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Found 92 result(s)
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
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The World Data Centre section provides software and data catalogue information and data produced by IPS Radio and Space Services over the past few past decades. You can download data files, plot graphs from data files, check data availability, retrieve data sets and station information.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
Pubchem contains 3 databases. 1. PubChem BioAssay: The PubChem BioAssay Database contains bioactivity screens of chemical substances described in PubChem Substance. It provides searchable descriptions of each bioassay, including descriptions of the conditions and readouts specific to that screening procedure. 2. PubChem Compound: The PubChem Compound Database contains validated chemical depiction information provided to describe substances in PubChem Substance. Structures stored within PubChem Compounds are pre-clustered and cross-referenced by identity and similarity groups. 3. PubChem Substance. The PubChem Substance Database contains descriptions of samples, from a variety of sources, and links to biological screening results that are available in PubChem BioAssay. If the chemical contents of a sample are known, the description includes links to PubChem Compound.
A collection of data at Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) supporting research that helps people make more informed decisions and improves the quality of health care services. The portal contains U.S.Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) and other sources concerning cost, quality, accesibility and evaluation of healthcare and medical insurance.
bugwood.org is the host website of the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health at the University of Georgia (Formerly: Bugwood Network). The Center aims to develop, consolidate and disseminate information and programmes focused on invasive species, forest health, natural resources and agricultural management through technology development, programmes implementation, training, applied research and public awareness at state, regional, national and international levels. The site gives details of its products (Bugwood Image Database; Early Detection and Distribution Mapping and Bugwoodwiki). Details of its projects, services and personnel are provided. Users can also access image databases on Forestry, Insects, IPM, Invasive Species, Forest Pests, weed and Bark Beetle.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) provides historical and current climate data for the western United States. WRCC is one of six regional climate centers partnering with NOAA research institutes to promote climate research and data stewardship.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network provides data on ozone depletion and the associated effects on terrestrial and marine systems. Data are collected from 7 sites in Antarctica, Argentina, United States, and Greenland. The network is providing data to researchers studying the effects of ozone depletion on terrestrial and marine biological systems. Network data is also used for the validation of satellite observations and for the verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere.
Peptidome was a public repository that archived tandem mass spectrometry peptide and protein identification data generated by the scientific community. This repository is now offline and is in archival mode. All data may be obtained from the Peptidome FTP site. Due to budgetary constraints NCBI has discontinued the Peptidome Repository. All existing data and metadata files will continue to be made available from our ftp server a ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/peptidome/ indefinitely. Those files are named according to their Peptidome accession number, allowing cited data to be identified and downloaded. All of the Peptidome studies have been made publicly available at the PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) database. A map of Peptidome to Pride accessions may be found at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/peptidome/peptidome-pride_map.txt. If you have any specific questions, please feel free to contact us at info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
The Netlib repository contains freely available software, documents, and databases of interest to the numerical, scientific computing, and other communities.
Welcome to INTERMAGNET - the global network of observatories, monitoring the Earth's magnetic field. At this site you can find data and information from geomagnetic observatories around the world. The INTERMAGNET programme exists to establish a global network of cooperating digital magnetic observatories, adopting modern standard specifications for measuring and recording equipment, in order to facilitate data exchanges and the production of geomagnetic products in close to real time.
Nuclear reaction database ENDF contains evaluated (recommended) cross sections, spectra, angular distributions, fission product yields, photo-atomic and thermal scattering law data, with emphasis on neutron induced reactions. The evaluated nuclear reaction databases, ENDF, store nuclear data from the major evaluated libraries: ENDF: Evaluated Nuclear Data File: U.S. and Canada, JEFF: Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion File: Nuclear Energy Agency, JENDL: Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library: Japan, CENDL: China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library: China, BROND: Library of Recommended Evaluated Neutron Data: Russia. as well as various special purpose evaluated libraries.
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Species included in PlantTFDB 4.0 covers the main lineages of green plants. Therefore, PlantTFDB provides genomic TF repertoires across Viridiplantae. To provide comprehensive information for the TF family, a brief introduction and key references are presented for each family. Comprehensive annotations are made for each identified TF, including functional domains, 3D structures, gene ontology (GO), plant ontology (PO), expression information, expert-curated functional description, regulation information, interaction, conserved elements, references, and annotations in various databases such as UniProt, RefSeq, TransFac, STRING, and VISTA. By inferring orthologous groups and constructing phylogenetic trees, evolutionary relationships among identified TFs were inferred. In addition, PlantTFDB has a simple and user-friendly interface to allow users to query based on combined conditions or make sequence similarity search using BLAST.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
NASA’s Precipitation Measurement Missions – TRMM and GPM – provide advanced information on rain and snow characteristics and detailed three-dimensional knowledge of precipitation structure within the atmosphere, which help scientists study and understand Earth's water cycle, weather and climate.
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Thousands of Temperature and salinity profiles obtained by means of Nansen hydrographic casts and available earlier only as station sheets have been digitized at the German Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH). In a cooperative effort between the KlimaCampus of the University of Hamburg and the German Oceanographic Data Centre (DOD, Hamburg) about 7500 hydrographic profiles were checked and identified as missing in the international oceanographic databases. Since most of the profiles were obtained in the decades before the second World War they represent an important extension of the international historical database and a respective contribution to the IOC Global Oceanographic Data Archeology and Rescue Project (GODAR). Since 2009 our efforts resulted in locating about 7500 hydrographic profiles that are not yet available for the oceanographic community.
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Chinese Astronomical Data Center (CAsDC) is the scientific data service and infrastructure of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), which is a key service from the China-VO. We are aiming to meet user requirements for astronomical research and education. The CAsDC is based on World Data Center (WDC) for Astronomy, which is hosted at NAOC and has been providing data services to users since its initiation in 1980s. In 2012, the CAsDC became a regular member of the new created World Data System.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
The Rat Genome Database is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research. Its goal, as stated in RFA: HL-99-013 is the establishment of a Rat Genome Database, to collect, consolidate, and integrate data generated from ongoing rat genetic and genomic research efforts and make these data widely available to the scientific community. A secondary, but critical goal is to provide curation of mapped positions for quantitative trait loci, known mutations and other phenotypic data.