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Found 328 result(s)
Strong-motion data of engineering and scientific importance from the United States and other seismically active countries are served through the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data(CESMD). The CESMD now automatically posts strong-motion data from an increasing number of seismic stations in California within a few minutes following an earthquake as an InternetQuick Report(IQR). As appropriate,IQRs are updated by more comprehensive Internet Data Reports that include reviewed versions of the data and maps showing, for example, the finite fault rupture along with the distribution of recording stations. Automated processing of strong-motion data will be extended to post the strong-motion records of the regional seismic networks of the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) outside California.
To understand the global surface energy budget is to understand climate. Because it is impractical to cover the earth with monitoring stations, the answer to global coverage lies in reliable satellite-based estimates. Efforts are underway at NASA and universities to develop algorithms to do this, but such projects are in their infancy. In concert with these ambitious efforts, accurate and precise ground-based measurements in differing climatic regions are essential to refine and verify the satellite-based estimates, as well as to support specialized research. To fill this niche, the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) was established in 1993 through the support of NOAA's Office of Global Programs.
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. Building upon the success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the GPM concept centers on the deployment of a “Core” satellite carrying an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites.
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Dog Genome SNP Database (DoGSD) is a data container for the variation information of dog/wolf genomes. It was designed and constructed as an SNPs detector and visualization tool to provide the research community a useful resource for the study of dog's population, evolution, phenotype and life habit.
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SilkDB is a database of the integrated genome resource for the silkworm, Bombyx mori. This database provides access to not only genomic data including functional annotation of genes, gene products and chromosomal mapping, but also extensive biological information such as microarray expression data, ESTs and corresponding references. SilkDB will be useful for the silkworm research community as well as comparative genomics
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information
The Reciprocal Net is a distributed database used by research crystallographers to store information about molecular structures; much of the data is available to the general public. The Reciprocal Net project is still under development. Currently, there are 18 participating crystallography laboratories online. The project is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and part of the National Science Digital Library. The contents of this collection will come principally from structures contributed by participating crystallography laboratories, thus providing a means for teachers, students, and the general public to connect better with current chemistry research. The Reciprocal Net's emphasis is on obtaining structures of general interest and usefulness to those several classes of digital library users.
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
GENCODE is a scientific project in genome research and part of the ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) scale-up project. The GENCODE consortium was initially formed as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE project to identify and map all protein-coding genes within the ENCODE regions (approx. 1% of Human genome). Given the initial success of the project, GENCODE now aims to build an “Encyclopedia of genes and genes variants” by identifying all gene features in the human and mouse genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation, and annotating all evidence-based gene features in the entire human genome at a high accuracy.
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
The UCI Machine Learning Repository is a collection of databases, domain theories, and data generators that are used by the machine learning community for the empirical analysis of machine learning algorithms. It is used by students, educators, and researchers all over the world as a primary source of machine learning data sets. As an indication of the impact of the archive, it has been cited over 1000 times.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. These are the molecules of life that are found in all organisms including bacteria, yeast, plants, flies, other animals, and humans. Understanding the shape of a molecule helps to understand how it works. This knowledge can be used to help deduce a structure's role in human health and disease, and in drug development. The structures in the archive range from tiny proteins and bits of DNA to complex molecular machines like the ribosome.
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At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at https://portal.aodn.org.au/. - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.
U.S. IOOS is a vital tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes environment. A primary focus of U.S. IOOS is integration of, and expedited access to, ocean observation data for improved decision making. The Data Management and Communication (DMAC) subsystem of U.S. IOOS serves as a central mechanism for integrating all existing and projected data sources.
TOXNET (TOXicology Data NETwork) is a group of databases covering chemicals and drugs, diseases and the environment, environmental health, occupational safety and health, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and toxicology. Information in the TOXNET databases covers: Toxicology data: CCRIS (Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System), CPDB (Carcinogenic Potency Database), CTD (Comparative Toxicogenomics Database), GENE-TOX (Genetic Toxicology), HSDB® (Hazardous Substances Data Bank), Haz-Map®, Household Products Database, IRIS (Integrated Risk Information System), ITER (International Toxicity Estimates for Risk), LactMed® (Drugs and Lactation), TRI (Toxics Release Inventory), TOXMAP®, ; Chemical nomenclature: ChemIDplus; Toxicology literature: TOXLINE®, DART® (Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database).
The PeptideAtlas validates expressed proteins to provide eukaryotic genome data. Peptide Atlas provides data to advance biological discoveries in humans. The PeptideAtlas accepts proteomic data from high-throughput processes and encourages data submission.
NCEP delivers national and global weather, water, climate and space weather guidance, forecasts, warnings and analyses to its Partners and External User Communities. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), an arm of the NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), is comprised of nine distinct Centers, and the Office of the Director, which provide a wide variety of national and international weather guidance products to National Weather Service field offices, government agencies, emergency managers, private sector meteorologists, and meteorological organizations and societies throughout the world. NCEP is a critical national resource in national and global weather prediction. NCEP is the starting point for nearly all weather forecasts in the United States. The Centers are: Aviation Weather Center (AWC), Climate Prediction Center (CPC), Environmental Modeling Center (EMC), NCEP Central Operations (NCO), National Hurricane Center (NHC), Ocean Prediction Center (OPC), Storm Prediction Center (SPC), Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), Weather Prediction Center (WPC)
Greengenes is an Earth Sciences website that assists clinical and environmental microbiologists from around the globe in classifying microorganisms from their local environments. A 16S rRNA gene database addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies.
MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (originally known as EOS AM-1) and Aqua (originally known as EOS PM-1) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth is timed so that it passes from north to south across the equator in the morning, while Aqua passes south to north over the equator in the afternoon. Terra MODIS and Aqua MODIS are viewing the entire Earth's surface every 1 to 2 days, acquiring data in 36 spectral bands, or groups of wavelengths (see MODIS Technical Specifications). These data will improve our understanding of global dynamics and processes occurring on the land, in the oceans, and in the lower atmosphere. MODIS is playing a vital role in the development of validated, global, interactive Earth system models able to predict global change accurately enough to assist policy makers in making sound decisions concerning the protection of our environment.
The IERS provides data on Earth orientation, on the International Celestial Reference System/Frame, on the International Terrestrial Reference System/Frame, and on geophysical fluids. It maintains also Conventions containing models, constants and standards.
The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (formerly the National Geophysical Data Center) provide scientific stewardship, products and services for sea floor and lakebed data, including geophysics (gravity, magnetics, seismic reflection, bathymetry, water column sonar), and data derived from sediment and rock samples. NCEI compiles coastal and global digital elevation models, high-resolution models for tsunami inundation studies, provides stewardship for NOS data supporting charts and navigation, and is the US national long-term archive for MGG data