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Found 34 result(s)
Gramene is a platform for comparative genomic analysis of agriculturally important grasses, including maize, rice, sorghum, wheat and barley. Relationships between cereals are queried and displayed using controlled vocabularies (Gene, Plant, Trait, Environment, and Gramene Taxonomy) and web-based displays, including the Genes and Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) modules.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot is the manually annotated and reviewed section of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB). It is a high quality annotated and non-redundant protein sequence database, which brings together experimental results, computed features and scientific conclusions. Since 2002, it is maintained by the UniProt consortium and is accessible via the UniProt website.
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information
GENCODE is a scientific project in genome research and part of the ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) scale-up project. The GENCODE consortium was initially formed as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE project to identify and map all protein-coding genes within the ENCODE regions (approx. 1% of Human genome). Given the initial success of the project, GENCODE now aims to build an “Encyclopedia of genes and genes variants” by identifying all gene features in the human and mouse genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation, and annotating all evidence-based gene features in the entire human genome at a high accuracy.
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
VectorBase provides data on arthropod vectors of human pathogens. Sequence data, gene expression data, images, population data, and insecticide resistance data for arthropod vectors are available for download. VectorBase also offers genome browser, gene expression and microarray repository, and BLAST searches for all VectorBase genomes. VectorBase Genomes include Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ixodes scapularis, Pediculus humanus, Rhodnius prolixus. VectorBase is one the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRC) projects which is funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAID).
FlyBase is a database of genetic, genomic and functional data for Drosophila species, with a focus on the model organism Drosophila melanogaster.FlyBase contains a complete annotation of the Drosophila melanogaster genome that is updated several times per year.It also includes a searchable bibliography of research on Drosophila genetics in the last century. The site also provides a large database of images illustrating the full genome, and several movies detailing embryogenesis.
EnsemblPlants is a genome-centric portal for plant species. Ensembl Plants is developed in coordination with other plant genomics and bioinformatics groups via the EBI's role in the transPLANT consortium.
>>>!!!<<< as stated 2017-06-09 MPIDB is no longer available under URL http://www.jcvi.org/mpidb/about.php >>>!!!<<< The microbial protein interaction database (MPIDB) aims to collect and provide all known physical microbial interactions. Currently, 24,295 experimentally determined interactions among proteins of 250 bacterial species/strains can be browsed and downloaded. These microbial interactions have been manually curated from the literature or imported from other databases (IntAct, DIP, BIND, MINT) and are linked to 26,578 experimental evidences (PubMed ID, PSI-MI methods). In contrast to these databases, interactions in MPIDB are further supported by 68,346 additional evidences based on interaction conservation, protein complex membership, and 3D domain contacts (iPfam, 3did). We do not include (spoke/matrix) binary interactions infered from pull-down experiments.
The modENCODE Project, Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements, was initiated by the funding of applications received in response to Requests for Applications (RFAs) HG-06-006, entitled Identification of All Functional Elements in Selected Model Organism Genomes and HG-06-007, entitled A Data Coordination Center for the Model Organism ENCODE Project (modENCODE). The modENCODE Project is being run as an open consortium and welcomes any investigator willing to abide by the criteria for participation that have been established for the project. Both computational and experimental approaches are being applied by modENCODE investigators to study the genomes of D. melanogaster and C. elegans. An added benefit of studying functional elements in model organisms is the ability to biologically validate the elements discovered using methods that cannot be applied in humans. The comprehensive dataset that is expected to result from the modENCODE Project will provide important insights into the biology of D. melanogaster and C. elegans as well as other organisms, including humans.
DDBJ; DNA Data Bank of Japan is the sole nucleotide sequence data bank in Asia, which is officially certified to collect nucleotide sequences from researchers and to issue the internationally recognized accession number to data submitters.Since we exchange the collected data with EMBL-Bank/EBI; European Bioinformatics Institute and GenBank/NCBI; National Center for Biotechnology Information on a daily basis, the three data banks share virtually the same data at any given time. The virtually unified database is called "INSD; International Nucleotide Sequence Database DDBJ collects sequence data mainly from Japanese researchers, but of course accepts data and issue the accession number to researchers in any other countries.
The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database provides a specialist database for sequences of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and includes the official sequences named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee For Factors of the HLA System. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database is part of the international ImMunoGeneTics project (IMGT). The database uses the 2010 naming convention for HLA alleles in all tools herein. To aid in the adoption of the new nomenclature, all search tools can be used with both the current and pre-2010 allele designations. The pre-2010 nomenclature designations are only used where older reports or outputs have been made available for download.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) is a public repository for electron microscopy density maps of macromolecular complexes and subcellular structures. It covers a variety of techniques, including single-particle analysis, electron tomography, and electron (2D) crystallography.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
The GeneDB project is a core part of the Sanger Institute's Pathogen Genomics activities. Its primary goals are: to provide reliable access to the latest sequence data and annotation/curation for the whole range of organisms sequenced by the Pathogen group. to develop the website and other tools to aid the community in accessing and obtaining the maximum value from these data.
Established by the HLA Informatics Group of the Anthony Nolan Research Institute, IPD provides a centralized system for studying the immune system's polymorphism in genes. The IPD maintains databases concerning the sequences of human Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), sequences of the major histocompatibility complex in a number of species, human platelet antigens (HPA), and tumor cell lines. Each subject has related, credible news, current research and publications, and a searchable database for highly specific, research grade genetic information.
PDBe is the European resource for the collection, organisation and dissemination of data on biological macromolecular structures. In collaboration with the other worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners - the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) and BioMagResBank (BMRB) in the USA and the Protein Data Bank of Japan (PDBj) - we work to collate, maintain and provide access to the global repository of macromolecular structure data. We develop tools, services and resources to make structure-related data more accessible to the biomedical community.