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Found 65 result(s)
Academic Torrents is a distributed data repository. The academic torrents network is built for researchers, by researchers. Its distributed peer-to-peer library system automatically replicates your datasets on many servers, so you don't have to worry about managing your own servers or file availability. Everyone who has data becomes a mirror for those data so the system is fault-tolerant.
US Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Center is a long-term archive and distribution facility for various ground-based, aerial and model data products in support of atmospheric and climate research. ARM facility currently operates over 400 instruments at various observatories (https://www.arm.gov/capabilities/observatories). ARM Data Center (ADC) Archive currently holds over 11,000 data products with a total holding of over 1.5 petabytes of data that dates back to 1993, these include data from instruments, value added products, model outputs, field campaign and PI contributed data. The data center archive also includes data collected by ARM from related program (e.g., external data such as NASA satellite).
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
The goals of the Drosophila Genome Center are to finish the sequence of the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster to high quality and to generate and maintain biological annotations of this sequence. In addition to genomic sequencing, the BDGP is 1) producing gene disruptions using P element-mediated mutagenesis on a scale unprecedented in metazoans; 2) characterizing the sequence and expression of cDNAs; and 3) developing informatics tools that support the experimental process, identify features of DNA sequence, and allow us to present up-to-date information about the annotated sequence to the research community.
British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has, for over 60 years, undertaken the majority of Britain's scientific research on and around the Antarctic continent. Atmospheric, biosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and Sun-Earth interactions metadata and data are available. Geographic information and collections are highlighted as well. Information and mapping services include a Discovery Metadata System, Data Access System, the Antarctic Digital Database (ADD), Geophysics Data Portal (BAS-GDP), ICEMAR, a fossil database, and the Antarctic Plant Database.
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
bugwood.org is the host website of the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health at the University of Georgia (Formerly: Bugwood Network). The Center aims to develop, consolidate and disseminate information and programmes focused on invasive species, forest health, natural resources and agricultural management through technology development, programmes implementation, training, applied research and public awareness at state, regional, national and international levels. The site gives details of its products (Bugwood Image Database; Early Detection and Distribution Mapping and Bugwoodwiki). Details of its projects, services and personnel are provided. Users can also access image databases on Forestry, Insects, IPM, Invasive Species, Forest Pests, weed and Bark Beetle.
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
The CancerData site is an effort of the Medical Informatics and Knowledge Engineering team (MIKE for short) of Maastro Clinic, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Our activities in the field of medical image analysis and data modelling are visible in a number of projects we are running. CancerData is offering several datasets. They are grouped in collections and can be public or private. You can search for public datasets in the NBIA (National Biomedical Imaging Archive) image archives without logging in.
Using a combination of remote sensing data and ground observations as inputs, CHG scientists have developed rainfall and other models that reliably predict crop performance in parts of the world vulnerable to crop failure. Policy makers within governments and at non-governmental organizations rely on CHG decision-support products for making critical resource allocation decisions. The CHG's scientific focus is "geospatial hydroclimatology", with an emphasis on the early detection and forecasting of hydroclimatic hazards related to food security droughts and floods. Basic research seeks an improved understanding of the climatic processes that govern drought and flood hazards in FEWS.NET countries. We develop better techniques, algorithms, and modeling applications to use remote sensing and other geospatial data for hazard early warning.
As part of the Copernicus Space Component programme, ESA manages the coordinated access to the data procured from the various Contributing Missions and the Sentinels, in response to the Copernicus users requirements. The Data Access Portfolio documents the data offer and the access rights per user category. The CSCDA portal is the access point to all data, including Sentinel missions, for Copernicus Core Users as defined in the EU Copernicus Programme Regulation (e.g. Copernicus Services).The Copernicus Space Component (CSC) Data Access system is the interface for accessing the Earth Observation products from the Copernicus Space Component. The system overall space capacity relies on several EO missions contributing to Copernicus, and it is continuously evolving, with new missions becoming available along time and others ending and/or being replaced.
DDBJ; DNA Data Bank of Japan is the sole nucleotide sequence data bank in Asia, which is officially certified to collect nucleotide sequences from researchers and to issue the internationally recognized accession number to data submitters.Since we exchange the collected data with EMBL-Bank/EBI; European Bioinformatics Institute and GenBank/NCBI; National Center for Biotechnology Information on a daily basis, the three data banks share virtually the same data at any given time. The virtually unified database is called "INSD; International Nucleotide Sequence Database DDBJ collects sequence data mainly from Japanese researchers, but of course accepts data and issue the accession number to researchers in any other countries.
The Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is a national user facility with massive-scale DNA sequencing and analysis capabilities dedicated to advancing genomics for bioenergy and environmental applications. Beyond generating tens of trillions of DNA bases annually, the Institute develops and maintains data management systems and specialized analytical capabilities to manage and interpret complex genomic data sets, and to enable an expanding community of users around the world to analyze these data in different contexts over the web. The JGI Genome Portal provides a unified access point to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. A user can find all DOE JGI sequencing projects and their status, search for and download assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes, and interactively explore those genomes and compare them with other sequenced microbes, fungi, plants or metagenomes using specialized systems tailored to each particular class of organisms. Databases: Genome Online Database (GOLD), Integrated Microbial Genomes (IGM), MycoCosm, Phytozome
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) provides data relating to climate change forces and models, ozone depletion and rehabilitation, and baseline air quality. Data are freely available so the public, policy makers, and scientists stay current with long-term atmospheric trends.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
The European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) is a scientifically based and policy driven programme under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) for international co-operation to solve transboundary air pollution problems.
The name Earth Online derives from ESA's Earthnet programme. Earthnet prepares and attracts new ESA Earth Observation missions by setting the international cooperation scheme, preparing the basic infrastructure, building the scientific and application Community and competency in Europe to define and set-up own European Programmes in consultation with member states. Earth Online is the entry point for scientific-technical information on Earth Observation activities by the European Space Agency (ESA). The web portal provides a vast amount of content, grown and collected over more than a decade: Detailed technical information on Earth Observation (EO) missions; Satellites and sensors; EO data products & services; Online resources such as catalogues and library; Applications of satellite data; Access to promotional satellite imagery. After 10 years of operations on distinct sites, the two principal portals of ESA Earth Observation - Earth Online (earth.esa.int) and the Principal Investigator's Portal (eopi.esa.int) have moved to a new platform. ESA's technical and scientific earth observation user communities will from now on be served from a single portal, providing a modern and easy-to-use interface to our services and data.
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) coordinates research and education in bioinformatics throughout Switzerland and provides bioinformatics services to the national and international research community. ExPASy gives access to numerous repositories and databases of SIB. For example: array map, MetaNetX, SWISS-MODEL and World-2DPAGE, and many others see a list here http://www.expasy.org/resources
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
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GSA is a data repository specialized for archiving raw sequence reads. It supports data generated from a variety of sequencing platforms ranging from Sanger sequencing machines to single-cell sequencing machines and provides data storing and sharing services free of charge for worldwide scientific communities. In addition to raw sequencing data, GSA also accommodates secondary analyzed files in acceptable formats (like BAM, VCF). Its user-friendly web interfaces simplify data entry and submitted data are roughly organized as two parts, viz., Metadata and File, where the former can be further assorted into BioProject, BioSample, Experiment and Run, and the latter contains raw sequence reads.
GermOnline 4.0 is a cross-species database gateway focusing on high-throughput expression data relevant for germline development, the meiotic cell cycle and mitosis in healthy versus malignant cells. The portal provides access to the Saccharomyces Genomics Viewer (SGV) which facilitates online interpretation of complex data from experiments with high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays that cover the entire yeast genome.
HITRAN is an acronym for high-resolution transmission molecular absorption database. The HITRAN compilation of the SAO (HIgh resolution TRANmission molecular absorption database) is used for predicting and simulating transmission and emission of light in atmospheres. It is the world-standard database in molecular spectroscopy. The journal article describing it is the most cited reference in the geosciences. There are presently about 5000 HITRAN users world-wide. Its associated database HITEMP (high-temperature spectroscopic absorption parameters) is accessible by the HITRAN website.
HunCLARIN is a strategic research infrastructure of Hungary’s leading knowledge centres involved in R&D in speech- and language processing. It contains linguistic resources and tools that form the basis of research. The infrastructure has obtained an “SKI” qualification (Strategic Research Infrastructure) in 2010, and has been significantly expanded since. Currently comprising 36 members, the infrastructure includes several general- and specific-purpose text corpora, different language processing tools and analysers, linguistic databases as well as ontologies. RIL HAS was a co-founder of the European CLARIN project, which aims at supporting humanities and social sciences research with the help of language technology and by making digital linguistic resources more easily available. In accordance with these goals HunClarin makes the research infrastructures developed by the respective centres directly accessible for researchers through a common network entry point. A general goal of the infrastructure is to realise the interoperability of the collected research infrastructures and to enable comparing the performance of the respective alternatives and to coordinate different foci in R&D. The coordinator and contact person of the infrastructure is Tamás Váradi, RIL HAS.