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Found 43 result(s)
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
The dbVar is a database of genomic structural variation containing data from multiple gene studies. Users can browse data containing the number of variant cells from each study, and filter studies by organism, study type, method and genomic variant. Organisms include human, mouse, cattle and several additional animals. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017 ***
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The Global Proteome Machine (GPM) is a protein identification database. This data repository allows users to post and compare results. GPM's data is provided by contributors like The Informatics Factory, University of Michigan, and Pacific Northwestern National Laboratories. The GPM searchable databases are: GPMDB, pSYT, SNAP, MRM, PEPTIDE and HOT.
The Sequence Read Archive stores the raw sequencing data from such sequencing platforms as the Roche 454 GS System, the Illumina Genome Analyzer, the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System, the Helicos Heliscope, and the Complete Genomics. It archives the sequencing data associated with RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Genomic and Transcriptomic assemblies, and 16S ribosomal RNA data.
The BBS is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and Environment Canada's Canadian Wildlife Service to monitor the status and trends of North American bird populations. Following a rigorous protocol, BBS data are collected by thousands of dedicated participants along thousands of randomly established roadside routes throughout the continent. Professional BBS coordinators and data managers work closely with researchers and statisticians to compile and deliver these population data and population trend analyses on more than 400 bird species, for use by conservation managers, scientists, and the general public.
GermOnline 4.0 is a cross-species database gateway focusing on high-throughput expression data relevant for germline development, the meiotic cell cycle and mitosis in healthy versus malignant cells. The portal provides access to the Saccharomyces Genomics Viewer (SGV) which facilitates online interpretation of complex data from experiments with high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays that cover the entire yeast genome.
PDBe is the European resource for the collection, organisation and dissemination of data on biological macromolecular structures. In collaboration with the other worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners - the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) and BioMagResBank (BMRB) in the USA and the Protein Data Bank of Japan (PDBj) - we work to collate, maintain and provide access to the global repository of macromolecular structure data. We develop tools, services and resources to make structure-related data more accessible to the biomedical community.
The miRBase database is a searchable database of published miRNA sequences and annotation. Each entry in the miRBase Sequence database represents a predicted hairpin portion of a miRNA transcript (termed mir in the database), with information on the location and sequence of the mature miRNA sequence (termed miR). Both hairpin and mature sequences are available for searching and browsing, and entries can also be retrieved by name, keyword, references and annotation. All sequence and annotation data are also available for download. The miRBase Registry provides miRNA gene hunters with unique names for novel miRNA genes prior to publication of results.
It is an interactive website offering access to genome sequence data from a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species and major model organisms, integrated with a large collection of aligned annotations. The Browser is a graphical viewer optimized to support fast interactive performance and is an open-source, web-based tool suite built on top of a MySQL database for rapid visualization, examination, and querying of the data at many levels.
The Comparative Mammalian Brain Collection web site provides site visitors with images and information from several of the world's largest collections of well-preserved, sectioned and stained brains of mammals, principally those at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Michigan State University. These collections are currently being consolidated into a central repository at the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. The collections have been a century in the making and represent the efforts of dozens of skilled scientists. Their colocation at a single facility will represent a national and international center for comparative brain study of the actual specimens. The centralized web site offers many kinds of access to the information contained in the specimens, for use by students and researchers worldwide.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.
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KEGG is a database resource for understanding high-level functions and utilities of the biological system, such as the cell, the organism and the ecosystem, from molecular-level information, especially large-scale molecular datasets generated by genome sequencing and other high-throughput experimental technologies
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
The Protein database is a collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB. Protein sequences are the fundamental determinants of biological structure and function.
The NCBI Nucleotide database collects sequences from such sources as GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB. Sequences collected relate to genome, gene, and transcript sequence data, and provide a foundation for research related to the biomedical field.
The Ensembl genome annotation system, developed jointly by the EBI and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has been used for the annotation, analysis and display of vertebrate genomes since 2000. Since 2009, the Ensembl site has been complemented by the creation of five new sites, for bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and invertebrate metazoa, enabling users to use a single collection of (interactive and programatic) interfaces for accessing and comparing genome-scale data from species of scientific interest from across the taxonomy. In each domain, we aim to bring the integrative power of Ensembl tools for comparative analysis, data mining and visualisation across genomes of scientific interest, working in collaboration with scientific communities to improve and deepen genome annotation and interpretation.