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BindingDB is a public, web-accessible database of measured binding affinities, focusing chiefly on the interactions of proteins considered to be candidate drug-targets with ligands that are small, drug-like molecules. BindingDB supports medicinal chemistry and drug discovery via literature awareness and development of structure-activity relations (SAR and QSAR); validation of computational chemistry and molecular modeling approaches such as docking, scoring and free energy methods; chemical biology and chemical genomics; and basic studies of the physical chemistry of molecular recognition. BindingDB also includes a small collection of host-guest binding data of interest to chemists studying supramolecular systems. The data collection derives from a variety of measurement techniques, including enzyme inhibition and kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR, and radioligand and competition assays. BindingDB includes data extracted from the literature by the BindingDB project, selected PubChem confirmatory BioAssays, and ChEMBL entries for which a well defined protein target ("TARGET_TYPE='PROTEIN'") is provided. Data extracted by BindingDB typically includes more details regarding experimental conditions, etc
Reactome is a manually curated, peer-reviewed pathway database, annotated by expert biologists and cross-referenced to bioinformatics databases. Its aim is to share information in the visual representations of biological pathways in a computationally accessible format. Pathway annotations are authored by expert biologists, in collaboration with Reactome editorial staff and cross-referenced to many bioinformatics databases. These include NCBI Gene, Ensembl and UniProt databases, the UCSC and HapMap Genome Browsers, the KEGG Compound and ChEBI small molecule databases, PubMed, and Gene Ontology.
GeneWeaver combines cross-species data and gene entity integration, scalable hierarchical analysis of user data with a community-built and curated data archive of gene sets and gene networks, and tools for data driven comparison of user-defined biological, behavioral and disease concepts. Gene Weaver allows users to integrate gene sets across species, tissue and experimental platform. It differs from conventional gene set over-representation analysis tools in that it allows users to evaluate intersections among all combinations of a collection of gene sets, including, but not limited to annotations to controlled vocabularies. There are numerous applications of this approach. Sets can be stored, shared and compared privately, among user defined groups of investigators, and across all users.
DDBJ; DNA Data Bank of Japan is the sole nucleotide sequence data bank in Asia, which is officially certified to collect nucleotide sequences from researchers and to issue the internationally recognized accession number to data submitters.Since we exchange the collected data with EMBL-Bank/EBI; European Bioinformatics Institute and GenBank/NCBI; National Center for Biotechnology Information on a daily basis, the three data banks share virtually the same data at any given time. The virtually unified database is called "INSD; International Nucleotide Sequence Database DDBJ collects sequence data mainly from Japanese researchers, but of course accepts data and issue the accession number to researchers in any other countries.
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Kenya Open Data offers visualizations tools, data downloads, and easy access for software developers. Kenya Open Data provides core government development, demographic, statistical and expenditure data available for researchers, policymakers, developers and the general public. Kenya is the first developing country to have an open government data portal, the first in sub-Saharan Africa and second on the continent after Morocco. The initiative has been widely acclaimed globally as one of the most significant steps Kenya has made to improve governance and implement the new Constitution’s provisions on access to information.
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.