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The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
PDBe is the European resource for the collection, organisation and dissemination of data on biological macromolecular structures. In collaboration with the other worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners - the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) and BioMagResBank (BMRB) in the USA and the Protein Data Bank of Japan (PDBj) - we work to collate, maintain and provide access to the global repository of macromolecular structure data. We develop tools, services and resources to make structure-related data more accessible to the biomedical community.
The Comparative Mammalian Brain Collection web site provides site visitors with images and information from several of the world's largest collections of well-preserved, sectioned and stained brains of mammals, principally those at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Michigan State University. These collections are currently being consolidated into a central repository at the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. The collections have been a century in the making and represent the efforts of dozens of skilled scientists. Their colocation at a single facility will represent a national and international center for comparative brain study of the actual specimens. The centralized web site offers many kinds of access to the information contained in the specimens, for use by students and researchers worldwide.