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>>>!!!<<< as stated 2017-06-09 MPIDB is no longer available under URL http://www.jcvi.org/mpidb/about.php >>>!!!<<< The microbial protein interaction database (MPIDB) aims to collect and provide all known physical microbial interactions. Currently, 24,295 experimentally determined interactions among proteins of 250 bacterial species/strains can be browsed and downloaded. These microbial interactions have been manually curated from the literature or imported from other databases (IntAct, DIP, BIND, MINT) and are linked to 26,578 experimental evidences (PubMed ID, PSI-MI methods). In contrast to these databases, interactions in MPIDB are further supported by 68,346 additional evidences based on interaction conservation, protein complex membership, and 3D domain contacts (iPfam, 3did). We do not include (spoke/matrix) binary interactions infered from pull-down experiments.
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.