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Found 30 result(s)
Reactome is a manually curated, peer-reviewed pathway database, annotated by expert biologists and cross-referenced to bioinformatics databases. Its aim is to share information in the visual representations of biological pathways in a computationally accessible format. Pathway annotations are authored by expert biologists, in collaboration with Reactome editorial staff and cross-referenced to many bioinformatics databases. These include NCBI Gene, Ensembl and UniProt databases, the UCSC and HapMap Genome Browsers, the KEGG Compound and ChEBI small molecule databases, PubMed, and Gene Ontology.
The European Union Open Data Portal is the single point of access to a growing range of data from the institutions and other bodies of the European Union (EU). Data are free for you to use and reuse for commercial or non-commercial purposes. By providing easy and free access to data, the portal aims to promote their innovative use and unleash their economic potential. It also aims to help foster the transparency and the accountability of the institutions and other bodies of the EU. The EU Open Data Portal is managed by the Publications Office of the European Union. Implementation of the EU's open data policy is the responsibility of the Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology of the European Commission.
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) assigned unique gene symbols and names to over 35,000 human loci, of which around 19,000 are protein coding. This curated online repository of HGNC-approved gene nomenclature and associated resources includes links to genomic, proteomic and phenotypic information, as well as dedicated gene family pages.
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Research Data Australia is the data discovery service of the Australian National Data Service (ANDS). We do not store the data itself here but provide descriptions of, and links to, the data from our data publishing partners. ANDS is funded by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS).
The Allen Brain Atlas provides a unique online public resource integrating extensive gene expression data, connectivity data and neuroanatomical information with powerful search and viewing tools for the adult and developing brain in mouse, human and non-human primate
Academic Commons provides open, persistent access to the scholarship produced by researchers at Columbia University, Barnard College, Jewish Theological Seminary, Teachers College, and Union Theological Seminary. Academic Commons is a program of the Columbia University Libraries. Academic Commons accepts articles, dissertations, research data, presentations, working papers, videos, and more.
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
mentha archives evidence collected from different sources and presents these data in a complete and comprehensive way. Its data comes from manually curated protein-protein interaction databases that have adhered to the IMEx consortium. The aggregated data forms an interactome which includes many organisms. mentha is a resource that offers a series of tools to analyse selected proteins in the context of a network of interactions. Protein interaction databases archive protein-protein interaction (PPI) information from published articles. However, no database alone has sufficient literature coverage to offer a complete resource to investigate "the interactome". mentha's approach generates every week a consistent interactome (graph). Most importantly, the procedure assigns to each interaction a reliability score that takes into account all the supporting evidence. mentha offers eight interactomes (Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Escherichia coli K12, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) plus a global network that comprises every organism, including those not mentioned. The website and the graphical application are designed to make the data stored in mentha accessible and analysable to all users. Source databases are: MINT, IntAct, DIP, MatrixDB and BioGRID.
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. These are the molecules of life that are found in all organisms including bacteria, yeast, plants, flies, other animals, and humans. Understanding the shape of a molecule helps to understand how it works. This knowledge can be used to help deduce a structure's role in human health and disease, and in drug development. The structures in the archive range from tiny proteins and bits of DNA to complex molecular machines like the ribosome.
TriTrypDB is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for pathogens of the family Trypanosomatidae, including organisms in both Leishmania and Trypanosoma genera. TriTrypDB and its continued development are possible through the collaborative efforts between EuPathDB, GeneDB and colleagues at the Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI).
CaltechDATA is an institutional data repository for Caltech. Caltech library runs the repository to preserve the accomplishments of Caltech researchers and share their results with the world. Caltech-associated researchers can upload data, link data with their publications, and assign a permanent DOI so that others can reference the data set. The repository also preserves software and has automatic Github integration. All files present in the repository are open access or embargoed, and all metadata is always available to the public.
ISRIC - World Soil Information is an independent foundation. As regular member of the ICSU World Data System it is also known as World Data Centre for Soils (WDC-Soils). ISRIC was founded in 1966 through the International Soil Science Society (ISSS) and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). It has a mission to serve the international community with information about the world’s soil resources to help addressing major global issues. ISRIC operates on three priority areas: - soil data and soil mapping - application of soil data in global development issues - training and education
The Rat Genome Database is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research. Its goal, as stated in RFA: HL-99-013 is the establishment of a Rat Genome Database, to collect, consolidate, and integrate data generated from ongoing rat genetic and genomic research efforts and make these data widely available to the scientific community. A secondary, but critical goal is to provide curation of mapped positions for quantitative trait loci, known mutations and other phenotypic data.
A premier source for United States cancer statistics, SEER gathers information related to incidence, prevalence, and survival from specific geographic areas that represent 28 percent of the population, as well as compiles related reports and reports on the national cancer mortality rates. Their aim is to provide information related to cancer statistics and decrease the burden of cancer in the national population. SEER has been collecting data from cancer cases since 1973.
BioVeL is a virtual e-laboratory that supports research on biodiversity issues using large amounts of data from cross-disciplinary sources. BioVeL supports the development and use of workflows to process data. It offers the possibility to either use already made workflows or create own. BioVeL workflows are stored in MyExperiment - Biovel Group http://www.myexperiment.org/groups/643/content. They are underpinned by a range of analytical and data processing functions (generally provided as Web Services or R scripts) to support common biodiversity analysis tasks. You can find the Web Services catalogued in the BiodiversityCatalogue.
Biological collections are replete with taxonomic, geographic, temporal, numerical, and historical information. This information is crucial for understanding and properly managing biodiversity and ecosystems, but is often difficult to access. Canadensys, operated from the Université de Montréal Biodiversity Centre, is a Canada-wide effort to unlock the biodiversity information held in biological collections.
"TaiBIF" stands for Taiwan Biodiversity Information Facility. It is the Taiwan portal of GBIF, and is in charge of integrating Taiwan's biodiversity information, including lists of species and local experts, illustrations of species, introduction of endemic species and invasive species, Taiwan's terrestrial and marine organisms, biodiversity literature, geographical and environmental information, information about relevant institutions, organizations, projects, and observation spots, the Catalog of Life (a list of Taiwanese endemic species), and publications.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
The Government is releasing public data to help people understand how government works and how policies are made. Some of this data is already available, but data.gov.uk brings it together in one searchable website. Making this data easily available means it will be easier for people to make decisions and suggestions about government policies based on detailed information.
ArkDB is a generic, species-independent database built to capture the state of published information on genome mapping in a given species. It stores details of references, markers and loci and genetic linkage and cytogenetic maps which can be drawn using the online map-drawing application. Data from linkage maps held within the ArkDB system can be drawn alongside their corresponding genome sequence maps (extracted from ENSEMBL).
Europeana is the trusted source of cultural heritage brought to you by the Europeana Foundation and a large number of European cultural institutions, projects and partners. It’s a real piece of team work. Ideas and inspiration can be found within the millions of items on Europeana. These objects include: Images - paintings, drawings, maps, photos and pictures of museum objects Texts - books, newspapers, letters, diaries and archival papers Sounds - music and spoken word from cylinders, tapes, discs and radio broadcasts Videos - films, newsreels and TV broadcasts All texts are CC BY-SA, images and media licensed individually.
MetaCyc is a curated database of experimentally elucidated metabolic pathways from all domains of life. MetaCyc contains pathways involved in both primary and secondary metabolism, as well as associated metabolites, reactions, enzymes, and genes. The goal of MetaCyc is to catalog the universe of metabolism by storing a representative sample of each experimentally elucidated pathway. MetaCyc applications include: Online encyclopedia of metabolism, Prediction of metabolic pathways in sequenced genomes, Support metabolic engineering via enzyme database, Metabolite database aids. metabolomics research.