quantification of alternative mRNA transcripts produced by alternative transcript initiation, alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation. This website provides supplementary materials, source code and other downloads for recent publications describing our studies of alternative expression (AE). Most recently we have developed a method, 'ALEXA-Seq' and associated resources for alternative expression analysis by massively parallel RNA sequencing.
dbSTS is an NCBI resource that contains sequence data for short genomic landmark sequences or Sequence Tagged Sites. STS sequences are incorporated into the STS Division of GenBank.
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.
ChEMBL is a database of bioactive drug-like small molecules, it contains 2-D structures, calculated properties (e.g. logP, Molecular Weight, Lipinski Parameters, etc.) and abstracted bioactivities (e.g. binding constants, pharmacology and ADMET data). The data is abstracted and curated from the primary scientific literature, and cover a significant fraction of the SAR and discovery of modern drugs We attempt to normalise the bioactivities into a uniform set of end-points and units where possible, and also to tag the links between a molecular target and a published assay with a set of varying confidence levels. Additional data on clinical progress of compounds is being integrated into ChEMBL at the current time.
The miRBase database is a searchable database of published miRNA sequences and annotation. Each entry in the miRBase Sequence database represents a predicted hairpin portion of a miRNA transcript (termed mir in the database), with information on the location and sequence of the mature miRNA sequence (termed miR). Both hairpin and mature sequences are available for searching and browsing, and entries can also be retrieved by name, keyword, references and annotation. All sequence and annotation data are also available for download. The miRBase Registry provides miRNA gene hunters with unique names for novel miRNA genes prior to publication of results.
British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has, for over 60 years, undertaken the majority of Britain's scientific research on and around the Antarctic continent. Atmospheric, biosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and Sun-Earth interactions metadata and data are available. Geographic information and collections are highlighted as well. Information and mapping services include a Discovery Metadata System, Data Access System, the Antarctic Digital Database (ADD), Geophysics Data Portal (BAS-GDP), ICEMAR, a fossil database, and the Antarctic Plant Database.
The NCBI Trace Archive is a permanent repository of DNA sequence chromatograms (traces), base calls, and quality estimates for single-pass reads from various large-scale sequencing projects. The Trace Archive serves as the repository of sequencing data from gel/capillary platforms such as Applied Biosystems ABI 3730®. The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome Analyzer®, Applied Biosystems SOLiD® System, Helicos Heliscope®, and others. The Trace Assembly Archive stores pairwise alignment and multiple alignment of sequencing reads, linking basic trace data with finished genomic sequence.
The Protein database is a collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB. Protein sequences are the fundamental determinants of biological structure and function.
The NCBI Nucleotide database collects sequences from such sources as GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB. Sequences collected relate to genome, gene, and transcript sequence data, and provide a foundation for research related to the biomedical field.
InterPro collects information about protein sequence analysis and classification, providing access to a database of predictive protein signatures used for the classification and automatic annotation of proteins and genomes. Sequences in InterPro are classified at superfamily, family, and subfamily. InterPro predicts the occurrence of functional domains, repeats, and important sites, and adds in-depth annotation such as GO terms to the protein signatures.
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.
A repository for high-quality gene models produced by the manual annotation of vertebrate genomes. The final update of Vega, version 68, was released in February 2017 and is now archived at vega.archive.ensembl.org. We plan to maintain this resource until Feb 2020.