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Found 46 result(s)
The OpenMadrigal project seeks to develop and support an on-line database for geospace data. The project has been led by MIT Haystack Observatory since 1980, but now has active support from Jicamarca Observatory and other community members. Madrigal is a robust, World Wide Web based system capable of managing and serving archival and real-time data, in a variety of formats, from a wide range of ground-based instruments. Madrigal is installed at a number of sites around the world. Data at each Madrigal site is locally controlled and can be updated at any time, but shared metadata between Madrigal sites allow searching of all Madrigal sites at once from any Madrigal site. Data is local; metadata is shared.
The GOES Space Environment Monitor archive is an important component of the National Space Weather Program --a interagency program to provide timely and reliable space environment observations and forecasts. GOES satellites carry onboard a Space Environment Monitor subsystem that measures X-rays, Energetic Particles and Magnetic Field at the Spacecraft.
Surface air temperature change is a primary measure of global climate change. The GISTEMP project started in the late 1970s to provide an estimate of the changing global surface air temperature which could be compared with the estimates obtained from climate models simulating the effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide, volcanic aerosols, and solar irradiance. The continuing analysis updates global temperature change from the late 1800s to the present.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network provides data on ozone depletion and the associated effects on terrestrial and marine systems. Data are collected from 7 sites in Antarctica, Argentina, United States, and Greenland. The network is providing data to researchers studying the effects of ozone depletion on terrestrial and marine biological systems. Network data is also used for the validation of satellite observations and for the verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere.
GAWSIS is being developed and maintained by the Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology MeteoSwiss in collaboration with the WMO GAW Secretariat, the GAW World Data Centres and other GAW representatives to improve the management of information about the GAW network of ground-based stations. The application is presently hosted by the Swiss Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research Empa. GAWSIS provides the GAW community and other interested people with an up-to-date, searchable data base of site descriptions, measurements programs and data available, contact people, bibliographic references. Linked data collections are hosted at the World Data Centers of the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch.
The EUROLAS Data Center (EDC) is one of the two data centers of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS). It collects, archives and distributes tracking data, predictions and other tracking relevant information from the global SLR network. Additionally EDC holds a mirror of the official Web-Pages of the ILRS at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). And as result of the activities of the Analysis Working Group (AWG) of the ILRS, DGFI has been selected as analysis centers (AC) and as backup combination center (CC). This task includes weekly processing of SLR observations to LAGEOS-1/2 and ETALON-1/2 to compute station coordinates and earth orientation parameters. Additionally the combination of SLR solutions from the various analysis centres to a combinerd ILRS SLR solution.
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
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HALO-DB is the web platform of a data retrieval and long-term archive system. The system was established to hold and to manage a wide range of data based on observations of the HALO research aircraft and data which are related to HALO observations. HALO (High-Altitude and LOng-range aircraft) is the new German research aircraft (German Science Community (DFG)). The aircraft, a Gulfstream GV-550 Business-Jet, is strongly modified for the application as a research platform. HALO offers several advantages for scientific campaigns, such as its high range of more than 10000 km, a high maximum altitude of more than 15 km, as well as a relatively high payload.
The National Science Digital Library provides high quality online educational resources for teaching and learning, with current emphasis on the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines—both formal and informal, institutional and individual, in local, state, national, and international educational settings. The NSDL collection contains structured descriptive information (metadata) about web-based educational resources held on other sites by their providers. These providers have contribute this metadata to NSDL for organized search and open access to educational resources via this website and its services.
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
Climate4impact: a dedicated interface to ESGF for the climate impact community The portal Climate4impact, part of the ENES Data Infrastructure, provides access to data and quick looks of global and regional climate models and downscaled higher resolution climate data. The portal provides data transformation tooling and mapping & plotting capabilities, guidance, documentation, FAQ and examples.
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AVISO stands for "Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data". Here, you will find data, articles, news and tools to help you discover or improve your skills in the altimetry domain through four key themes: ocean, coast, hydrology and ice. Altimetry is a technique for measuring height. Satellite altimetry measures the time taken by a radar pulse to travel from the satellite antenna to the surface and back to the satellite receiver. Combined with precise satellite location data, altimetry measurements yield sea-surface heights.
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The Data Center for Aurora in NIPR is responsible for data archiving and dissemination of all-sky camera observations, visual observations, other optical observations (such as TV and photometric observations), auroral image and particle observations from satellites, geomagnetic observations, and observations of upper atmosphere phenomena associated with aurora such as ULF, VLF and CNA activities. This Data Catalogue summarizes the collection of data sets, data books, related publications and facilities available in the WDC for Aurora as of December 2003. The WDC for Aurora changed its name as "Data Center for Aurora in NIPR" in 2008 due to the disappearance of the WDC panel in ICSU.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) is a publicly accessible earth science data repository created to curate, publicly serve (publish), and archive digital data and information from biological, chemical and biogeochemical research conducted in coastal, marine, great lakes and laboratory environments. The BCO-DMO repository works closely with investigators funded through the NSF OCE Division’s Biological and Chemical Sections and the Division of Polar Programs Antarctic Organisms & Ecosystems. The office provides services that span the full data life cycle, from data management planning support and DOI creation, to archive with appropriate national facilities.
As part of the Copernicus Space Component programme, ESA manages the coordinated access to the data procured from the various Contributing Missions and the Sentinels, in response to the Copernicus users requirements. The Data Access Portfolio documents the data offer and the access rights per user category. The CSCDA portal is the access point to all data, including Sentinel missions, for Copernicus Core Users as defined in the EU Copernicus Programme Regulation (e.g. Copernicus Services).The Copernicus Space Component (CSC) Data Access system is the interface for accessing the Earth Observation products from the Copernicus Space Component. The system overall space capacity relies on several EO missions contributing to Copernicus, and it is continuously evolving, with new missions becoming available along time and others ending and/or being replaced.
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
The POES satellite system offers the advantage of daily global coverage, by making nearly polar orbits 14 times per day approximately 520 miles above the surface of the Earth. The Earth's rotation allows the satellite to see a different view with each orbit, and each satellite provides two complete views of weather around the world each day. NOAA partners with the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) to constantly operate two polar-orbiting satellites – one POES and one European polar-orbiting satellite called Metop. NOAA's Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) carry a suite of instruments that measure the flux of energetic ions and electrons at the altitude of the satellite. This environment varies as a result of solar and geomagnetic activity. Beginning with the NOAA-15 satellite, an upgraded version of the Space Environment Monitor (SEM-2) has been flown.
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Various information, such as xylarium data with wood specimens collected since 1944, atmospheric observation data using the MU radar and other instruments, space-plasma data observed with GEOTAIL satellite, are now combined as Database of Humanosphere and served for public use. Proposals for scientific and technological use are always welcome.
The KNMI Data Centre (KDC) provides access to weather, climate and seismological datasets of KNMI. For each dataset descriptive information is available (metadata), including a point of contact. The KNMI Data Centre (KDC) provides access to KNMI data on weather, climate and seismology. You will find KNMI data on various topics such as: the most recent 10 minutes of observations, historical data, data on meteorological stations, modeling, earthquake data and satellite products.
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CCCma has developed a number of climate models. These are used to study climate change and variability, and to understand the various processes which govern the climate system. They are also used to make quantitative projections of future long-term climate change (given various greenhouse gas and aerosol forcing scenarios), and increasingly to make initialized climate predictions on time scales ranging from seasons to decades. A brief description of these models and their corresponding references can be found: http://ec.gc.ca/ccmac-cccma/default.asp?lang=En&n=4A642EDE-1
The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a key component of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. CERES instruments provide radiometric measurements of the Earth’s atmosphere from three broadband channels. CERES products include both solar-reflected and Earth-emitted radiation from the top of the atmosphere to the Earth's surface.
Additionally to the institutional repository, current St. Edward's faculty have the option of uploading their work directly to their own SEU accounts on stedwards.figshare.com. Projects created on Figshare will automatically be published on this website as well. For more information, please see documentation