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Found 27 result(s)
The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) provides both historical and current Earth science data, information, and products from satellite, airborne, and surface-based instruments. GHRC acquires basic data streams and produces derived products from many instruments spread across a variety of instrument platforms.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) are responsible for hosting and providing public access to one of the most significant archives for environmental data on Earth with over 20 petabytes of comprehensive atmospheric, coastal, oceanic, and geophysical data. NCEI headquarters are located in Asheville, North Carolina. Most employees work in the four main locations, but apart from those locations, NCEI has employees strategically located throughout the United States. The main locations are Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–North Carolina (CICS-NC) at Asheville, North Carolina, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at Boulder Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–Maryland (CICS-MD) at Silver Spring Maryland and Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.
The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Data Portal, part of the US Antarctic Data Consortium, provides access to geoscience data, primarily marine, from the Antarctic region. The synthesis began in 2003 as the Antarctic Multibeam Bathymetry and Geophysical Data Synthesis (AMBS) with a focus on multibeam bathymetry field data and other geophysical data from the Southern Ocean collected with the R/V N. B. Palmer. In 2005, the effort was expanded to include all routine underway geophysical and oceanographic data collected with both the R/V N. B. Palmer and R/V L. Gould, the two primary research vessels serving the US Antarctic Program.
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
As one of the cornerstones of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Geospatial Program, The National Map is a collaborative effort among the USGS and other Federal, State, and local partners to improve and deliver topographic information for the Nation. It has many uses ranging from recreation to scientific analysis to emergency response. The National Map is easily accessible for display on the Web, as products and services, and as downloadable data. The geographic information available from The National Map includes orthoimagery (aerial photographs), elevation, geographic names, hydrography, boundaries, transportation, structures, and land cover. Other types of geographic information can be added within the viewer or brought in with The National Map data into a Geographic Information System to create specific types of maps or map views.
PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts – which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking – now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses. PAGER uses these earthquake parameters to calculate estimates of ground shaking by using the methodology and software developed for ShakeMaps. ShakeMap sites provide near-real-time maps of ground motion and shaking intensity following significant earthquakes. These maps are used by federal, state, and local organizations, both public and private, for post-earthquake response and recovery, public and scientific information, as well as for preparedness exercises and disaster planning.
The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is an international collaboration with a current focus on serving the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) and supporting climate and environmental science in general. Data is searchable and available for download at the Federated ESGF-CoG Nodes https://esgf.llnl.gov/nodes.html
Central data management of the USGS for water data that provides access to water-resources data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Includes data on water use and quality, groundwater, and surface water.
ERDDAP is a data server that gives you a simple, consistent way to download subsets of gridded and tabular scientific datasets in common file formats and make graphs and maps. This particular ERDDAP installation has oceanographic data (for example, data from satellites and buoys).
DesignSafe-ci.org will provide a comprehensive environment for experimental, theoretical, and computational engineering and science, providing a place not only to steward data from its creation through archive, but also the workspace in which to understand, analyze, collaborate and publish that data. At the heart of the cyberinfrastructure, the Data Depot is the central shared data repository that supports the full research lifecycle, from data creation to analysis to curation and publication. The Data Depot will accept any data the user wishes to supply into a local workspace, even if the data type is unknown or only partial metadata is provided. The Discovery Workspace will be a web-based environment that provides researchers with access to data analysis tools, computational simulation tools, visualization tools, educational tools, and user-contributed tools within the cloud to support research workflows, learning, and discovery. The Reconnaissance Integration Portal will be the main access point to data collected during the reconnaissance of windstorm and earthquake events.
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
Climate Data Online (CDO) provides free access to NCDC's archive of global historical weather and climate data in addition to station history information. These data include quality controlled daily, monthly, seasonal, and yearly measurements of temperature, precipitation, wind, and degree days as well as radar data and 30-year Climate Normals
The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) integrates approximately 100 marine datbases to provide an authoritative and comprehensive list of marine organisms. WoRMS has an editorial system where taxonomic groups are managed by experts responsible for the quality of the information. WorMS register of marine species emerged from the European Register of Marine Species (ERMS) and the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). WoRMS is a contribution to Lifewatch, Catalogue of Life, Encyclopedia of Life, Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Census of Marine Life.
The Space Physics Interactive Data Resource from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center allows solar terrestrial physics customers to intelligently access and manage historical space physics data for integration with environment models and space weather forecasts.
The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center is responsible for processing, archiving, and distribution of NASA Earth science data in the areas of radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry.The ASDC specializes in atmospheric data important to understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities on the climate.
The National Coastal Data Development Center, a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is dedicated to building the long-term coastal data record to support environmental prediction, scientific analysis, and formulation of public policy. >>>!!!<<< For informations about the migration of data from NODC to NCEI see: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/about >>>!!!<<</index.html
USGS data and tools are the digital information in a format suitable for direct input to software that can analyze its meaning in the scientific, engineering, or business context for which the data were collected.
The NSIDC Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) processes, archives, documents, and distributes data from NASA's past and current Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites and field measurement programs. The NSIDC DAAC focuses on the study of the cryosphere. The NSIDC DAAC is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Data Centers.
IRIS offers free and open access to a comprehensive data store of raw geophysical time-series data collected from a large variety of sensors, courtesy of a vast array of US and International scientific networks, including seismometers (permanent and temporary), tilt and strain meters, infrasound, temperature, atmospheric pressure and gravimeters, to support basic research aimed at imaging the Earth's interior.