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Found 58 result(s)
The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) is a permanent archive and distribution center primarily for multiple types of digital data relating to earthquakes in central and northern California. The NCEDC is located at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, and has been accessible to users via the Internet since mid-1992. The NCEDC was formed as a joint project of the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at Menlo Park in 1991, and current USGS funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for seismic network operations.
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) are responsible for hosting and providing public access to one of the most significant archives for environmental data on Earth with over 20 petabytes of comprehensive atmospheric, coastal, oceanic, and geophysical data. NCEI headquarters are located in Asheville, North Carolina. Most employees work in the four main locations, but apart from those locations, NCEI has employees strategically located throughout the United States. The main locations are Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–North Carolina (CICS-NC) at Asheville, North Carolina, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at Boulder Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–Maryland (CICS-MD) at Silver Spring Maryland and Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.
! The National Climatic Data Center has merged into the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is responsible for preserving, monitoring, assessing, and providing public access to the Nation's treasure of climate and historical weather data and information.
The National Deep Submergence Facility (NDSF) operates the Human Occupied Vehicle (HOV) Alvin, the Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) Jason 2, and the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Sentry. Data acquired with these platforms is provided both to the science party on each expedition, and to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Data Library.
The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) provides both historical and current Earth science data, information, and products from satellite, airborne, and surface-based instruments. GHRC acquires basic data streams and produces derived products from many instruments spread across a variety of instrument platforms.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
The BGS is a data-rich organisation with over 400 datasets in its care; including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives. Our data is managed by the National Geoscience Data Centre.
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts – which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking – now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses. PAGER uses these earthquake parameters to calculate estimates of ground shaking by using the methodology and software developed for ShakeMaps. ShakeMap sites provide near-real-time maps of ground motion and shaking intensity following significant earthquakes. These maps are used by federal, state, and local organizations, both public and private, for post-earthquake response and recovery, public and scientific information, as well as for preparedness exercises and disaster planning.
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
The MGDS MediaBank contains high quality images, illustrations, animations and video clips that are organized into galleries. Media can be sorted by category, and keyword and map-based search options are provided. Each item in the MediaBank is accompanied by metadata that provides access into our cruise catalog and data repository.
Open Core Data is a data infrastructure focused on making data from scientific continental and ocean drilling projects semantically discoverable, persistent, citable, and approachable to maximize their utility to present and future geoscience researchers.
The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Data Portal, part of the US Antarctic Data Consortium, provides access to geoscience data, primarily marine, from the Antarctic region. The synthesis began in 2003 as the Antarctic Multibeam Bathymetry and Geophysical Data Synthesis (AMBS) with a focus on multibeam bathymetry field data and other geophysical data from the Southern Ocean collected with the R/V N. B. Palmer. In 2005, the effort was expanded to include all routine underway geophysical and oceanographic data collected with both the R/V N. B. Palmer and R/V L. Gould, the two primary research vessels serving the US Antarctic Program.
The R2R Portal is a central shore-side gateway through which underway data from oceanographic expeditions will be routinely cataloged and securely transmitted to the national long-term archives including the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC).
Scripps Institute of Oceanography (SIO) Explorer includes five federated collections: SIO Cruises, SIO Historic Photographs, the Seamounts, Marine Geological Samples, and the Educator’s Collection, all part of the US National Science Digital Library (NSDL). Each collection represents a unique resource of irreplaceable scientific research. The effort is collaboration among researchers at Scripps, computer scientists from the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), and archivists and librarians from the UCSD Libraries. In 2005 SIOExplorer was extended to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with the Multi-Institution Scalable Digital Archiving project, funded through the joint NSF/Library of Congress digital archiving and preservation program, creating a harvesting methodology and a prototype collection of cruises, Alvin submersible dives and Jason ROV lowerings.
CDAAC is responsible for processing the science data received from COSMIC. This data is currently being processed not long after the data is received, i.e. approximately eighty percent of radio occultation profiles are delivered to operational weather centers within 3 hours of observation as well as in a more accurate post-processed mode (within 8 weeks of observation).
As one of the cornerstones of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Geospatial Program, The National Map is a collaborative effort among the USGS and other Federal, State, and local partners to improve and deliver topographic information for the Nation. It has many uses ranging from recreation to scientific analysis to emergency response. The National Map is easily accessible for display on the Web, as products and services, and as downloadable data. The geographic information available from The National Map includes orthoimagery (aerial photographs), elevation, geographic names, hydrography, boundaries, transportation, structures, and land cover. Other types of geographic information can be added within the viewer or brought in with The National Map data into a Geographic Information System to create specific types of maps or map views.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
The Research Data Archive (RDA) at NCAR contains a large and diverse collection of meteorological and oceanographic observations, operational and reanalysis model outputs, and remote sensing datasets to support atmospheric and geosciences research, along with ancillary datasets, such as topography/bathymetry, vegetation, and land use.
LAADS DAAC is the web interface to the Level 1 and Atmosphere Archive and Distribution System (LAADS). The mission of LAADS is to provide quick and easy access to MODIS Level 1, Atmosphere and Land data products, VIIRS Level 1 and Land data products MAS and MERIS data products. MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites.