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The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
VectorBase provides data on arthropod vectors of human pathogens. Sequence data, gene expression data, images, population data, and insecticide resistance data for arthropod vectors are available for download. VectorBase also offers genome browser, gene expression and microarray repository, and BLAST searches for all VectorBase genomes. VectorBase Genomes include Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ixodes scapularis, Pediculus humanus, Rhodnius prolixus. VectorBase is one the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRC) projects which is funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAID).
EnsemblPlants is a genome-centric portal for plant species. Ensembl Plants is developed in coordination with other plant genomics and bioinformatics groups via the EBI's role in the transPLANT consortium.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
The objective of the Database of Genomic Variants is to provide a comprehensive summary of structural variation in the human genome. We define structural variation as genomic alterations that involve segments of DNA that are larger than >1kb. Now we also annotate InDels in 100bp-1kb range. The content of the database is only representing structural variation identified in healthy control samples. The Database of Genomic Variants provides a useful catalog of control data for studies aiming to correlate genomic variation with phenotypic data. The database is continuously updated with new data from peer reviewed research studies. We always welcome suggestions and comments regarding the database from the research community.