Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 161 result(s)
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
Pubchem contains 3 databases. 1. PubChem BioAssay: The PubChem BioAssay Database contains bioactivity screens of chemical substances described in PubChem Substance. It provides searchable descriptions of each bioassay, including descriptions of the conditions and readouts specific to that screening procedure. 2. PubChem Compound: The PubChem Compound Database contains validated chemical depiction information provided to describe substances in PubChem Substance. Structures stored within PubChem Compounds are pre-clustered and cross-referenced by identity and similarity groups. 3. PubChem Substance. The PubChem Substance Database contains descriptions of samples, from a variety of sources, and links to biological screening results that are available in PubChem BioAssay. If the chemical contents of a sample are known, the description includes links to PubChem Compound.
A collection of data at Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) supporting research that helps people make more informed decisions and improves the quality of health care services. The portal contains U.S.Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) and other sources concerning cost, quality, accesibility and evaluation of healthcare and medical insurance.
The Entrez Protein Clusters database contains annotation information, publications, structures and analysis tools for related protein sequences encoded by complete genomes. The data available in the Protein Clusters Database is generated from prokaryotic genomic studies and is intended to assist researchers studying micro-organism evolution as well as other biological sciences. Available genomes include plants and viruses as well as organelles and microbial genomes.
The National Science Digital Library provides high quality online educational resources for teaching and learning, with current emphasis on the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines—both formal and informal, institutional and individual, in local, state, national, and international educational settings. The NSDL collection contains structured descriptive information (metadata) about web-based educational resources held on other sites by their providers. These providers have contribute this metadata to NSDL for organized search and open access to educational resources via this website and its services.
The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) is an information tool to help you locate DOE's collections of data and non-text information and, at the same time, retrieve individual datasets within some of those collections. It includes collection citations prepared by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, as well as citations for individual datasets submitted from DOE Data Centers and other organizations.
The Database of Genomic Variants archive provides curated archiving and distribution of publicly available genomic structural variants. Direct submissions are accepted as well as published data. The DGVa is the primary supplier of data to the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV) (hosted by The Centre for Applied Genomics in Toronto, Canada).
As a department of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) continually surveys and reports on U.S. agriculture. NASS reports include production and supplies of food and fiber, prices paid and received by farmers, farm labor and wages, farm finances, chemical use, and changes in the demographics of U.S. producers. NASS provides objective and unbiased statistics of states and counties, while safeguarding the privacy of farmers and ranchers.
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) assigned unique gene symbols and names to over 35,000 human loci, of which around 19,000 are protein coding. This curated online repository of HGNC-approved gene nomenclature and associated resources includes links to genomic, proteomic and phenotypic information, as well as dedicated gene family pages.
The Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project is a research and development project focusing on global air-sea heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes. The project is committed to produce high-quality, long-term, global ocean surface forcing datasets from the late 1950s to the present to serve the needs of the ocean and climate communities on the characterization, attribution, modeling, and understanding of variability and long-term change in the atmosphere and the oceans. - Links überprüft 14.6.2017 Re
The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the nation's record keeper. Of all documents and materials created in the course of business conducted by the United States Federal government, only 1%-3% are so important for legal or historical reasons that they are kept by us forever. Those valuable records are preserved and are available to you, whether you want to see if they contain clues about your family’s history, need to prove a veteran’s military service, or are researching an historical topic that interests you.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network provides data on ozone depletion and the associated effects on terrestrial and marine systems. Data are collected from 7 sites in Antarctica, Argentina, United States, and Greenland. The network is providing data to researchers studying the effects of ozone depletion on terrestrial and marine biological systems. Network data is also used for the validation of satellite observations and for the verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere.
The USDA Economics, Statistics and Market Information System contains reports and datasets of multiple agencies within the United States Department of Agriculture, including the Agricultural Marketing Service, the Economic Research Service, the Foreign Agricultural Service, the National Agricultural Statistics Service, and the World Agricultural Outlook Board. Historical and current reports and datasets are included.
The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) site offers operational data in near-real time and historic contexts. Focus is on tides and currents but also includes information on harmful algal blooms and weather, etc. Data access is made possible through geopspatial web interfaces as well as OPeNDAP services, etc.
The ACE Science Center (ASC) serves to facilitate collaborative work on data from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft and to ensure that those data are properly archived and publicly available. The collaborators served are not limited to ACE project-funded investigators.
The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples is a tool to help scientists locate and obtain geologic material from sea floor and lakebed cores, grabs, and dredges archived by participating institutions around the world. Data and images related to the samples are prepared and contributed by the institutions for access via the IMLGS and long-term archive at NGDC. Before proposing research on any sample, please contact the curator for sample condition and availability. A consortium of Curators guides the IMLGS, maintained on behalf of the group by NGDC, since 1977.
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
The Abacus Dataverse Network is the research data repository of the British Columbia Research Libraries' Data Services, a collaboration involving the Data Libraries at Simon Fraser University (SFU), the University of British Columbia (UBC), the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) and the University of Victoria (UVic).
Scholars' Bank is the open access repository for the intellectual work of faculty, students and staff at the University of Oregon and partner institution collections.
FungiDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for the kingdom Fungi. FungiDB was first released in early 2011 as a collaborative project between EuPathDB and the group of Jason Stajich (University of California, Riverside). At the end of 2015, FungiDB was integrated into the EuPathDB bioinformatic resource center. FungiDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and also includes experimental and environmental isolate sequence data. The database includes comparative genomics, analysis of gene expression, and supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
SeaBASS, the publicly shared archive of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data maintained by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG). High quality in situ measurements are prerequisite for satellite data product validation, algorithm development, and many climate-related inquiries. As such, the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) maintains a local repository of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data to support their regular scientific analyses. The SeaWiFS Project originally developed this system, SeaBASS, to catalog radiometric and phytoplankton pigment data used their calibration and validation activities. To facilitate the assembly of a global data set, SeaBASS was expanded with oceanographic and atmospheric data collected by participants in the SIMBIOS Program, under NASA Research Announcements NRA-96 and NRA-99, which has aided considerably in minimizing spatial bias and maximizing data acquisition rates. Archived data include measurements of apparent and inherent optical properties, phytoplankton pigment concentrations, and other related oceanographic and atmospheric data, such as water temperature, salinity, stimulated fluorescence, and aerosol optical thickness. Data are collected using a number of different instrument packages, such as profilers, buoys, and hand-held instruments, and manufacturers on a variety of platforms, including ships and moorings.
MTSA is a Metropolitan Travel Survey Archive to store, preserve, and make publicly available, via the internet, travel surveys conducted by metropolitan areas, states and localities. As a result of cooperation from several agencies, we now have been able to post databases along with relevant documentation for many regions in the archive http://www.surveyarchive.org/archive.html . The databases and the documentation can be obtained from this website. In addition to making these databases publicly available, we are also in the process of converting all the databases to a common format to enhance the readability and usability of each survey, so many surveys can be used online, see analyze http://www.surveyarchive.org/analyze.html. The results from the first year of the project, along with issues related to archiving travel survey data are provided in our reports page http://www.surveyarchive.org/reports.html . Papers written by Yacov Zahavi, an instrumental figure in the development of travel surveys, are also provided here.