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Found 8 result(s)
Welcome to INTERMAGNET - the global network of observatories, monitoring the Earth's magnetic field. At this site you can find data and information from geomagnetic observatories around the world. The INTERMAGNET programme exists to establish a global network of cooperating digital magnetic observatories, adopting modern standard specifications for measuring and recording equipment, in order to facilitate data exchanges and the production of geomagnetic products in close to real time.
NetPath is currently one of the largest open-source repository of human signaling pathways that is all set to become a community standard to meet the challenges in functional genomics and systems biology. Signaling networks are the key to deciphering many of the complex networks that govern the machinery inside the cell. Several signaling molecules play an important role in disease processes that are a direct result of their altered functioning and are now recognized as potential therapeutic targets. Understanding how to restore the proper functioning of these pathways that have become deregulated in disease, is needed for accelerating biomedical research. This resource is aimed at demystifying the biological pathways and highlights the key relationships and connections between them. Apart from this, pathways provide a way of reducing the dimensionality of high throughput data, by grouping thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites at functional level into just several hundreds of pathways for an experiment. Identifying the active pathways that differ between two conditions can have more explanatory power than just a simple list of differentially expressed genes and proteins.
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This purpose of this repository is to share Ontario's government data sets online to increase transparency and accountability. We're adding to the hundreds of records we’ve released so far to create an inventory of known government data. Data will either be open, restricted, under review or in the process of being made open, depending on the sensitivity of the information.
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The Pain Genes Database is an interactive web-based data browser of pain-related transgenic knockout studies. It is designed to allow easy access to and analysis of the published pain-related phenotypes of mutant mice (over 200 different mutants at the date of submission). The database features two levels of exploration, one allowing the identification of genes by name, acronym, genomic position or "summary" phenotype, and the other allowing in-depth browsing, paper-by-paper, of specific phenotypes and test parameters. Hosted by the Department of Psychology and Centre for Research on Pain at McGill University.
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Bacteriome.org is a database integrating physical (protein-protein) and functional interactions within the context of an E. coli knowledgebase.
Including data and software from CrystalEye is this a open-access collection of crystal structures of organic, inorganic, metal-organic compounds and minerals, excluding biopolymers. At present, this is the most comprehensive open resource for small molecule structures, freely available to all scientists in Lithuania and worldwide. Including data and software from CrystalEye, developed by Nick Day at the department of Chemistry, the University of Cambridge under supervision of Peter Murray-Rust.